spatial@ucsb.local2018: Poster and Plenary Session

Jun 6, 2018 • Categories: Event | Featured | spatial@ucsb.local

Wednesday, June 6, 2018 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Corwin Pavilion Invitation & Agenda Speakers Posters The annual spatial@ucsb.local2018 Poster and Plenary Session was held on Wednesday, June 6, 2018 at Corwin Pavilion, from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. This year’s theme for the event was Improving Information Accuracy for Extreme Events. Keynotes were delivered by Jessica White (Direct Relief International), Chris Renschler (Dept. of Geography, University at Buffalo), and Brian Heath (Ventura County Fire Department). Representatives from the private sector and industry and campus-wide academics in the humanities, sciences, social sciences, and engineering programs were invited to showcase how spatial thinking facilitates research and creativity. A total of 53 posters were submitted for viewing. See agenda, speaker bios and abstracts, and a sampling of posters...

spatial@ucsb.local2018: Posters

spatial@ucsb.local2018 main page Can Navigation Ability Be Improved? Can Navigation Ability Be Improved? Chuanxiuyue (Carol) He and Mary Hegarty Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara Growth (versus fixed) mindset in navigation ability refers to a person’s implicit theory that their navigation ability can (or cannot) be improved. Previous studies have shown that people with growth mindset in general are more likely to approach challenges and value efforts so that they are more likely to have better achievements (Dweck, 1998; Dweck, 2006). This study aims to investigate the relations between the mindset in navigation ability, self-reported sense of direction, everyday navigation behaviors, and people’s actual navigation abilities, including perspective-taking, constructing survey knowledge (estimating directions to destinations), and navigation efficiency (finding shortcut to navigate). Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Map Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Map Benchmark Maps Effects of Climate Change and Urbanization on Joshua Trees Effects of Climate Change and Urbanization on Joshua Trees Shelly Hill, Moriah Mason, and Christine Pang Yucca brevifolia, more commonly known as the Joshua tree, is a giant yucca endemic to the desert grasslands and shrublands of the Mojave Desert. This species is an important source of food and habitat for small mammals, birds, reptiles, insects, and spiders. However, the Joshua tree is restricted to locations with cold winters, hot summers, and little precipitation, resulting in a small inhabited range. This limited habitat distribution is likely to be affected by factors such as urbanization and climate change. With changes in the Joshua tree’s distribution, there will be subsequent effects on the many organisms that depend on Yucca brevifolia as well. With these factors in mind, we hope to visually quantify the negative impacts the factors of urbanization and climate change will have on the this species. Expanding UCSB Sustainability's Urban Orchard Program Expanding UCSB Sustainability’s Urban Orchard Program Thomas Crimmel, Adriana Ocasio, Yixue Meng, Thomas Smith The University of California’s Food Access and Security survey found that nineteen percent of the UC community meets the USDA’s definitions of “very low” food security while twenty-three percent met the definition for “low” food security (Martinez et al. 2016). UCSB Sustainability has combined this need with recent funding towards urban agriculture to launch an on campus urban orchard project that supplies AS Food Bank with fresh produce to give back to the students. Seven citrus trees have already been successfully potted in Storke Plaza. In working to better understand where to expand the Urban Orchard project, our team is finding a way to make this process more expedient and the project more successful. In comparing and weighting data covering restricted areas, solar insolation, potable water accessibility, and proximity to other sites, geospatial...

spatial@ucsb.local2018: Call for Posters

Mar 21, 2018 • Categories: Event | Featured | spatial@ucsb.local

Submissions of demos or posters of research and creative works are invited for display at the annual spatial@ucsb.local2018 Poster and Plenary Session on Improving Maps for Extreme Events, which will be held on Wednesday, June 6, 2018 at Corwin Pavilion. Representatives from the private sector and industry and campus-wide academics in the humanities, sciences, social sciences, and engineering programs are invited to showcase how spatial thinking facilitates research and creativity. Although the theme this year is on Improving Maps for Extreme Events, posters reflecting some aspect of spatial thinking on any topic will be accepted. To reserve your space for a poster or to indicate your attendance and join us for lunch, please RSVP to Karen Doehner (kdoehner@spatial.ucsb.edu). Deadline for poster reservation is Monday, May...

spatial@ucsb.local17: Posters

spatial@ucsb.local2017 main page Spatial Discovery at UCSB Spatial Discovery at UCSB Sara Lafia and Werner Kuhn Center for Spatial Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara UCSB’s data site provides geographihc search by extent. “Where in the world is campus research happening?” The University of California, Santa Barbara, in partnership with the UCSB Library and Esri, has launched an instance of ArcGIS Open Data to showcase campus research. Datasets and publications across departments, such as Marine Biology, Archaeology, and Political Science, are geographically referenced, discoverable, and linked. Core Concepts of Spatial Information: Towards Question-Based Spatial Computing Core Concepts of Spatial Information: Towards Question-Based Spatial Computing Behzad Vahedi and Werner Kuhn Center for Spatial Studies and Department of Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara What is a core concept? Concepts to interpret spatial data or computations (Kuhn, 2012). These are lenses through which users can look at world and Conceptualize spatial information. There are two sets of core concepts, Content Concepts which are lenses to look at the world with, and Quality Concepts that are lenses to look at other concepts with. Location is a base concept, used to define other concepts. Each core concept comes with a set of core computations. Concepts along with their computations play the role of Abstract Data Types (ADT) in computer science. Accessibility and Location Theory of California Farmers Markets Accessibility and Location Theory of California Farmers Markets Lila Kübler-Dudgeon, Riley Anderson, Mitchell Johnson, Oscar Leon Department of Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara Since 1970, the amount of farmers markets has increased over 2000%. Farmers markets reduce the use of fossil fuels, increase access to fresh produce, boost local economies, and enhance the degree of social interaction through shopping (3).The National Farmers Market Summit Report in 2008 stated that farmers markets “must increase consumer access in low-income areas”, suggesting that farmers markets do not adequately serve low-income citizens (4). This is problematic because low socioeconomic areas tend to buy cheaper, less healthy foods (3). However, between 1975 and 2015, the number of farmer’s markets in urban neighborhoods has risen from 340 to over 8000 (3). Sensitivity of Chaparral Obligate Seeders in Los Angeles and Ventura Counties Sensitivity of chaparral obligate seeders in Los Angeles and Ventura Counties Shane L. Dewees, Stephanie A. Ma, and Carla M. D’Antonio Department of Environmental Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara Chaparral, the dominant vegetative community in Southern California, is characterized by sclerophyllous, evergreen shrubs. These shrubs can be categorized into three main reproductive strategies based on their responses to the infrequent fire regime characteristic for the region: obligate seeding, obligate resprouting, and facultative resprouting. Obligate seeders typically occur in more xeric and nutrient poor sites, where obligate resprouters are generally less...

spatial@ucsb.local17: Poster and Plenary Session

May 15, 2017 • Categories: Event | Featured | News | spatial@ucsb.local

spatial@ucsb.local2017 Environmental Conflict Resolution in the Santa Barbara Channel Thursday, June 8, 2017 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Corwin Pavilion Invitation & AgendaSpeakersPosters The annual spatial@ucsb.local17 Poster and Plenary Session that showcases how spatial thinking facilitates research and creativity was held on Thursday, June 8, 2017 at Corwin Pavilion. With Rockney Rudolph presiding, the Channel Islands Regional GIS Collaborative (CIRGIS) held its annual meeting; Grace Goldberg moderated the Plenary Session on Environmental Conflict Resolution in the Santa Barbara Channel, and 38 posters were submitted for viewing and discussion after the meeting. Representatives from the private sector and industry and campus-wide academics in the humanities, sciences, social sciences, and engineering programs participated in this event. Photo credit: George Naugles Presenter: Carrie Kappel Presenter: Morgan Visalli Speakers Carrie Kappel, Ph.D. Associate Research Scientist, National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS), University of California, Santa Barbara Planning for Aquaculture in the Southern California Bight, with Models, Maps, and Real Stakeholders Marine spatial planning (MSP) is increasingly used to reduce conflicts and environmental impacts and promote sustainable use of marine ecosystems. We developed a modeling framework to coordinate the development of multiple emerging ocean uses while balancing multiple existing management objectives. In this talk I will demonstrate its value for guiding offshore aquaculture (bivalve, finfish and kelp farming) development in relation to existing sectors and environmental concerns (wild-capture fisheries, view shed quality, benthic pollution and disease spread) in the Southern California Bight. We identified >250,000 MSP solutions that show that aquaculture can be highly compatible with other ocean uses while generating significant seafood supply and billions of dollars in revenue with minimal impacts. To illustrate, I’ll discuss how these results are being used to inform offshore shellfish aquaculture planning, and stakeholder engagement in Ventura, CA. Bio: Carrie Kappel is an Associate Research Scientist at University of California’s National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis. She earned a B.S. with Honors in Biology from Brown University and a Ph.D. in Biology from Stanford University. A marine conservation biologist and community ecologist by training, she has worked in coral reefs, kelp forests and rocky intertidal systems and now uses collaborative synthesis science to develop conservation solutions that protect marine ecosystems and enhance human well-being. Morgan Visalli MESM, Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Whales, Ships, and Missiles in the Santa Barbara Channel: Solving Complex Environmental Problems with Innovative Spatial Tools The Santa Barbara Channel region has an exceptional abundance and diversity of marine species, and provides important habitat for Gray, Blue and Humpback whales. The area is also heavily transited by large cargo ships and serves as a military testing ground. These dynamics have resulted in fatal ship strikes on endangered whales and conflicts among ocean users. This talk will explore...