spatial@ucsb.local2016: Poster and Plenary Session

Jun 2, 2016 • Categories: Event | News | spatial@ucsb.local

spatial@ucsb.local2016 Spatial Information for Human Health Thursday, June 2, 2016 Corwin Pavilion Agenda Speakers Posters   In addition to a poster exhibit, the event featured the Channel Islands Regional GIS (CIRGIS) presentation of their 2016 high-resolution LiDAR elevation data program and the 2015 aerial imagery acquisition project. The Plenary Session, featured presentations by David Kerr (Sansum Diabetes Center) and Aaron Blackwell (UCSB, Dept.of Anthropology), moderated by Susan Cassels (UCSB, Dept. of Geography). Presenters discussed their research and gave their perspectives on how spatial information technologies can be applied to the study and enhancement of human health. While the theme is in regard to human health, posters and demos that illustrate the application of spatial thinking on any topic related to spatial studies were presented in the Poster Exhibit. Thirty-six posters and two demos were presented to a diverse audience from the private sector and academic communities. Speakers Aaron Blackwell, Ph.D. Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Santa Barbara Market Integration and the Health of Amazonian Amerindians Many Amazonian peoples are currently undergoing transitions from subsistence to market based economies. Along with these changes in subsistence, come changes in diet, disease, and sociality. Here, I discuss work with two Amazonian populations, the Shuar of Ecuador and the Tsimane of Bolivia. Both have lived traditionally through small scale horticulture, hunting, fishing, and gathering, and both groups have seen substantial changes in market integration over the past decade. However, these changes have not been distributed uniformly in space. Often, those living closer to or with greater access to towns and roads experience market integration more quickly, while those living more remotely continue traditional livelihoods. We use this spatial distribution as a proxy for changes through time, to examine how market integration impacts children’s growth, body composition, disease transmission, acculturation, fertility, and other health outcomes. Bio: Aaron Blackwell is Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is a human biologist and behavioral ecologist whose research examines health and life history in small scale Amazonian societies. His research examines how immune function develops in populations exposed to high levels of pathogens and how early life experiences shape health later in life in both small scale and industrialized populations. His research incorporates both field and laboratory work to examine biological outcomes. Blackwell’s other interests include examining how market integration affects health and development, senescence and aging, and ecological effects on parental investment and growth. David Kerr, M.D. FRCPE Director of Research, Sansum Diabetes Center A Diabetes Digital Village For clinicians, scientists and diabetes industries, the online diabetes #wearenotwaiting community is making it clear that the traditional approach to healthcare is not providing the quality and outcomes that are desired by adults and children...

spatial@ucsb.local2016—Call for Posters

May 20, 2016 • Categories: Event | spatial@ucsb.local

Submissions of demos or posters of research and creative works are invited for display at the annual spatial@ucsb.local2016 Poster and Plenary Session on Spatial Information for Human Health, which will be held on Thursday, June 2, 2016 at Corwin Pavilion. Representatives from the private sector and industry and campus-wide academics in the humanities, sciences, social sciences, and engineering programs are invited to showcase how spatial thinking facilitates research and creativity. Although the theme this year is on Spatial Information for Human Health, posters reflecting some aspect of spatial thinking on any topic will be accepted. To reserve your space for a poster or to indicate your attendance and join us for lunch, please RSVP to Karen Doehner (kdoehner@spatial.ucsb.edu) before May 20,...

spatial@ucsb.local2015: Poster and Plenary Session

Jun 2, 2015 • Categories: Event | Featured | News | spatial@ucsb.local

June 2, 2015—Corwin Pavilion, UCSB There is a spatial component at the core of all search. On one hand, search technologies rely on a spatial metaphor: We talk about going to our favorite websites, searching for fragments in an overwhelmingly large space of documents, images, and videos. On the other hand, geographic space is essential to index information, relying on the location of entities. Extending our 2014 Specialist Meeting on Spatial Search, open to the local community and campus wide, this event featured research posters from the local community. The agenda included the Channel Islands Regional GIS Panel Discussion and two keynote speakers, Pete Pirolli (Palo Alto Research Center) and Krzysztof Janowicz (Geography, UCSB).  The Agenda shows all details. Agenda Speakers Posters   Speakers Peter Pirolli, Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University Research Fellow, Interactive Intelligence Area Palo Alto Research Center Seeking Answers, Making Sense, Changing Lifestyles: Scientific and Engineering Models for Human-Information Interaction In this presentation, Pirolli discussed a series of increasingly complex human-information problems that have been addressed over the years by increasingly complex models of human psychology and behavior. The problems and contexts include information foraging, intelligence analysis, learning technical domains, and mastering changes in one’s own lifestyle. The models have been used to come to a deeper understanding of the cognitive ecology of human-information interaction in these contexts, to develop new user modeling techniques, with the aim of supporting the development of new human-information interaction techniques. Bio: Peter Pirolli is a Research Fellow in the Interactive Intelligence Area at the Palo Alto Research Center (PARC), where he has been pursuing studies of human information interaction since 1991. Prior to joining PARC, he was an Associate Professor in the School of Education at UC Berkeley. Pirolli received his doctorate in cognitive psychology from Carnegie Mellon University in 1985. He is an elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Association for Psychological Science, the American Psychological Association, the National Academy of Education, and the Association for Computing Machinery SIGCHI Academy. He is the author of Information Foraging Theory: Adaptive Interaction with Information. Krzysztof Janowicz, Ph.D., Institute for Geoinformatics (IFGI), University of Münster Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara Vague Cognitive Regions: Data-Synthesis-Driven Perspective The concepts of cognitive regions and places are notoriously difficult to manage in geographic information science. They arise from the complex interaction of individuals, society, and the environment, their exact delineation is challenging as borders are vague, membership of places within a region varies non-monotonically, and homogeneity and regularity between raters cannot be assumed. In a recent study, Montello and colleagues have devised a novel grid-based task in which participants rate the membership of individual cells to a given region. The...

spatial@ucsb.local2015—Call for Posters

Jun 2, 2015 • Categories: Event | News | spatial@ucsb.local

Submissions of demos or posters of research and creative works are invited for display at the annual spatial@ucsb.local2015 Poster and Plenary Session on Spatial Search, which will be held on Tuesday, June 2, 2015 at Corwin Pavilion. Representatives from the private sector and industry in the local community and campus-wide academics in the humanities, sciences, social sciences, and engineering programs are invited to showcase how spatial thinking facilitates research and creativity. Although the theme this year is on Spatial Search, posters reflecting some aspect of spatial thinking on any topic will be accepted. To reserve your space for a poster or to indicate your attendance and join us for lunch, please RSVP to Karen Doehner (kdoehner@spatial.ucsb.edu) before May 1,...