Spatial Pathways provides information and guidance about possible course selections to complement different career orientations and discipline specializations. For students and their major advisors, Spatial Pathways may help answer the question “How can a minor in spatial studies enhance my degree in ______ / my career interest in ______?” In time, this resource will also provide substantive vignettes based on the actual experiences of students who complete the minor.

There are options!

With many courses to choose from in the minor, consider how your selection might complement your major, add credentials for meeting your career aspirations, or prepare you for advanced studies at the graduate level.

If you have an idea of what you want to achieve, design your own plan (your spatial pathway) and discuss it with your major advisor and with advisors for the Minor in Spatial Studies. Here are some examples of what other students are doing:

  • A major in Communication wants to understand how innovations spread globally and regionally, with the intent of pursuing research on related topics in graduate school. The minor includes courses related to the mapping of information, providing research and visualization tools for illustrating global patterns of innovation, and for analyzing information transfers geographically.
  • An Art student is keen on public art but wants to complement this with an understanding of the actual locations of art as situated in relation to the flow of pedestrians and vehicles. Courses in geographic information systems (GIS) and cartography provide concepts and analytic capabilities to meet her objectives.
  • Philosophy student is oriented toward law school but has a significant interest in spatial representation in mathematics. The flexibility of the spatial studies minor allows for such exploratory intellectual development.
  • Geography student is interested in the possible transfer of spatial concepts and technologies from other disciplines to his own interest in geographical landscape transformation. As part of the minor, he is taking a course in Materials Science, a discipline that studies the structure and processes of phenomena at a micro scale. Will he discover insights applicable to the analysis of earth-scale processes? We don’t know, but such curiosity-driven studies can sometimes break new ground in science.
  • An Environmental Studies major is looking at the spatial thinking focus in the minor to better grasp how human perception and cognition relate to debates over solutions to environmental problems.

The following table lists courses approved for the Minor in Spatial Studies that relate to possible career orientations and areas of academic interest. These are not programs but rather examples of how courses within the minor can be combined around specific themes.

Geographies of Place
Human Communities
Operations Research
Planning and Design
Spatially Integrated Social Science
 
Global Patterns
Human Systems
Physical Systems
Spatial Information Technologies

 

Academic Themes made possible through Spatial Studies

Combine courses to create your own Pathway and discuss it with academic advisors

Why is Spatial Perspective Important?

Suggested Courses for a

Minor in Spatial Studies

Students must meet pre-requisites; no more than one upper-division course can overlap those credited to a major or other minor; no more than three courses from a single department or program

Geographies of Place

Human activities and values are shaped by the places in which they occur. The arts and humanities offer insight into the dynamics of human interactions that build identity with place. Regional geography provides one basis for linking place into a broader environmental and locational context.

 

ARTHI 136J—Landscape of Colonialism
ARTHI 136M—Revival Styles in Southern California Architecture
ARTHI 136V—Modern Indian Visual Culture
ARTHI 136Y—Modern Architecture in Southern California, C. 1890s to the Present
ARTST 111—Digital Imaging and Public Space Arts
CLASS 160—Greek Cities and Sanctuaries
EACS 175—Sacred Geography in China and Japan
ENV S 183 or FLMST 183—Films of the Natural and Human Environment
GEOG 148—California
GEOG 150—Geography of the United States
GEOG 155—Geography of Latin America
GEOG 159—Geography of Europe
HIST 155E—Portugal Overseas
HIST 176 A/B—The American West
RG ST 128C—The Sacred Geography of the Ancient Mediterranean

Global Patterns

The understanding of pattern interrelatedness at the global scale is aided by historical context, theoretical perspectives from different disciplines, a focus on systems concepts, and the use of mapping and remote sensing technologies.

 

ARTHI 136J—Landscape of Colonialism
C LIT 107—Voyages to the Unknown
EEMB 142B—Environmental Processes in Oceans and Lakes
ENV S 130C—Global Food Systems and Human Food Security
ENV S 149—World Agriculture, Food, and Population
ENV S 167—Biogeography: The Study of Plant and Animal Distributions
GEOG 115A—The Earth from Above
GEOG 126—Maps in Science and Society
GEOG 134—Earth System Science
GEOG 140—Environmental Impacts in Human History
GEOG 182—Global Cities in the Information Age
HIST 155E—Portugal Overseas
LING 181—Languages of the World

Human Communities

Human communities include tribal settlements, refugee settlements, squatter settlements, rural communities, cities, and urban systems. Their origins, functions, and physical forms tangibly reflect technological changes, historical transitions, and expressions of human values and cultures.

 

ANTH 184—Settlement Pattern Analysis in Archaeology ARTHI 136a—Nineteenth-Century Architecture
ARTHI 136b—Twentieth-Century Architecture
ARTHI 136I—The City in History
CLASS 160—Greek Cities and Sanctuaries
ECON 120—Urban and Regional Economics
GEOG 108—Urban Geography
GEOG 109—Economic Geography
GEOG 182—Global Cities in the Information Age
SOC 126—Urban Society

Human Systems

Human systems may be explored at biological and societal levels in terms of neurological processes, individual behaviors, and human interactions. Spatial representations and analyses of these systems provide insights into human thought processes, creativity, and methodologies for solving problems.

 

ANTH 148—Ecological Anthropology
ANTH 160—Cultural Ecology
ANTH 184—Settlement Pattern Analysis in Archaeology
C LIT 191—Fantasy and the Fantastic
CMPSC 180—Computer Graphics
CMPSC 181B or ECE 181B—Introduction to Computer Vision
GEOG 111A—Transportation Planning and Modeling
GEOG 111B—Transportation Modeling and Simulation
GEOG 191/191L—Introduction to Optimization Methods for Geographic Problems
MCDB 151—Neurobiology I: Cellular Organization and Biophysics of the Nervous System
MCDB 152—Neurobiology II: Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology
MUS 160F—Sound Color: Timbre and Music Notation
MUS 169—Notation and Transcription in Ethnomusicology
PSTAT 140—Statistical Process Control
PSTAT 160A-B—Applied Stochastic Processes
PSTAT 174—Time Series
PSY 107—Introduction to Perception
PSY 108—Introduction to Cognitive Psychology
PSY 110A—Perception: Vision
PSY 128—Human Thinking and Problem Solving
SOC 148MA—Social Network Analysis

Operations Research

Integrated applications of mathematics, statistics, computers, and visualization technologies provide a basis for optimizing the spatio-temporal allocation of resources and designing solutions to complex problems.

 

CMPSC 180—Computer Graphics
CMPSC 181B or ECE 181B—Introduction to Computer Vision
GEOG 111A—Transportation Modeling and Simulation
GEOG 128—Analytical and Computer Cartography
GEOG 153D—Spatial Decisions in Retailing
GEOG 172—Intermediate Geographical Data Analysis
GEOG 190—Location Theory and Modeling
GEOG 191/191L—Introduction to Optimization Methods for Geographic Problems
MATH 102A-B—Modern Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometry
MATH 113—Non-Euclidean Geometry
MATH 137A-B—Graph and Network Theory
MATH 145—Introduction to Topology
MATH 147A-B—Introductory Differential Geometry
PSTAT 123—Sampling Techniques
PSTAT 126—Regression Analysis
PSTAT 131—Data Mining
PSTAT 140—Statistical Process Control
PSTAT 160A–-B—Applied Stochastic Processes
PSTAT 174—Time Series
SOC 148MA—Social Network Analysis

Physical Systems

Physical reality ranges from nano to galactic. Yet, regardless of scale, the physical sciences and related branches of engineering depend on tools that enhance the measurement and representation of space-time processes, capturing evidence to support inferences about the structures and evolutionary development of systems.

 

CMPSC 180—Computer Graphics
CMPSC 181B or ECE 181B—Introduction to Computer Vision
EARTH 104A—Field Studies in Geological Methods
EEMB 142A/EEMB 142AL—Aquatic Communities
EEMB 142B—Environmental Processes in Oceans and Lakes
ENV S 114A—Soil Science
ENV S 152—Applied Marine Ecology
ENV S 167—Biogeography: The Study of Plant and Animal Distributions
GEOG 134—Earth System Science
MATRL 100A—Structure and Properties I
MATRL 101—Introduction to the Structure and Properties of Materials
PHIL 124C—Philosophy of Space and Time
PHYS 106—Nonlinear Phenomena
PHYS 131—Gravitation and Relativity
PHYS 133—Galaxies and Cosmology
PHYS 141—Optics

Planning and Design

The built environment for human occupance is a product of planning and design. Regardless of scale (household, local landscape, urban region, or global environment), changes in the structures and activities of spatial units entail the representation of ideas and information, forecasts and evaluations of the effectiveness and aesthetics of potential outcomes, and making decisions about resource allocations.

 

ARTHI 136O—Sustainable Architecture: History and Aesthetics

ARTHI 140E—Landscape Design History
ARTST 102—Digital Media Tool Box: Concepts and Skills
ARTST 111—Digital Imaging and Public Space Arts
ARTST 177—Art and Science of Aerospace Culture
CLASS 160—Greek Cities and Sanctuaries
CMPSC 180—Computer Graphics
ECON 120—Urban and Regional Economics
EEMB 128—Foundations of Ecosystem Restoration
ENV S134—Coastal Processes and Management
ENV S135A—Principles of Environmental Planning
ENV S135B—Advanced Environmental Planning
ENV S165A—Environmental Impact Analysis
ENV S165B—Advanced Environmental Impact Analysis
GEOG 101—Transportation Futures
GEOG 111A—Transportation Modeling and Simulation
GEOG 128—Analytical and Computer Cartography
GEOG 153D—Spatial Decisions in Retailing
GEOG 182—Global Cities in the Information Age
GEOG 183—Cartographic Design and Geovisualization
GEOG 185A—Geography Planning and Policy Making
GEOG 185B—Environmental Issues and Location Decision Making

GEOG 190—Location Theory and Modeling
GEOG 191/191L—Introduction to Optimization Methods for Geographic Problems

Spatial Information Technologies

Spatial technologies are critical to understanding, representing, and managing the flows of information that guide our interpretation of a rapidly changing world.

 

ARTST 102—Digital Media Tool Box: Concepts and Skills
ARTST 105—Intermediate Spatial Practices
ARTST 106—Advanced Spatial Practices
ARTST 122—Advanced Topics in Digital Media
ARTST 130—Visual Arts as Culture
CMPSC 180—Computer Graphics
CMPSC 181B or ECE 181B—Introduction to Computer Vision
EARTH 176—Geological Applications of GIS
ENV S183 or FLMST 183—Films of the Natural and Human Environment
GEOG 115A—The Earth from Above
GEOG 115B—Introduction to Remote Sensing
GEOG 128—Analytical and Computer Cartography
GEOG 176A—Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
GEOG 183—Cartographic Design and Geovisualization
MUS 169—Notation and Transcription in Ethnomusicology
SOC 148MA—Social Network Analysis

Spatially Integrated Social Science

Spatially integrated social science recognizes the key role that spatial concepts such as distance, location, proximity, neighborhood, and region play in human society. GIS, cartographic visualization, pattern recognition, and spatially sensitive statistical analysis are important tools for integrating knowledge across disciplines.

 

ANTH 184—Settlement Pattern Analysis in Archaeology
ECON 120—Urban and Regional Economics
GEOG 126—Maps in Science and Society
GEOG 128—Analytical and Computer Cartography
GEOG 172—Intermediate Geographical Data Analysis
GEOG 176A—Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
PSTAT 123—Sampling Techniques
PSTAT 126—Regression Analysis
SOC 148MA—Social Network Analysis

 

 

 

 


Last modified: June 27, 2014