ThinkSpatial: Claudio Fogu

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On Tuesday, March 10 June 9, 2020, The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents

The Fishing Net and the Spider Web—

Making Italians Making Southerners

 

Claudio Fogu

Department of French and Italian
University of California, Santa Barbara

12:00 p.m. Tuesday, March 10 June 9, 2020 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map)

 

Abstract:

This talk will discuss the network-theory approach of Grad Malkin’s study of the Archaic Mediterranean and its extension to the history of the modern Mediterranean. Fogu will focus in particular on the role played by the Italian peninsula, coastal communities, and islands in the oscillation among distributed, centralized, and decentralized patterns of connectivity in the Mediterranean.

Bio:

Claudio Fogu moved to Los Angeles in 1983 to study film at UCLA, and later pursued a Ph.D. in History. He taught at Ohio State University and then at USC. Since moving to UCSB in 2005 he has been an Associate Professor of Italian Studies and teaches courses on Italian cultural history and memory, with an emphasis on film and visual culture. He is author of multiple books and is current President of the California Chapters of the American Association of University Professors (CA-AAUP), President of the UC Santa Barbara Faculty Association (UCSB), and Vice-President for External Affairs of the Consortium of UC Faculty Associations (CUCFA).

 

The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts.

Please contact Werner Kuhn (werner@ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking.

Follow spatial@ucsb on Twitter | Google+ | Google Calendar

[Canceled] Spatial Tech Lunch: Roland Knapp

Canceled due to COVID19 outbreak. Any updates will be posted here.

 

On Wednesday, March 11, from 12:00–1:00 pm please join us for the next Spatial Technology Lunch in the Center for Spatial Studies (Phelps Hall 3512). This semi-regular series, hosted by spatial@ucsb, aims to promote discussion and interaction within the university’s spatial technology community. Please RSVP here by Saturday, March 7. Sandwiches and drinks will be provided.

Spread of a virulent amphibian pathogen across the Sierra Nevada

Dr. Roland Knapp

 

Abstract: The global emergence of the amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium
dendrobatidis: “Bd”) has caused the extinction of at least 90 frog species and the decline of
hundreds more. This impact has been called the most spectacular loss of vertebrate
biodiversity due to disease in recorded history. Bd is believed to have originated in Asia, but is
now distributed worldwide due to global commerce. In California’s Sierra Nevada mountains,
Bd emerged in the 1960s and subsequently spread across the range, causing precipitous
declines of the once-common mountain yellow-legged frog and its eventual listing under the
U.S. Endangered Species Act. Describing this spread, including identifying factors associated
with its arrival in frog populations, would allow better prediction of future spread and aid in the
identification of possible vectors. In this presentation, I will provide details on the patterns of
Bd spread in the Sierra Nevada and solicit input on how these data could best be analyzed.

Bio:
Roland Knapp is a research biologist at the University of California Sierra Nevada
Aquatic Research Laboratory. His research interests include the population and conservation
biology of endangered mountain yellow-legged frogs in California’s Sierra Nevada mountains,
and the community ecology of montane lake ecosystems. The landscape-scale surveys of
aquatic habitats in the southern Sierra Nevada (7,000+ lakes and ponds) that he led form the
basis for ongoing amphibian and lake recovery efforts in Sequoia, Kings Canyon, and
Yosemite National Parks, and beyond. His current research focuses on the recovery of
mountain yellow-legged frogs in the presence of the recently-emerged amphibian chytrid
fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis).

 

Have any questions for Dr. Knapp before or after the discussion? Give him a shout at roland.knapp@ucsb.edu.

ThinkSpatial: Ambuj Singh

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On Tuesday, March 3, 2020, The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents

Inferring Network Structure and Flows using Partial Observations

Ambuj Singh

University of California Santa Barbara

12:00 p.m. Tuesday, January 21, 2020 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map)

Network

Abstract:

Predicting network structure and flows on edges is a precondition to effective planning and disaster response in critical infrastructure networks. I will summarize some ideas inspired by network science, physical modeling, and machine learning to determine this information from incomplete observations. Using both physical domain-specific and data-driven approaches, these algorithms address diverse problems including: the reconstruction of network topology and parameters, the estimation of network flows, the optimal selection and scheduling of multiple types of sensors, and the modeling of interdependencies in multilayer networks. The overall goal is to develop a rigorous theory for solving the inverse problem of edge and flow determination from observations of critical infrastructure networks.

Bio:

Ambuj Singh is a Professor of Computer Science at the University of California, Santa Barbara, with part-time appointments in the Biomolecular Science and Engineering Program and the Technology Management Program. He received a B.Tech. degree from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Texas at Austin. His research interests are broadly in the areas of network science, machine learning, social networks, and bioinformatics. He has published 200 technical papers over his career. He has led a number of multidisciplinary projects including UCSB’s Information Network Academic Research Center funded by the Army, Interdisciplinary Graduate Education Research and Training (IGERT) program on Network Science funded by the NSF, and the Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) on Network Science of Teams (https://muriteams.cs.ucsb.edu/) funded by the U.S. Army. He has graduated approximately 50 Ph.D., M.S., and postdoctoral students over his career, including 26 Ph.D. students.

The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts.

Please contact Werner Kuhn (kuhn@ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking.

Follow spatial@ucsb on Twitter | Google+ | Google Calendar

Save the Date: Spatial Lightning Talks 2020

Save the Date!

The UCSB Center for Spatial Studies presents the 2020 Spatial Lightning Talks on Tuesday, February 11 at 12:00 p.m. This annual series of 3-minute lightning talks brings together speakers from across the UCSB campus as well as the local community to enlighten the crowd on a broad range of spatial topics. This fast-paced, interdisciplinary event is a great opportunity to hear speakers from across campus and in the local community share their work and special interests. Program to be published soon.

When: Tuesday, February 11, 2020 from 12:00 to 1:15 p.m. Lunch will be provided beginning at 11:45 a.m. Where: Interdisciplinary Humanities Center, McCune Conference Room (6020 HSSB).
RSVP HERE. Hope to see you there!

Spatial Lightning Talks 2020

The UCSB Center for Spatial Studies presented the 2020 Spatial Lightning Talks on Tuesday, February 11 at 12:00 p.m. This annual series of 3-minute lightning talks brought together speakers from across the UCSB campus as well as the local community to enlighten the crowd on a broad range of spatial topics. This fast-paced, interdisciplinary event gave the audience a great opportunity to hear about diverse topics as speakers shared their work and special interests. The 2020 talks featured some stars from Geography, English, Statistics, Global Studies, Marine Science, as well as off-campus leaders (General Electric, SB Women in STEM).

LightningTalks2020_Digital

ThinkSpatial: Emmanuel Papadakis

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On Tuesday, January 21, 2020, The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents

Bridging Space and Place in Geographic Information Systems

Emmanuel Papadakis

University of California Santa Barbara

12:00 p.m. Tuesday, January 21, 2020 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map)

Abstract:

People refer, describe and interact with places; geographic information systems (GIS), however, are designed to visualize, process and analyze spaces. Both place and space are used to describe the geographic world, but each provides a different perspective. Place is an informal view framed by symbols, concepts and experience, whereas space is confined to the rigid digital world that adheres to mathematical formulas, data models and processes. Since digital systems have become a vital part of our lives, it is crucial to enable them to visualize, analyze and process the world as humans do. In this presentation, I will tackle a long-lasting question on whether spatial representation standards infused with semantics can create an adequate reflection of the geographical world as it is projected in the human mind. Using the concept of functions, I show how important aspects of place can be formalized and be integrated into GIS. Through examples on place-based search, I depict how a system can combine the processing and visualizing capabilities of machines with the sophisticated concept of place, contributing to the overall idea of a place-based GIS. Finally, I give some insights on further research that aims to incorporate emotions and similar concepts in the aforementioned formalization. Also, I propose the idea of an Algebra of Patterns, which focuses on innovative ways of conducting place synthesis, search, and discovery.

Bio:

Emmanuel Papadakis is a postdoctoral researcher at the Center for Spatial Studies in the Department of Geography at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He received his Ph.D. in Geoinformatics as a member of the Doctoral College GIScience within the Inter-faculty Department of Geoinformatics at the University of Salzburg in October 2019. He holds an M.Sc. and a B.Sc. degree in Computer Science from the University of Crete, Greece. His research focuses on modeling, knowledge representation and reasoning of vague concepts such as fuzzy spatiotemporal entities, spatial functions, places, environmental stress and others aiming to introduce formalizations that enable their digitization and effective integration in digital systems.

The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts.

Please contact Werner Kuhn (kuhn@ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking.

Follow spatial@ucsb on Twitter | Google+ | Google Calendar

ThinkSpatial: Somayeh Dodge

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On Tuesday, January 14, 2020, The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents

Multi-Scale Modeling and Analysis of Movement

Somayeh Dodge

University of California Santa Barbara

12:00 p.m. Tuesday, January 14, 2020 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map)

Abstract:

Movement is a complex multidimensional process that operates in a space-time-context continuum across multiple scales. Regardless of the context or entity type, movement happens through a series of embedded patterns at different granularities. Hence, the study of movement requires careful consideration and integration of all three forms of granularity (as in Kuhn (2012)): spatial (micro-steps to macro flows), temporal (high-frequency short-term events to low-frequency long-term processes), and thematic (individual movement to collective dynamics). This presentation reviews my ongoing work on synthesizing a multiscale model of movement through mining and integration of movement patterns at different granularities. Using movement ecology as an application, I show how multiscale analysis of trajectories are applied to identify patterns of movement at different frequencies and how these patterns can be combined in a multiscale model of movement to reconstruct trajectories.

Bio:

Somayeh Dodge serves as Assistant Professor of Spatial Data Science and leads the Move Laboratory in the Department of Geography at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She received her PhD in Geography with a specialization in Geographic Information Science (GIScience) from the University of Zurich, Switzerland in October 2011. She holds a MS degree in GIS Engineering and a BS degree in Geomatics Engineering from the KNT University of Technology, Iran. Dodge’s research focuses on developing data analytics, knowledge discovery, modeling, and visualization techniques to study movement in human and ecological systems. She has published in a number of high-ranked international journals such as Methods in Ecology and EvolutionInternational Journal of Geographic Information SciencePhilosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, Journal of Spatial Information Science (JOSIS)Movement EcologyComputers, Environment and Urban Systems (CEUS)Geographical Analysis, and Information Visualization. Dodge has recently been appointed as the Co-Editor in Chief of the Journal of Spatial Information Science. She currently serves on the editorial board of multiple journals including Geographical AnalysisCEUSJournal of Location Based Services, and The Professional Geographer.

The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts.

Please contact Werner Kuhn (kuhn@ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking.

Follow spatial@ucsb on Twitter | Google+ | Google Calendar

Spatial Data Science Hangout Series: November 2019

T next seminar in the Center for Spatial Studies’ Spatial Data Hangouts series will be on Tuesday, 11/19 from 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m. at 3512 Phelps Hall. All grad students are invited to attend.

Continuing the theme of finding academic employment, where we discuss why and how to apply for a professorship, we will continue last month’s discussion of the academic hiring process and talk about interviews on-site and per teleconference. We will also do at least one test run to give you a chance to practice. Hence, if you would like to volunteer and be interviewed in front of the other students, please let Jano or Karen know.

We will be providing a light lunch after the discussion. Please contact Karen Doehner if you plan to attend.

 

New Spatial Visitor: Ekaterina Egorova

The Center for Spatial Studies is happy to announce the arrival of a visitor to the center, Ekaterina Egorova (September, 2019-March, 2020)

 

Swiss National Science Foundation, Switzerland

 

Ekaterina Egorova 

holds a PhD in Geographic Information Science from the University of Zurich, Switzerland. Her

research has concentrated on studying the conceptualization of  remote natural environments

through the prism of textual Volunteered Geographic Information. Her current project, financed

through a grant from the Swiss National Science Foundation, examines the spatial and temporal

aspects of human-environment interaction in the context of nature-based recreation activities, focussing on the Southern Alps, New Zealand.

Ekaterina’s research lies at the intersection of GIScience, spatial cognition and cognitive linguistics, and combines methods from NLP, Geographic Information Retrieval, computational discourse analysis, and spatial analysis. Her interests include the production and processing of geographic information across a variety of contexts, spatial semantics, and methods for the automated extraction of spatial concepts from multimodal geographic information sources.

 

Her work can be explored at:
Google scholar: https://scholar.google.ch/citations?user=wnWxRQ4AAAAJ&hl=en&oi=sra
Twitter: @textandspace

Please join us in welcoming Ekaterina to campus! She will be working at 3512 Phelps Hall during her stay–please feel free to contact her — ekaterina.egorova@geo.uzh.ch — if your research interests intersect with hers.