Prior NCGIA Research Programs

Prior NCGIA Research Programs National Center for Geographic Information & Analysis The National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis is an independent research consortium dedicated to basic research and education in geographic information science and its related technologies, including geographic information systems (GIS). The three member institutions are the University of California, Santa Barbara; the University at Buffalo; and the University of Maine. The consortium was formed in 1988 to respond to a competition for funding from the National Science Foundation. The three institutions have functioned independently since 1999, but they come together on a regular basis for cooperative initiatives that promote the original objectives of NCGIA. For more information, visit National Center for Geographic Information & Analysis Project Battuta Project Battuta 2000–2004 Principal Investigators: Sarah Nusser and Les Miller Iowa State University, Mike Goodchild and Keith Clarke University of California, Santa Barbara Project Battuta was an interdisciplinary research initiative to investigate the potential of emerging technologies and geospatial information resources to bring new functionalities to mobile field data collection. Research projects were undertaken in four main areas: Infrastructure designs to support use of geospatial information in heterogeneous mobile field computing environments Scientific software tools for sampling and conflation in limited field computing environments Wearable computing environments and interface designs Methodological approaches to using and collecting geospatial data in federal statistical surveys Research was prototyped and explored using a testbed environment. A variety of geospatial data sources were assembled for a small area in Iowa undergoing urban development and experiencing a reduction in wetlands and prime farmland. The concepts created under Project Battuta were developed with environmental and demographic applications in mind. The infrastructure design readily extends to less structured information gathering settings such as crisis management and law enforcement. For more information, visit Project Battuta Project Varenius Project Varenius 1997–1999 Principal Investigators: Michael F. Goodchild and Karen K. Kemp University of California, Santa Barbara David M. Mark SUNY, Buffalo and Max J. Egenhofer University of Maine, Orono Motivated by scientific, technical, and societal concerns, the objective of NCGIA’s Project Varenius was to advance geographic information science through basic research, education, and outreach. The research was aimed to: Serve science and scientists in two ways, focusing on areas in which our knowledge of formalizable geographic concepts is currently incomplete, and contributing to the development and refinement of tools and methods that scientists can use to study geographically distributed phenomena; Provide basic understanding of geographic concepts, which is required for the production of new technologies; Examines the impacts that these technologies have on individuals, organizations, and society, and that other digital technologies have in the context provided by geographic space. For more information, visit Project Varenius Project Gigalopolis Project Gigalopolis...

NGA

Strategic Enhancement of NGA’s Geographic Information Science Infrastructure Partners: University of Redlands (UR), lead institution University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), research partner Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), corporate partner National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) Started in 2000, Strategic Enhancement of NGA’€™s Geographic Information Science Infrastructure is focused on strategically enhancing the human and scientific infrastructure of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA). It involves a partnership between the University of Redlands (UR), the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), and the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA). This collaborative program links professionally-oriented graduate education, development of learning materials, and basic research in geographic information science (GIScience) through a number of initiatives designed to streamline the flow of knowledge and experience from research and education activities to practical implementation by NGA’s professionals.   For more information, visit Strategic Enhancement of NGA’s Geographic Information Science Infrastructure View Major NGA Grant Awarded to Goodchild &...

NGA Geospatial Feature Conflation

Geospatial Feature Conflation: Conceptual, Statistical, and Optimization Approaches Before Conflation After Conflation Real World Image Funding for Geospatial Feature Conflation: Conceptual, Statistical, and Optimization Approaches A two-year research award to Mike Goodchild and Martin Raubal 10/1/2009–€“9/30/2011, with potential for renewal until 9/30/2014 AbstractThis research proposes to: design a relational-algebra framework for conflating geospatial data from diverse sources; develop statistical and optimization approaches for multi-source data integration; and develop new methods of spatiotemporal reasoning. The research will extend across different time instants and different data standards. It pertains to NGA’s 2009 NURI solicitation Topic #4.3: “Harvesting and Using Data from Heterogeneous Digital Sources” and is also partially relevant to Topic #4.6: “Using Qualitative Descriptions of Spatio-Temporal Entities.” Four research themes will be addressed in this project: (i) development of a relational-algebra framework and formalization for conflating heterogeneous geospatial data; (ii) statistical and optimization approaches for conflating multiple geospatial data sources; (iii) provenance characterization and uncertainty evaluation in geospatial data conflation; and (iv) conflation-based approaches to spatiotemporal reasoning. By describing and modeling the process systematically in a consistent manner, theme (i) is critical for understanding major components in heterogeneous data conflation and for providing guidelines for choosing appropriate methods. Theme (ii) addresses the issues of non-optimality in existing conflation techniques and of increasing data accuracy using statistical and optimization approaches. Theme (iii) aims to represent uncertainty propagation and quality assessment in conflation through provenance characterization and modeling. Theme (iv) proposes to facilitate spatiotemporal reasoning by developing conflation-based approaches that take into consideration geospatial data from various sources to construct multiple constraints about geographic features in a multi-dimensional space-time context. Project findings will be disseminated through: (i) presentations at academic conferences and NGA meetings, (ii) publications in relevant journals, (iii) development of open-source prototypes using the proposed approaches, (iv) development of a Web service for conflation that can be incorporated into service-oriented architectures, and (v) applications of these techniques and approaches to several real-world case studies. The proposed research will provide a theoretical foundation to the integration of incompatible geospatial data. This problem is currently addressed by ad hoc solutions using dataset-sensitive techniques. It will develop novel approaches to implementing the conceptual framework, thus improving conflation results and enhancing spatiotemporal reasoning. The findings of this project will not only meet the requirement of creating higher-accuracy data from multiple sources, but will also offer a new direction for utilizing rich yet incompatible geospatial data to facilitate spatial reasoning. Its results will be of substantial benefit to NGA, scientific researchers, policy makers, and the general public. ObjectivesThe increasing and rapid development of remote sensing and other technologies as well as the growth of the Internet provide abundant opportunities to collect and access vast volumes...

VITAL

Vehicle Intelligence & Transportation Analysis Laboratory 1997–2004 Vehicle Intelligence & Transportation Analysis Laboratory Principal Investigator: Michael Goodchild University of California, Santa Barbara Director: Val Noronha University of California, Santa Barbara VITAL, the transportation wing of the National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis (NCGIA), engaged in research projects on transportation applications of geospatial information technologies until 2004. Projects covering transportation problems such as infrastructure management (from construction to maintenance and renewal), operations and traffic, transit planning, transportation security and Intelligent Transportation Systems were undertaken. Geospatial techniques applied to these problems include remote sensing, GPS, spatial data architecture, traffic microsimulation, and spatial optimization modeling. Projects were funded by the Federal and State governments and private firms. It now exists within the infrastructure of the National Consortium on Remote Sensing in Transportation (NCRST)—Infrastructure Management.   For more information, visit Vehicle Intelligence & Transportation Analysis...

NCRST

National Consortium on Remote Sensing in Transportation Principal Investigator: Michael Goodchild University of California, Santa Barbara Director: Val Noronha University of California, Santa Barbara The National Consortium on Remote Sensing in Transportation (NCRST) was established in 2000 by the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT), Research and Special Programs Administration (RSPA), in response to legislation in TEA-21. Four university-led consortia were set up in Environment, Infrastructure, Traffic Flows, and Hazards. UCSB led the Consortium on Infrastructure, partnering with Digital Geographic Research Corporation (DGRC), the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Iowa State University, TetraTech Inc, OrbImage, Florida DOT and the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.   The SAFETEA-LU bill of 2005 re-authorized funding for the program. USDOT’s Research and Innovative Technology Administration (RITA) advertized the new remote sensing program in 2006, and created seven consortia: three in freight congestion mitigation, three in infrastructure rehabilitation, and one in environment (DOT announcement). UCSB leads the consortium on Freight—Metropolitan Ports. For more information, visit National Consortium on Remote Sensing in...

Former Proposals for Research

In support of education initiatives, the Center for Spatial Studies worked cooperatively with researchers and instructors on and off campus to develop funding proposals that promise to enhance its objective of advancing spatial literacy for science and society. If you wish to join in these efforts, or have specific ideas to share, please contact Werner Kuhn. See summaries of recent spatial@ucsb submissions for funding, including: SCALE: Spatial Connections around our Local Environment NSF 09-549, Graduate STEM Fellows in K-12 Education (GK-12) June 2009 Critical Spatial Thinking in Science and Engineering NSF 09-519, Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT) September...