spatial@ucsb.local2019: Posters

spatial@ucsb.local2019 main page The Future of Island Oaks The Future of Island Oaks Laura Wolf, Sofie McComb, Claire Powers, Jazmine Uy, Alyssa Winchell Bren School of Environmental Management, University of California, Santa Barbara Description: Island oak (Quercus tomentella) is a rare oak species endemic to six islands in the California Island Archipelago (CAIA). Over a century of farming and grazing on the islands degraded core habitat and reduced island oak seedling recruitment. The species was listed as endangered by the IUCN in 2016. Most historical threats have been removed, though island oak regeneration is still restricted and there is concern that impending climate change poses an additional threat that may ultimately lead to extinction. Spatially-constrained, if the island oak’s range shifts or further deteriorates, alternative options are limited. We used MaxEnt, a species distribution model, to identify island oak’s bioclimatic niche on Santa Cruz, Santa Rosa, and Santa Catalina Islands and then predicted where that niche might exist through the end of the century under four climate change scenarios. Model outputs supported three main findings: (1) Island oak’s predicted bioclimatic niche was largely driven by soil moisture availability; (2) Santa Rosa Island had the most predicted suitable habitat under each climate change scenario, while predicted suitable habitat on Santa Cruz and Santa Catalina Islands was minimal; and (3) the bioclimatic habitat occupied by island oak varies substantially between the three islands studied. Improvements in life history information, legacy grazing patterns, and more finely downscaled climate data would substantially increase model validity. Research should focus on identifying mechanisms driving the variation in habitat occupied on each island, while restoration should prioritize habitat augmentation and seedling recruitment, to increase island oak’s resiliency to climate change.   Urbanization and its Effects on the Surrounding Environment                       Urbanization and its Effects on the Surrounding Environment: Case Study of Beijing and Lanzhou, China Guiyu Li, Yingyi He, Jiaxuan Lyu, Hoayu Shi Department of Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara Description: In the past decades, China has experienced massive economic growth and urban development. Changes in urban land cover, vegetation healthiness, and temperature distribution are crucial factors to understand the urbanization effects on the surrounding environment. Beijing and Lanzhou, two distinctive cities in terms of size and geographical location, are selected as our study objects. Using Landsat 5 and 8 images from 1993 to 2017 for the two cities, we train our algorithms to classify land cover types, including urban, vegetation, soil, and water. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) is calculated to measure vegetation health. Temperatures are derived using the radiance of the thermal band. Land cover classes are used for NDVI and temperature analysis. Based...

spatial@ucsb.local2019: Poster and Plenary Session

May 13, 2019 • Categories: Event | Featured | News | spatial@ucsb.local

  Thursday, June 6, 2018 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Corwin Pavilion Invitation & Agenda Speakers Posters The annual spatial@ucsb.local2019 Poster and Plenary Session will be held on Wednesday, June 6, 2018 at Corwin Pavilion, from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. This year’s theme for the event is Spatial Data for Smarter Cities. Keynotes will be delivered by Mahnoosh Alizadeh (Electrical and Computer Engineering, UC Santa Barbara), Konstadinos (Kostas) Goulias (Dept. of Geography, UC Santa Barbara), and Kurt Shellhause (Water Resources Engineer, Kasraie Consulting). Representatives from the private sector and industry and campus-wide academics in the humanities, sciences, social sciences, and engineering programs will showcase how spatial thinking facilitates research and creativity. A total of 38 posters were submitted for viewing. See agenda, speaker bios and abstracts, and a sampling of posters above. The poster session will begin at 12:30 p.m. and lunch will be served in tandem. Lunch will continue to be served and posters may be viewed until 2:30 p.m. For planning purposes, we request that you RSVP to kdoehner@spatial.ucsb.edu before Thursday, May 30. We invite you, your colleagues, and your students to participate in this event as attendees to the plenary and/or viewers of the posters. We look forward to your participation and encourage you to share this invitation with others who may be interested in...

spatial@ucsb.local2018: Poster and Plenary Session

Jun 6, 2018 • Categories: Event | Featured | News | spatial@ucsb.local

Wednesday, June 6, 2018 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Corwin Pavilion Invitation & Agenda Speakers Posters The annual spatial@ucsb.local2018 Poster and Plenary Session was held on Wednesday, June 6, 2018 at Corwin Pavilion, from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. This year’s theme for the event was Improving Information Accuracy for Extreme Events. Keynotes were delivered by Jessica White (Direct Relief International), Chris Renschler (Dept. of Geography, University at Buffalo), and Brian Heath (Ventura County Fire Department). Representatives from the private sector and industry and campus-wide academics in the humanities, sciences, social sciences, and engineering programs were invited to showcase how spatial thinking facilitates research and creativity. A total of 53 posters were submitted for viewing. See agenda, speaker bios and abstracts, and a sampling of posters...

spatial@ucsb.local2018: Posters

spatial@ucsb.local2018 main page Can Navigation Ability Be Improved? Can Navigation Ability Be Improved? Chuanxiuyue (Carol) He and Mary Hegarty Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara Growth (versus fixed) mindset in navigation ability refers to a person’s implicit theory that their navigation ability can (or cannot) be improved. Previous studies have shown that people with growth mindset in general are more likely to approach challenges and value efforts so that they are more likely to have better achievements (Dweck, 1998; Dweck, 2006). This study aims to investigate the relations between the mindset in navigation ability, self-reported sense of direction, everyday navigation behaviors, and people’s actual navigation abilities, including perspective-taking, constructing survey knowledge (estimating directions to destinations), and navigation efficiency (finding shortcut to navigate). Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Map Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Map Benchmark Maps Effects of Climate Change and Urbanization on Joshua Trees Effects of Climate Change and Urbanization on Joshua Trees Shelly Hill, Moriah Mason, and Christine Pang Yucca brevifolia, more commonly known as the Joshua tree, is a giant yucca endemic to the desert grasslands and shrublands of the Mojave Desert. This species is an important source of food and habitat for small mammals, birds, reptiles, insects, and spiders. However, the Joshua tree is restricted to locations with cold winters, hot summers, and little precipitation, resulting in a small inhabited range. This limited habitat distribution is likely to be affected by factors such as urbanization and climate change. With changes in the Joshua tree’s distribution, there will be subsequent effects on the many organisms that depend on Yucca brevifolia as well. With these factors in mind, we hope to visually quantify the negative impacts the factors of urbanization and climate change will have on the this species. Expanding UCSB Sustainability's Urban Orchard Program Expanding UCSB Sustainability’s Urban Orchard Program Thomas Crimmel, Adriana Ocasio, Yixue Meng, Thomas Smith The University of California’s Food Access and Security survey found that nineteen percent of the UC community meets the USDA’s definitions of “very low” food security while twenty-three percent met the definition for “low” food security (Martinez et al. 2016). UCSB Sustainability has combined this need with recent funding towards urban agriculture to launch an on campus urban orchard project that supplies AS Food Bank with fresh produce to give back to the students. Seven citrus trees have already been successfully potted in Storke Plaza. In working to better understand where to expand the Urban Orchard project, our team is finding a way to make this process more expedient and the project more successful. In comparing and weighting data covering restricted areas, solar insolation, potable water accessibility, and proximity to other sites, geospatial...

spatial@ucsb.local2018: Call for Posters

Mar 21, 2018 • Categories: Event | Featured | News | spatial@ucsb.local

Submissions of demos or posters of research and creative works are invited for display at the annual spatial@ucsb.local2018 Poster and Plenary Session on Improving Maps for Extreme Events, which will be held on Wednesday, June 6, 2018 at Corwin Pavilion. Representatives from the private sector and industry and campus-wide academics in the humanities, sciences, social sciences, and engineering programs are invited to showcase how spatial thinking facilitates research and creativity. Although the theme this year is on Improving Maps for Extreme Events, posters reflecting some aspect of spatial thinking on any topic will be accepted. To reserve your space for a poster or to indicate your attendance and join us for lunch, please RSVP to Karen Doehner (kdoehner@spatial.ucsb.edu). Deadline for poster reservation is Monday, May...