spatial@ucsb.local2019: Posters

spatial@ucsb.local2019 main page

The Future of Island Oaks
Oakology_poster

The Future of Island Oaks

Laura Wolf, Sofie McComb, Claire Powers, Jazmine Uy, Alyssa Winchell

Bren School of Environmental Management, University of California, Santa Barbara
Description:
Island oak (Quercus tomentella) is a rare oak species endemic to six islands in the California Island Archipelago (CAIA). Over a century of farming and grazing on the islands degraded core habitat and reduced island oak seedling recruitment. The species was listed as endangered by the IUCN in 2016. Most historical threats have been removed, though island oak regeneration is still restricted and there is concern that impending climate change poses an additional threat that may ultimately lead to extinction. Spatially-constrained, if the island oak’s range shifts or further deteriorates, alternative options are limited. We used MaxEnt, a species distribution model, to identify island oak’s bioclimatic niche on Santa Cruz, Santa Rosa, and Santa Catalina Islands and then predicted where that niche might exist through the end of the century under four climate change scenarios. Model outputs supported three main findings: (1) Island oak’s predicted bioclimatic niche was largely driven by soil moisture availability; (2) Santa Rosa Island had the most predicted suitable habitat under each climate change scenario, while predicted suitable habitat on Santa Cruz and Santa Catalina Islands was minimal; and (3) the bioclimatic habitat occupied by island oak varies substantially between the three islands studied. Improvements in life history information, legacy grazing patterns, and more finely downscaled climate data would substantially increase model validity. Research should focus on identifying mechanisms driving the variation in habitat occupied on each island, while restoration should prioritize habitat augmentation and seedling recruitment, to increase island oak’s resiliency to climate change.
Urbanization and its Effects on the Surrounding Environment
Urbanization poster
Urbanization and its Effects on the Surrounding Environment: Case Study of Beijing and Lanzhou, China

Guiyu Li, Yingyi He, Jiaxuan Lyu, Hoayu Shi

Department of Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara
Description:

In the past decades, China has experienced massive economic growth and urban development. Changes in urban land cover, vegetation healthiness, and temperature distribution are crucial factors to understand the urbanization effects on the surrounding environment. Beijing and Lanzhou, two distinctive cities in terms of size and geographical location, are selected as our study objects. Using Landsat 5 and 8 images from 1993 to 2017 for the two cities, we train our algorithms to classify land cover types, including urban, vegetation, soil, and water. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) is calculated to measure vegetation health. Temperatures are derived using the radiance of the thermal band. Land cover classes are used for NDVI and temperature analysis. Based on the results, both Lanzhou and Beijing experienced urban expansion over the study period. Especially in Beijing, both its scale and urbanization rate are greater compared to those in Lanzhou due to the demographic, topographic, and economic differences. Urbanization influences the total amount of vegetation but does not directly cause a decrease in vegetation healthiness. The temperatures in both cities have increasing trends. The temperatures of urban and soil areas are higher than those of vegetation and water. In Beijing, the urban areas have the highest temperature, and the hot spots correspond with the urban expansion, reflecting a positive urban heat island effect. In contrast, in Lanzhou, the soil areas have higher temperatures than urban areas, which indicates a negative heat island effect. In conclusion, urbanization leads to a positive impact on temperature change but does not decrease vegetation health. Vegetation and water will mitigate the urban heat island effect.

Perspective Taking is Affected by Array, Perspective Shift, and pointing Quadrant
Perspective Taking

Perspective Taking is Affected by Array, Perspective Shift, and pointing Quadrant

Peri Gunalp, Elizabeth Chrastil, Mary Hegarty

University of California, Santa Barbara
Description:

Previous research on spatial perspective taking ability has used psychometric tests like the Perspective Taking Test (PTT). The present experiment introduces an experimental task that systematically varies the magnitude of the initial perspective shift and of the pointing response, and examines the effects of the addition of a person in the array. Performance on this computerized PTT indicated that accuracy increased with inclusion of a person in the array compared to a control condition, decreased with increases in initial perspective shift, and was best when pointing to the front in the imaged perspective. These perspective shift and pointing response patterns were consistent regardless of whether a person was included in the task array, suggesting that participants do not modify their strategy when a person is included. Regardless of the size of the initial perspective shift or pointing quadrant, participants seem to be engaging mental transformation and visualization processes.

Academic Discipline's Interactions with Spatial Aptitude
Academic Disciplines and Spatial Aptitude
Academic Discipline’s Interactions with Spatial Aptitude

Emily Cao, Adora Du, Luke Speier, Chuanxiuyue (Carol) He, Mary Hegarty

Hegarty Spatial Cognition Lab, Department of Psychology, University of California, Santa Barbara
Description:
Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics are academic disciplines that have been associated with spatial aptitude.Visualizing objects, being aware of spatial relationships, having knowledge of movement and speed, in addition to analyzing complicated systems are all important skills for being successful in STEM disciplines. This study tested the spatial aptitudes of participants from different academic disciplines such as engineering, physical sciences, and social sciences in order to see whether or not there was an actual difference in visuospatial performance. The results found that participants in engineering and STEM disciplines had slightly stronger spatial aptitudes.
Analysis of Students' Familiarity with UCSB Campus
Student's Unfamiliarity Poster

Analysis of Students’ Familiarity with UCSB Campus

Shupeng Wang, Zilong Liu, Eddie Nguyen

Department of Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara
Description:
UCSB campus is approximately 989 acres so it can be easy to be unfamiliar with the campus. In this project, we address areas of unfamiliarity within the UCSB campus and explore three possible associations that might influence familiarity on the UCSB campus: Campus Resource Availability, Accessibility, and Activity. The Campus Resource Availability factor highlights how availability of the campus resources, such as computer labs and foods, affect familiarity. The Accessibility factor indicates the influence of accessibility to the campus buildings on familiarity. The Activity factor shows how familiarity is influenced by students’ activity around campus.
The Effects of Drought on Land Fallowing and Crop Health in Agriculture
The Effects of Drought on Land Fallowing and Crop Health in Agriculture

Brody Brand, Jessica Martinez, McKenzie Sime

Departments of Geography and EEMB, University of California, Santa Barbara
Description:
In this project, we aimed to discern the effects of both drought severity and water source on agriculture. Looking at three counties in April of 2011, 2014, and 2018, we assessed the percentage of cropland that had been fallowed and the health of crops using an NDVI and an NDWI. We found that Linn County, Oregon, which has no shortage of water, had the least fallowed land and the healthiest crops. In Merced County and Imperial County, California, we found that there was some variation in the percentage of fallowed land with drought severity and no variation in crop health with drought. Water source did not seem to have an effect for the 2014 drought.
Effects of Human Land Use on Invasive Species Density in Hawaii
Hawaii's Invasive Species

Effects of Human Land Use on Invasive Species Density in Hawaii

Juli Ann Lingenberg, Noelle Pruett, McKenzie Sime

Departments of EEMB and Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara
Description:
In this project, we aimed to discover which land use type had invasive species observations in the highest density in Hawaii. Using a land use map from the Hawaii State Land Use Commission (LUC) and species observations for 15 invasive species from iNaturalist, we found the density of observations in each of our four land use types (urban, rural, agriculture, and conservation). Urban areas had the highest density (8x the average). We then looked at buffers around the urban areas of differing distances and found that the further a buffer went out from an urban area, the lower the density of observations became.
The City of Thousand Oaks Community Energy Action Plan
Thousand Oaks Energy Plan

The City of Thousand Oaks Community Energy Action Plan: Residential Energy Consumption

Carrie Simmons, GIS Aide

City of Thousand Oaks Public Works Department
Description:

This analysis is a guiding component to the City of Thousand Oaks Community Energy Action Plan (CEAP). The main goals of this plan are to reduce fossil fueled based energy usage and increase energy efficiency and resilience in The City of Thousand Oaks. This data and analysis will be able to inform City staff on what areas or demographics should be targeted and how to strategically implement programs and outline steps to lower overall energy consumption. Staff plan to use this energy consumption data over a variety of parameters such as building age, solar panel usage, income, population density, home ownership versus renters, and much more. Over time this analysis may become part of the Cities Climate Action Plan which has a goal of addressing activities to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG). This analysis is an initial step to seeing how we can use this data to create programs and policies to meet our climate goals.

Communities of Interest at Different Scales
Communities of Interest at Different Scales

Communities of Interest at Different Scales

Daniel W. Phillips

Department of Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara
Description:
When drawing boundaries of electoral districts, officials commonly rely on four criteria besides equal population: contiguity, compactness, respect for administrative regions, and respect for communities of interest (COIs). That last criterion is not as easily defined, as what exactly constitutes a COI is open to interpretation. This research evaluates the merits of one potential method for identifying and defining COIs, by surveying residents and asking them to draw the boundaries of their COI on a map. Those areas covered by many respondents’ drawings would thus constitute the core of people’s cognitive COI. A study conducted in Santa Barbara County, California demonstrates that this method results in clearly-defined and coherent COIs that somewhat correspond to the existing electoral districts. The study also reveals that survey participants, despite the fact that all of them live in the same district at three different levels of government, conceive of separate urban and rural COIs. Furthermore, the extent of the map given to participants has a large effect on the size of the COI that they draw. These results indicate the importance of the urban-rural dichotomy and the effects of scale in defining what a COI really is.
2018 Posters
spatial@ucsb.local2018 poster

spatial@ucsb.local2019: Poster and Plenary Session

 

spatial@ucsb.local2019

Thursday, June 6, 2018

Corwin Pavilion

Invitation & Agenda Speakers Posters

The annual spatial@ucsb.local2019 Poster and Plenary Session was held on Wednesday, June 6, 2018 at Corwin Pavilion.

This year’s theme for the event was Spatial Data for Smarter Cities. Keynotes were delivered by Mahnoosh Alizadeh (Electrical and Computer Engineering, UC Santa Barbara), Konstadinos (Kostas) Goulias (Dept. of Geography, UC Santa Barbara), and Kurt Shellhause (Water Resources Engineer, Kasraie Consulting). Representatives from the private sector and industry and campus-wide academics in the humanities, sciences, social sciences, and engineering programs had the opportunity to showcase how spatial thinking facilitates research and creativity. A total of 38 posters were submitted for viewing. Some of these have been posted to this website.

spatial@ucsb.local2018: Poster and Plenary Session

spatial@ucsb.local2018

Wednesday, June 6, 2018

9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Corwin Pavilion

[button link=”http://spatial.ucsb.edu/wp-content/uploads/local2018_agenda-1.pdf” type=”icon” newwindow=”yes”]Invitation & Agenda[/button] [button link=”http://spatial.ucsb.edu/wp-content/uploads/local2018_speakers-abstracts-1.pdf” type=”icon” newwindow=”yes”]Speakers[/button] [button link=”http://spatial.ucsb.edu/2018/local-extreme-events/posters” type=”icon” newwindow=”yes”]Posters[/button]

The annual spatial@ucsb.local2018 Poster and Plenary Session was held on Wednesday, June 6, 2018 at Corwin Pavilion, from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

This year’s theme for the event was Improving Information Accuracy for Extreme Events. Keynotes were delivered by Jessica White (Direct Relief International), Chris Renschler (Dept. of Geography, University at Buffalo), and Brian Heath (Ventura County Fire Department). Representatives from the private sector and industry and campus-wide academics in the humanities, sciences, social sciences, and engineering programs were invited to showcase how spatial thinking facilitates research and creativity. A total of 53 posters were submitted for viewing.

See agenda, speaker bios and abstracts, and a sampling of posters above.

spatial@ucsb.local2018: Posters

spatial@ucsb.local2018 main page

[learn_more caption=”Can Navigation Ability Be Improved?” state=”open”] spatial@ucsb.local2018 poster

Can Navigation Ability Be Improved?

Chuanxiuyue (Carol) He and Mary Hegarty

Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara

Growth (versus fixed) mindset in navigation ability refers to a person’s implicit theory that their navigation ability can (or cannot) be improved. Previous studies have shown that people with growth mindset in general are more likely to approach challenges and value efforts so that they are more likely to have better achievements (Dweck, 1998; Dweck, 2006). This study aims to investigate the relations between the mindset in navigation ability, self-reported sense of direction, everyday navigation behaviors, and people’s actual navigation abilities, including perspective-taking, constructing survey knowledge (estimating directions to destinations), and navigation efficiency (finding shortcut to navigate).
[/learn_more] [learn_more caption=”Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Map” state=”close”] spatial@ucsb.local2018 poster

Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Map

Benchmark Maps
[/learn_more] [learn_more caption=”Effects of Climate Change and Urbanization on Joshua Trees” state=”close”] spatial@ucsb.local2018 poster

Effects of Climate Change and Urbanization on Joshua Trees

Shelly Hill, Moriah Mason, and Christine Pang

Yucca brevifolia, more commonly known as the Joshua tree, is a giant yucca endemic to the desert grasslands and shrublands of the Mojave Desert. This species is an important source of food and habitat for small mammals, birds, reptiles, insects, and spiders. However, the Joshua tree is restricted to locations with cold winters, hot summers, and little precipitation, resulting in a small inhabited range. This limited habitat distribution is likely to be affected by factors such as urbanization and climate change. With changes in the Joshua tree’s distribution, there will be subsequent effects on the many organisms that depend on Yucca brevifolia as well. With these factors in mind, we hope to visually quantify the negative impacts the factors of urbanization and climate change will have on the this species.
[/learn_more] [learn_more caption=”Expanding UCSB Sustainability’s Urban Orchard Program” state=”close”] spatial@ucsb.local2018 poster

Expanding UCSB Sustainability’s Urban Orchard Program

Thomas Crimmel, Adriana Ocasio, Yixue Meng, Thomas Smith

The University of California’s Food Access and Security survey found that nineteen percent of the UC community meets the USDA’s definitions of “very low” food security while twenty-three percent met the definition for “low” food security (Martinez et al. 2016). UCSB Sustainability has combined this need with recent funding towards urban agriculture to launch an on campus urban orchard project that supplies AS Food Bank with fresh produce to give back to the students. Seven citrus trees have already been successfully potted in Storke Plaza. In working to better understand where to expand the Urban Orchard project, our team is finding a way to make this process more expedient and the project more successful. In comparing and weighting data covering restricted areas, solar insolation, potable water accessibility, and proximity to other sites, geospatial analysis can be used to develop a map identifying the ideal locations to expand UCSB Sustainability’s Urban Orchard project.
[/learn_more] [learn_more caption=”How to test hypotheses with geographic prisms” state=”close”] spatial@ucsb.local2018 poster

How to test hypotheses with geographic prisms

Thomas Crimmel, Thomas Hervey, Pyry Kettunen, Sara Lafia, Christina Last, Behzad Vahedi, Jingyi Xiao, & Werner Kuhn

The Center for Spatial Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara

Our goal is to understand how to test research hypotheses spatially. A hypothesis says that a process explains observed properties of participants. We use this idea to operationalize the metaphor of a geographic prism as follows:
1. Locate the observed process participants with respect to other participants. 2. Map the observed properties of the participants for these locations. 3. Correlate the observed properties with other participant properties.
[/learn_more] [learn_more caption=”Hurricane Harvey: Spatial Analysis Using Twitter” state=”close”] spatial@ucsb.local2018 poster

Hurricane Harvey: Spatial Analysis Using Twitter

Gabriel Hernandez, Lisa Nguyen, Annie Satalich, Alyssa White

University of California, Santa Barbara

Hurricane Harvey is considered by many to be the first major storm of the social media age (Time 2017). For many in the path of the storm, emergency services, such as 911, were down; responders were overwhelmed due to the numerous amount of calls made during that time. Many victims of the storm resorted to Twitter in order to request emergency services, which created real time information about locations of victims, locations of shelters, and number of victims. For the first time, people resorted to social media as a means of rescue, a phenomena which is spatially interesting to map out and analyze.
[/learn_more] [learn_more caption=”Isla Vista Housing Guide” state=”close”] spatial@ucsb.local2018 poster

Isla Vista Housing Guide

Edwin Guterriez, Zhuo Tang, Juliet Bachtel, Jerald Zhao

Department of Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara and Wuhan University

Isla Vista is a 1.86 square mile community that contains a population of over 20,000 people. The majority of Isla Vista’s residents are transient students of the University of California, Santa Barbara or Santa Barbara City College. It can be difficult to fully understand the dynamics of Isla Vista when deciding on where to rent an apartment. And our project aims to provide a guide people can rely on to find the housing that is best suited to them.
[/learn_more] [learn_more caption=”LEED Adoption Factors in the USA” state=”close”] spatial@ucsb.local2018 poster

LEED Adoption Factors in the USA

Brian Cortez, Thomas Crimmel, Ian Logan, Steve Kang

University of California, Santa Barbara

Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, is a tool to rate the environmental performance of a building. Created by the US Green Building Council (USGBC) in 2000, LEED offers a progressive rating system (certified, silver, gold, and platinum) for projects that can be carried out at any stage of a buildings life.
[/learn_more] [learn_more caption=”LiDAR Applications for Survey and Mapping at the Ancient Maya Center of El Pilar” state=”close”] spatial@ucsb.local2018 poster

LiDAR Applications for Survey and Mapping at the Ancient Maya Center of El Pilar

Thomas Crimmel, James Bacon, Sherman W. Horn III, Anabel Ford

MesoAmerican Research Center, University of California, Santa Barbara

The El Pilar Archaeological Reserve for Maya Flora and Fauna is a large Classic Maya center straddling the border of Belize and Guatemala. The acquisition of aerial Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data in 2012 allowed for a boots-on-the-ground settlement survey to be efficiently executed within the 20 km2 of the reserve. Fieldwork from 2014-17 covers 10 km2 or 50% of El Pilar’s area and led to the verification and mapping of 7 major centers and ~1,320 smaller cultural features. Now that 50% or 10 Km2 of the study area has been surveyed and mapped, it can be confidently said that LiDAR is a highly effective tool in identifying and mapping cultural features under the canopy.
[/learn_more] [learn_more caption=”Route Planning and Situated Navigation in Collaborative Wayfinding” state=”close”] spatial@ucsb.local2018 poster

Route Planning and Situated Navigation in Collaborative Wayfinding

Crystal Bae

Department of Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara

Participants collaborated on a task to both plan and execute a route in a novel environment. In the planning phase of this study, each dyad was given start and end points on a paper map between which they had to devise a route to take. In the second part of the study, each dyad was taken to the study site where they navigated together between the origin and destination points while being video-recorded and GPS-tracked. Using this rich repository of video-recorded interaction alongside collected data on participants’ navigational planning and performance, I investigate strategies of social role-taking, the collaborative use of environmental cues and references, and the communication of uncertainty in wayfinding.
[/learn_more] [learn_more caption=”S.B. Riparian Canopy Coverage: Comparing Restored, Non-Urban, and Urban Sites” state=”close”] spatial@ucsb.local2018 poster

S.B. Riparian Canopy Coverage: Comparing Restored, Non-Urban, and Urban Sites

Carolyn Welch, Maddie Cook, Gus Van Kirk, and Mary Capcap

University of California, Santa Barbara

This project looked at the potential success of riparian habitat restoration by calculating the percent canopy coverages (PCC) of trees within riparian zones. Riparian zones are classified as the interfaces between land and rivers. They provide a wide range of ecosystem services that include reducing runoff, increasing soil stability, improving water quality, and creating habitat space for native animal and plant species. Urban development in the Santa Barbara County has reduced riparian habitat abundance. These ecosystems are currently under threat.
[/learn_more] [learn_more caption=”Shade Structures of the Future: Innovative Skin Cancer Solutions” state=”close”] spatial@ucsb.local2018 poster

Shade Structures of the Future: Innovative Skin Cancer Solutions

Julian Herren, Christian Lance Relleve and Grace Corsi

University of Southern California

“SunSmart” is a skin cancer intervention program initiated by faculty in the USC Keck School of Medicine in collaboration with the USC Spatial Sciences Institute. The current interdisciplinary efforts aim to reduce sun exposure in the playgrounds of local Los Angeles (LA) elementary schools through educational outreach and design solutions.
[/learn_more] [learn_more caption=”Southern California Fire & Earthquake Hazards Map” state=”close”] spatial@ucsb.local2018 poster

Southern California Fire & Earthquake Hazards Map

Jesse Wickizer, Maps.com
[/learn_more] [learn_more caption=”U.S. Coast Guard Port Angeles Map” state=”close”] spatial@ucsb.local2018 poster

U.S. Coast Guard Port Angeles Map

Benchmark Maps
[/learn_more] [learn_more caption=”Which trees cost us most? How can GIS help us manage or replace them?” state=”close”] spatial@ucsb.local2018 poster

Which trees cost us most? How can GIS help us manage or replace them?

George Naugles, MA, RCE, CalBRE

This project seeks to demonstrate a GIS approach to identify the most allergenic street trees growing within a city, based on data assembled by a botanical GIS contractor and reported by a publicly available GIS (Geographic Information System).
[/learn_more]

spatial@ucsb.local2018: Call for Posters

spatial@ucsb.local2018Submissions of demos or posters of research and creative works are invited for display at the annual spatial@ucsb.local2018 Poster and Plenary Session on Improving Maps for Extreme Events, which will be held on Wednesday, June 6, 2018 at Corwin Pavilion. Representatives from the private sector and industry and campus-wide academics in the humanities, sciences, social sciences, and engineering programs are invited to showcase how spatial thinking facilitates research and creativity.

Although the theme this year is on Improving Maps for Extreme Events, posters reflecting some aspect of spatial thinking on any topic will be accepted. To reserve your space for a poster or to indicate your attendance and join us for lunch, please RSVP to Karen Doehner (kdoehner@spatial.ucsb.edu). Deadline for poster reservation is Monday, May 7.

spatial@ucsb.local17: Posters

spatial@ucsb.local2017 main page

[learn_more caption=”Spatial Discovery at UCSB” state=”open”] spatial@ucsb.local17 poster

Spatial Discovery at UCSB

Sara Lafia and Werner Kuhn

Center for Spatial Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara

UCSB’s data site provides geographihc search by extent. “Where in the world is campus research happening?”

The University of California, Santa Barbara, in partnership with the UCSB Library and Esri, has launched an instance of ArcGIS Open Data to showcase campus research. Datasets and publications across departments, such as Marine Biology, Archaeology, and Political Science, are geographically referenced, discoverable, and linked.
[/learn_more] [learn_more caption=”Core Concepts of Spatial Information: Towards Question-Based Spatial Computing” state=”close”] spatial@ucsb.local17 poster

Core Concepts of Spatial Information: Towards Question-Based Spatial Computing

Behzad Vahedi and Werner Kuhn

Center for Spatial Studies and Department of Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara

What is a core concept?
Concepts to interpret spatial data or computations (Kuhn, 2012). These are lenses through which users can look at world and Conceptualize spatial information.
There are two sets of core concepts, Content Concepts which are lenses to look at the world with, and Quality Concepts that are lenses to look at other concepts with. Location is a base concept, used to define other concepts. Each core concept comes with a set of core computations.
Concepts along with their computations play the role of Abstract Data Types (ADT) in computer science.
[/learn_more] [learn_more caption=”Accessibility and Location Theory of California Farmers Markets” state=”close”] spatial@ucsb.local17 poster

Accessibility and Location Theory of California Farmers Markets

Lila Kübler-Dudgeon, Riley Anderson, Mitchell Johnson, Oscar Leon

Department of Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara

Since 1970, the amount of farmers markets has increased over 2000%. Farmers markets reduce the use of fossil fuels, increase access to fresh produce, boost local economies, and enhance the degree of social interaction through shopping (3).The National Farmers Market Summit Report in 2008 stated that farmers markets “must increase consumer access in low-income areas”, suggesting that farmers markets do not adequately serve low-income citizens (4). This is problematic because low socioeconomic areas tend to buy cheaper, less healthy foods (3). However, between 1975 and 2015, the number of farmer’s markets in urban neighborhoods has risen from 340 to over 8000 (3).
[/learn_more] [learn_more caption=”Sensitivity of Chaparral Obligate Seeders in Los Angeles and Ventura Counties” state=”close”] spatial@ucsb.local17 poster

Sensitivity of chaparral obligate seeders in Los Angeles and Ventura Counties

Shane L. Dewees, Stephanie A. Ma, and Carla M. D’Antonio

Department of Environmental Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara

Chaparral, the dominant vegetative community in Southern California, is characterized by sclerophyllous, evergreen shrubs. These shrubs can be categorized into three main reproductive strategies based on their responses to the infrequent fire regime characteristic for the region: obligate seeding, obligate resprouting, and facultative resprouting. Obligate seeders typically occur in more xeric and nutrient poor sites, where obligate resprouters are generally less likely to succeed. However, obligate seeders are predicted to be negatively affected by the shortened fire return intervals that are occurring as a result of human caused fire within chaparral settings.
[/learn_more] [learn_more caption=”Mexico City Land Cover Change from 1985 to 2016″ state=”close”] spatial@ucsb.local17 poster

Mexico City Land Cover Change from 1985 to 2016

Hilda Rocha and Andrew Cardinal

Department Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara

Mexico City is the capital and the most populous city of Mexico1. In 2005 its whole metropolitan zone registered 19.2 million inhabitants2. The city has expanded over three different entities: the Federal District where it was founded originally, the State of Mexico (which now contains over 50% of the city’s population), and a portion of the State of Hidalgo that recently has been incorporated into the metropolitan zone2. As of 2016, the population of Mexico City is estimated to be 8.9 million1, while the entire metropolitan area’s is estimated to be 21.1 million1, making it the most populous metropolitan area in the Western Hemisphere1. It is located in the Valley of Mexico, at an altitude of 2,240 meters (7,350 feet)1. We analyzed land cover trends over the last three decades within certain areas of the metropolitan area.

[/learn_more] [learn_more caption=”Harmful Algal Blooms in the Chesapeake Bay” state=”close”] spatial@ucsb.local17 poster

Harmful Algal Blooms in the Chesapeake Bay

Grant Catlin, Johnny Roberts, and Anthony Farris

Department Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara

The United States’ largest estuary, the Chesapeake Bay, is home to a vast and complex ecosystem, which supports a diverse range of habitats and provides a crucial economic role for local communities. Every year, predominantly in the summer months, harmful algal blooms (HABs) occur, negatively impacting economic, ecological, and human health. HABs occur when colonies of algae grow rapidly, fueled by warm water temperatures and excess nutrients such as phosphorous and nitrogen. Tracking and monitoring HABs is very challenging, as they are highly variable in nature and can pop up and disappear in a number of hours. We utilized MODIS and AVHRR satellite data as a method to track blooms over the course of July through September 2014-16, and analyzed the effectiveness of using chlorophyll and sea surface temperature as a proxy for these blooms. By linking past records of HAB events with locations of agriculture facilities and their phosphorous and nitrogen watershed outputs, we were able to combine remote sensing techniques with GIS, and ultimately provide a product that displays a time series trend of HAB hotspots in the Chesapeake Bay.

[/learn_more] [learn_more caption=”Mapping Emergency Response with Twitter” state=”close”] spatial@ucsb.local17 poster

Mapping Emergency Response with Twitter

Briant J. Fabela, Thomas Anaya, Jason Granados

Department Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara

Thousands of the incidents occur each year the Fire Department responds to, but is there any relation as to where these and incidents happen and why? This project is intended to find out. We derived spatial information from more than 44,000 tweets.

We correlated these dispatch calls with time, incident type, and other metadata in order to explore spatiotemporal and socioeconomic patterns.

After projecting the point data we created onto a map, we were able to determine there are spatial patterns and correlations between certain types of incidents and location around southern Santa Barbara County, specifically Isla Vista and Goleta.

[/learn_more] [learn_more caption=”Phenological Synchrony in Quercus Lobata” state=”close”] spatial@ucsb.local17 poster

Phenological Synchrony in Quercus Lobata

David Hyon, Jacobo Pereira-­Pacheco, Zachary Snider, Cristina Soto-­Balderas

Department Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara

Phenological synchrony is a phenomenon in which individuals time the initiation of life cycle events together. In this study the first two steps of the phenological synchrony hypothesis [1] were tested involving valley oak (Quercus Lobata)

1.“Temperature during the spring correlated with homogeneity in microclimatic conditions throughout the study area.”

2.“Differences in microclimatic heterogeneity drive differences in phenological variability”

[/learn_more] [learn_more caption=”How Did Recent Rains Affect Soil Salinity Across UCSB Campus After Years of Drought?” state=”close”] spatial@ucsb.local17 poster

How Did Recent Rains Affect Soil Salinity Across UCSB Campus After Years of Drought?

John D. Roberts, Armando X. Munoz, Grant Catlin, Anthony Farris

Department Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara

Background:

UCSB irrigates 90% of landscapes using reclaimed water. Reclaimed water is high in salt content that accumulates over time. Salt accumulation can cause salinization, which has detrimental effects on soils and vegetation. Project in 2015-16 measured electrical conductivity across various sites at UCSB to determine the salinity of soil.</>

Objectives:

Acquire electrical conductivity (EC) values to use as a proxy for saline by conducting surveys using GEM2. Use GIS to compare values with 2015-16 eata to determine how soil saline residue derived from reclaimed water has changed after recent rains following years of drought.

Hypothesis:

We expect that the soil electrical conductivity will be lower across all sites in 2017 compared to the 2015-16 due to higher rainfall this season compared to the previous 4 seasons. We also expect that Commencement Green Site might show a difference in values due to different mechanisms affecting the soil salinity.

[/learn_more] [learn_more caption=”Where are you? The Effect of Uncertainty & its Visual Representation on Location Judgments in GPS-like Displays” state=”close”] spatial@ucsb.local17 poster

Where are you? The Effect of Uncertainty & its Visual Representation on Location Judgments in GPS-like Displays

Alinda Friedman1, Mary Hegarty2, Alexander P. Boone2 and Trevor J. Barrett2

1University of Alberta & 2University of California, Santa Barbara

Question: Do non-experts understand positional uncertainty?

Positional uncertainty can be represented as:

  • A 95% confidence interval (circle)
  • A probability density function (fade)

Do people believe they are equally likely to be anywhere inside the blue dot? Do they assume they are more likely to be at the center of the blue dot? Are they influenced by the size of the blue dot, which indicates uncertainty of position?

[/learn_more] [learn_more caption=”Using GIS to Clean the Air, Improving Stewardship of Santa Barbara Channel’s Gifts to Ventura” state=”close”] spatial@ucsb.local17 poster

Using GIS to Clean the Air, Improving Stewardship of Santa Barbara Channel’s Gifts to Ventura

George Naugles

A Spatial Problem…

Some of the cleanest air in the world, as well as most of the water used in the City of Ventura arrives via the Santa Barbara Channel. Diverting surface runoff and pumping scarce groundwater to irrigate city trees, Ventura currently contaminates pristine Pacific air with over 7,000 allergenic wind-pollinated trees, compromising’ quality of life for 20% to 25% of the population for many weeks each year. Allergenic pollen producers are projected to increase airborne pollen levels 30% to 400%, by 2050, due to increased carbon dioxide levels. Various scientists have documented gradually increasing incidence of allergies in children since 1950. That is without even considering today’s trees’ future growth. So pollen allergies are expected to affect the quality of life of more people more over time in the future.

[/learn_more] [learn_more caption=”2017 Eastern Sierra Avalanche Analysis” state=”close”] spatial@ucsb.local17 poster

2017 Eastern Sierra Avalanche Analysis

Joey Conway, Kevin Anderson, Jack Sargent, and Stephen Fetterly

Department of Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara

The 2017 winter was one of record breaking snowfall in the Eastern Sierra. Our goal was to determine what variables were correlated with avalanches reported on the Eastern Sierra Avalanche Center (ESAC) website: slope, aspect, elevation, and vegetation. We analyzed the differences between public and professional avalanche observations to ensure consistency in the crowd-sourced data. Using these variables, we developed a descriptive map of high, medium and low potential avalanche risk areas throughout the Eastern Sierra mountain range. With this information, skiers and mountaineers alike can recognize more dangerous and avalanche prone locations.

[/learn_more] [learn_more caption=”Isla Vista Safest Path Finder” state=”close”] spatial@ucsb.local17 poster

Isla Vista Safest Path Finder

Samuel Fall, Lauren Haas, Lilian Yang, and Brian Hsiao

Department of Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara

Most navigation systems are programmed to promote the shortest distance between a start and an endpoint. Distance and time may be important to a pedestrian, but safety should be taken into consideration, as well.

Isla Vista is a 1/2 square mile unincorporated community within Santa Barbara County. It is estimated that 8,000 pedestrians leave and enter Isla Vista each day, making foot traffic safety of great importance (County of Santa Barbara, pp 2-32). Through a comprehensive raster map of street illumination, crime location data, sidewalk availability, and location of intersections, we will attempt to portray how safety-dependent navigation varies from classic shortest path navigation and how the shortest path may differ from the safest path.

[/learn_more] [learn_more caption=”Characteristics of Moulin Density and Location on the Greenland Ice Sheet 2012 & 2015″ state=”close”] spatial@ucsb.local17 poster

Characteristics of Moulin Density and Location on the Greenland Ice Sheet 2012 & 2015

Julia Ebert & Lilian Yang

Department of Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara

The Greenland ice sheet has been experiencing increasing surface melt (Bhattacharya et al., 2009; Box, 2013; Fettweis et al., 2011). Most of the surface melt goes through supraglacial
streams and lake systems that drain through moulins. Moulins are circular, near-vertical sinkholes in ice sheet and glacier systems in which water enters from the surface. This drainage of water by moulins provides an increase in meltwater to supraglacial and subglacial environments, thus increasing basal sliding of outlet glaciers. It is important to understand the spatial distribution and seasonal progression of these hydrologic feature by mapping with fine resolution and great spatial coverage, allowing for a broader understanding of sheet-wide reactions to increased melting (Chu, 2013). This projects seeks to glimpse into the spatial changes of moulins on the Greenland Ice sheet from 2012 to 2015 by using satellite imagery and GIS.

[/learn_more] [learn_more caption=”Mapping Gray Whale Migration to Evaluate Shipping Lanes and Reduce Whale Ship Strikes” state=”close”] spatial@ucsb.local17 poster

Mapping Gray Whale Migration to Evaluate Shipping Lanes and Reduce Whale Ship Strikes

Jeremy Neill, Linnea Palmstrom, Daniel Park, Bronson Reich

University of California, Santa Barbara

The gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus) makes an annual migration of up to 13,600 miles round trip from their winter breeding grounds off Mexico to their summer feeding grounds off Alaska. This may be the longest migration of any mammal. The North American population is 22,000. Threats to their population include ship strikes (boat collisions), entanglement in fishing gear and climate change. This project looks at gray whale migration, how this intersects with shipping lanes, modeling their migratory behavior, and ways to reduce ship strike.

[/learn_more]

spatial@ucsb.local17: Poster and Plenary Session

spatial@ucsb.local2017

Environmental Conflict Resolution in the Santa Barbara Channel

Thursday, June 8, 2017

10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Corwin Pavilion

[button link=”http://spatial.ucsb.edu/eventfiles/local17/local17-invitation.pdf” type=”icon” newwindow=”yes”]Invitation & Agenda[/button][button link=”http://spatial.ucsb.edu/eventfiles/local17/Speakers-bios-abstracts-2017.pdf” type=”icon” newwindow=”yes”] Speakers [/button][button link=”http://spatial.ucsb.edu/2017/conflict-resolution-sb-channel/posters/” type=”icon” newwindow=”no”]Posters[/button]

The annual spatial@ucsb.local17 Poster and Plenary Session that showcases how spatial thinking facilitates research and creativity was held on Thursday, June 8, 2017 at Corwin Pavilion. With Rockney Rudolph presiding, the Channel Islands Regional GIS Collaborative (CIRGIS) held its annual meeting; Grace Goldberg moderated the Plenary Session on Environmental Conflict Resolution in the Santa Barbara Channel, and 38 posters were submitted for viewing and discussion after the meeting.

Representatives from the private sector and industry and campus-wide academics in the humanities, sciences, social sciences, and engineering programs participated in this event.

Photo credit: George Naugles

Speakers

Carrie Kappel, Ph.D.
Associate Research Scientist, National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS), University of California, Santa Barbara

Planning for Aquaculture in the Southern California Bight, with Models, Maps, and Real Stakeholders

Marine spatial planning (MSP) is increasingly used to reduce conflicts and environmental impacts and promote sustainable use of marine ecosystems. We developed a modeling framework to coordinate the development of multiple emerging ocean uses while balancing multiple existing management objectives. In this talk I will demonstrate its value for guiding offshore aquaculture (bivalve, finfish and kelp farming) development in relation to existing sectors and environmental concerns (wild-capture fisheries, view shed quality, benthic pollution and disease spread) in the Southern California Bight. We identified >250,000 MSP solutions that show that aquaculture can be highly compatible with other ocean uses while generating significant seafood supply and billions of dollars in revenue with minimal impacts. To illustrate, I’ll discuss how these results are being used to inform offshore shellfish aquaculture planning, and stakeholder engagement in Ventura, CA.

Bio: Carrie Kappel is an Associate Research Scientist at University of California’s National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis. She earned a B.S. with Honors in Biology from Brown University and a Ph.D. in Biology from Stanford University. A marine conservation biologist and community ecologist by training, she has worked in coral reefs, kelp forests and rocky intertidal systems and now uses collaborative synthesis science to develop conservation solutions that protect marine ecosystems and enhance human well-being.

Morgan Visalli
MESM, Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary

Whales, Ships, and Missiles in the Santa Barbara Channel:
Solving Complex Environmental Problems with Innovative Spatial Tools

The Santa Barbara Channel region has an exceptional abundance and diversity of marine species, and provides important habitat for Gray, Blue and Humpback whales. The area is also heavily transited by large cargo ships and serves as a military testing ground. These dynamics have resulted in fatal ship strikes on endangered whales and conflicts among ocean users. This talk will explore how spatial tools and mapping are used to help solve complex environmental problems with diverse stakeholders.

Bio: Morgan Visalli is a California Sea Grant Fellow (2015) and a graduate of the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management (MESM 2014). She has worked on mapping and spatial analysis projects at the Sustainable Fisheries Group, NOAA, and as a thru-hiker on the California Coastal Trail. She is excited about marine spatial planning, connecting science and policy, and reducing marine debris.

Moderator: Grace Goldberg
Director of Operations
SeaSketch & McClintock Lab, University of California, Santa Barbara

Bio: Grace Goldberg coordinates activities at the SeaSketch and McClintock Lab, and serves as an interface between the lab and collaborators. She is trained as a scientist, interested in research questions that include human users in marine ecosystems, with relevance to spatial management and real conservation goals. Goldberg received her M.S. in Marine Systems and Conservation from Stanford University, completing a thesis on sea turtle spatial dynamics to inform sustainable development. She spent time at Hopkins Marine Station as a scientific diver, and in the Earth Systems Program, which focuses on interdisciplinary environmental problem solving, systems thinking, and communication.