FlowMapper

  Tobler’s Flow Mapper Background Geographical movement is of crucial importance. This is because much change in the world is due to movement; the movement of people, ideas, money, or material. One way of depicting and analyzing geographical movement is by way of geographical maps. A convenient and rapid method of displaying movement data on such maps is therefore very useful. A flow mapping program is one approach to this objective. For in depth information see: Flow Mapper Tutorial, Tobler 2004 4.7MB Updated! (7-19-05) Movement Mapping, Tobler 2003 2.5 MB Experiments in Migration Mapping by Computer, Tobler 2003 500 kb About Flow Mapper In 2003 CSISS supported an effort to produce an interactive flow mapping program. The result is an updated Windows-based version of a program originally designed and programmed by Waldo Tobler in 1987. Tobler’s original application was updated by David Jones using Microsoft Visual Basic .Net and SVG (Scaleable Vector Graphics) for map rendering. It requires as input locational coordinates and a table of interaction between places. Additional input may include place names for the location coordinates and a file of boundary coordinates (the background map). The user has several menu options for producing a map. The program allows for the production of a total movement map shown by volume-scaled bands, net movement given by scaled arrows, or simultaneous two-way moves. Flow Mapper Functionality in ArcGIS Flow Data Model Tools consist of several ArcGIS 9.x VBA macros. The prototype software integrates the functionality of Flow Mapper into ArcGIS, and allows ArcGIS interaction with the Flow Data Model. Source code and further information. Flow Mapper Requirements Microsoft Windows 98SE, ME, 2000 or XP Microsoft Dot.Net Framework Installed Microsoft Internet Explorer (Required to display maps properly) Scalable Vector Graphics Support for Internet Explorer: Adobe SVG Plugin 3.x or higher C:temp folder Installng Flow Mapper Remove any existing version of Flow Mapper (Start > Control Panel > Add/Remove Programs). Verify that your operating system meets the requirements above. Install the .Net Framework if necessary. Many newer Windows machines already come pre-installed with it. Go to Start > Control Panel, the .Net Framework Management Icon will be visible if it is installed (you may need to look in Administrative Tools.) If not visible you will need to Download and install the .Net Framework (21MB) If you you have not done so previously, install Adobe SVG Plugin. If you are unsure, install it again. Download and install Adobe SVG Viewer (2.4MB) Make sure C:Temp (c:temp) exists, the application uses this directory to write temporary files. Download and install Flow Mapper (22MB), unzip the files on temporary directory and run setup.exe. Flow mapper will be installed and a shortcut will be placed in...

R programming language

R can be found at http://cran.r-project.org/ and the http://www.r-project.org/. The R Journal can be found at http://journal.r-project.org/. Specific materials vis-à-vis the Analysis of Spatial Data (written by Roger Bivand) can be found at: http://cran.r-project.org/web/views/Spatial.html http://r-spatial.sourceforge.net/ R at spatialanalys is online: http://www.spatialanalysisonline.com/output/html/R-Projectspatialstatisticssoftwarepackages.html R Spatial Projects at the GeoDA Center (Arizona State University): http://geodacenter.asu.edu/r-spatial-projects/ R at Spatial Analyst dot Net: http://spatial-analyst.net/wiki/index.php?title=Training_in_R Quick-R (a starting point with links to books and tutorials): http://www.statmethods.net/index.html Books Bivand, R.S.,  E.J. Pebesma, and V. Gómez-Rubio. 2008. Applied Spatial Data in R Springer: New York, NY. http://www.springerlink.com/content/m5171462720p. Homepage for the ASDAR book: http://www.asdar-book.org. Useful Articles Bivand, R.S. 2006. Implementing Spatial Data Analysis Software Tool in R. Geographical Analysis 38: 23–40. Bivand, R.S. (2003) Approaches to Classes for Spatial Data in R. Proceedings of the 3rd International Workshop on Distributed Statistical Computing, Vienna. http://www.ci.tuwien.ac.at/Conferences/DSC-2003/Proceedings/Bivand.pdf Gómez-Rubio, V. 2003. RArcInfo: Using GIS data with R. Proceedings of the 3rd International Workshop on Distributed Statistical Computing, Vienna. http://www.ci.tuwien.ac.at/Conferences/DSC-2003/Proceedings/GomezRubio.pdf Bivand, R.S. 2002. Spatial econometrics functions in R: Classes and methods. Journal of Geographical Systems 4: 405–421. http://spatial.nhh.no/papers/bivand-jgs03-rev.pdf or http://www.nceas.ucsb.edu/scicomp/Dloads/RProgramming/BivandSpatialEconometricsR.pdf Bivand, R.S. and A. Gebhardt. 2000. Implementing functions for spatial statistical analysis using the R language. Journal of Geographical Systems 2(3): 307–317. On-line Courses and Tutorials in R R at Spatial Analyst dot Net http://spatial-analyst.net/wiki/index.php?title=Training_in_R 2007: Short Course in Analyzing Spatial Data in R offered at Imperial College London by Prof. Roger Bivand, (Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration) and Dr. Virgilio Gómez-Rubio (Imperial College London). This website includes links to presentations and other materials....

Spatial Thinking

What is spatial thinking? For one thing, it is the ability to apply concepts like height, depth, and distance to comprehend the natural and social universe. The concept of spatial thinking isn’t new, though the identification of the need to promote spatial literacy is. Introduced early in a student’s education, the development of spatial literacy can open new doors to learning and help unveil the complexity and dynamics of real-world problems. At the university level, spatial technologies such as geographic information systems (GIS) can be applied to a huge range of problems to reveal previously unseen patterns and trends. Insights from seemingly unrelated disciplines-black studies and computer science, for example – can be applied to emerging questions. spatial@ucsb is already making a difference. The creation of spatial@ucsb is helping to catalyze global interest in integrating spatial thinking into a host of disciplines for teaching and research. It is helping educators to identify what curricula and resources are needed to better teach spatial thinking. It is stimulating research on tools for and applications of spatial thinking. It is encouraging disciplines at UC Santa Barbara and beyond to consider how the application of spatial thinking will enhance their teaching and research. And it is bringing together the world’s leaders in spatial thinking through research seminars, workshops, and other...

GIS Help Desk

Consultations by appointment: help-desk@spatial.ucsb.edu Do you need help with GIS? As part of the Center’s effort to promote spatial thinking, techniques, and tools across campus, spatial@ucsb offers “GIS help desk” research consultations. The free service is staffed by a Center graduate student and is open to the entire campus community. The primary focus is on research design and implementation for faculty, staff, and student projects. Also, the help desk serves as a point of departure to connect to the spatial resources available across campus, such as expert personnel, instructional materials, and software. Since the consultation program began in 2008, support requests have ranged from simple cartographic design advice to complex, multistep spatial information modeling. Sample projects that have received technical support include: inferring geographic location from documentary screenshots (Film & Media Studies) estimating a parking capacity surface by integrating polygon- and polyline-based data (Department of Geography) areas of endemism for insects (NCEAS) assessing crime patterns near various categories of media distribution sites (Department of Communication) routing police patrols to disrupt gang activity (Department of Economics) identifying dangerous bridges with respect to pedestrian traffic (Department of Political Science) assessing cartographic arrangement against spatial cognition (Department of Psychology) prescribing maintenance schedules for campus roads, parking lots and paths by quantitatively modeling condition (Design and Construction Services) Students and interested researchers are encouraged to contact help-desk@spatial.ucsb.edu for a consultation appointment. For support with Esri software licenses and ArcGIS Online, and additional support finding and using appropriate spatial data, please contact the Map and Imagery Laboratory...

Visitor Presentations

Date Speaker Title Abstract 11/29/2012 Paul Wilson, General Electric Digital Energy Mission-Critical Mobile Mapping 05/30/2012 Pinde Fu, ESRI WebGIS: Principles and Applications 02/23/2012 Markus Knauff, University of Giessen Space to Reason 02/09/2012 Simon Scheider, University of Münster Grounding Geographic Information in Perceptual Operations 02/03/2012 Werner Kuhn, University of Münster spatial@world—what concepts of spatial information are essential for science and society? 10/06/2011 Ashton Shortridge, Michigan State University Spatial Data Uncertainty For the Masses 02/05/2009 Jennifer Light, Northwestern University Taking Games Seriously 05/29/2008 Shashi Shekkar, ESRI Evacuation Route Planning: Novel Spatio-Temporal Network Models and Algorithms 05/29/2008 Jack Dangermond, President of ESRI Shoreh Elhami, Co-founder and Chair, GISCorps University to Inaugurate spatial@ucsb—Connecting our Region through GIS and Geospatial Technologies 05/12/2008 Ann Harding, NATSEM, University of Canberra Creating Socio-Economic Household Data at the Small Area Level An Introduction to Spatial Microsimulation Back to...