Thank you to Spatial Lightning Talk 2018 presenters

The UCSB Center for Spatial Studies hosted another great round of Spatial Lightning Talks this year, with a whole new batch of spatially-relevant topics. Eight speakers took the challenge to “enlighten us, but make it quick!”

Many new and returning faces in the crowd had the opportunity to hear a lively group of speakers and make new connections across campus. This year, there was a 2-minute question and answer period after each 3-minute presentation, allowing the audience to participate more in the program.

Spatial Lightning Talks 2018

Two speakers, Paul Wilson (formerly of GE / MapFrame) and James Caesar (UCSB Campus Emergency Manager) spoke about the recent Thomas Fire and mudslides. Paul called for map-minded people in the local community to band together and improve the state of emergency mapping; James shared some of his real, on-the-ground experience responding to the recent fire and mudslide events.

Geography Professor Keith Clarke taught us about a local piece of history just around the bend at Honda Point. Thomas Crimmel continued the geographers and history theme with his (very!) abridged history of the digital desktop.

Joshua Kuntzman, graduate student at the Gervitz School of Education, pushed us to think more about what it takes to facilitate true interdisciplinary work through the UCSB Crossroads program. Jeremy Douglass, Assistant Professor of English, gave us a run-through of his project Panelcode.

Spatial Lightning Talks 2018

Graduate student Lily Cheng made everyone stop and think about their well-developed
‘paw preferences’, and aviation consultant William Yim gave everyone a new perspective on focus in photography.

This event was organized by Crystal Bae, bidding adieu to Kitty Currier who has done a great job organizing in years past. If you are interested in presenting a 3-minute lightning talk at next year’s event, get in touch with Crystal anytime. Videos of this year’s talks will be posted on the Spatial Center website once they become available.

Spatial Lightning Talks 2018

spatial@ucsb welcomes Pyry Kettunen

Pyry KettunenPyry Kettunen is visiting the Center for Spatial Studies as a Fulbright Junior Scholar Feb–Jul 2018 for a research project on collaborative geospatial thinking. He is a Senior Research Scientist in the Department of Geoinformatics and Cartography at the Finnish Geospatial Research Institute (FGI) that is part of the National Land Survey of Finland (NLS-FI). He received his M.Sc. (Tech.) in Geoinformatics from Helsinki University of Technology in 2008 and D.Sc. (Tech.) in Geoinformatics from Aalto University School of Engineering in 2014. His studies included an exchange year at the EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland, and four months as a visiting grant researcher at the LMC lab of the Université Paris Descartes.

Kettunen’s research has concentrated on human spatial cognition of landmarks and wayfinding as well as on development and usability of varied kinds of cartographic applications. His current research interests include interpersonal spatial cognition, cartographic animation, and web maps. His personal interests are in endurance sports in nature, choir or group singing when possible, and arts in general.

Minor in Spatial Studies

moons-thumb

Course requirements Complete Course Listing

View Minor flyer

Please note: Geography majors are eligible for the Minor in Spatial Studies.

The Minor in Spatial Studies has been transferred from the Center for Spatial Studies to the Department of Geography for advisory support for students seeking to complement their disciplinary majors with a Minor in Spatial Studies. Spatial Studies is framed as an interdisciplinary minor that recognizes the many disciplinary origins of innovations in spatial reasoning, representation, and analysis. All advising is now done through the Department of Geography.

General information or document submission: General advising: Ally Foot; Academic advising: Konstadinos Goulias.

With upper-division courses from more than two-dozen disciplines listed for the minor, students can tap into a creative mix of ideas and tools to enhance their majors and career orientations with spatial perspectives. For the Minor in Spatial Studies, a student selects one of three focus areas that allies most clearly with his/her areas of disciplinary and/or career interest. These include: (a) Spatial Thinking, (b) Space and Place, and (c) Spatial Science. The curricula for these areas of study include a breadth of courses that reflect the pervasive nature of spatial reasoning across diverse fields of knowledge.

Focus in Spatial Thinking

The Spatial Thinking focus emphasizes spatial cognition and reasoning associated with problem solving and representation, and applications of both elementary and complex reasoning processes in different domains of human activity and knowledge development. This focus represents a concentration on the science of spatial learning at individual and societal levels, and on the mental associations that facilitate learning about and functioning within human and natural environments.

Focus in Spatial Science

The Spatial Science focus emphasizes the analysis and visualization of information, featuring courses that build methodological and technological competencies for documenting space-time patterns and processes about phenomena in the physical world as well as about behavior and its consequences in the human world. In the design disciplines (including some branches of engineering) the focus is on problem solving and product development that frequently entails the (re)arrangement of spatial entities and documentation of the consequences thereafter.

Focus in Space and Place

The Space and Place focus builds on courses that apply spatial reasoning and visualization in the humanities. Examples include creative and aesthetic renderings (e.g., stories, visualizations, sounds, and fine arts), the design of lived-in environments that reflect and accommodate human values and activities, the documentation and assessment of affinity to sense of place and region, and communication through use of spatial metaphor and spatialized languages.

Geography W12 (Maps and Spatial Reasoning), the required common course for the minor, treats the fundamental science of mapping, including the underlying mathematics for spatial transformations and projections, exposure to computerized graphics and mapping systems, and the use of maps as research tools to document and communicate information as well as to solve problems. The widespread and increasing use of online and handheld mapping technologies over the past decade has embedded the map into expressions of spatial and geographical metaphor, spatiality, and place identity that render geo-spatial literacy as an appropriate foundation for informed citizenship and problem solving in many disciplines and careers. Geog. W12 is taught online and holds a weekly lab.

How to Become a Minor in Spatial Studies

Have you completed the Minor? Please evaluate our program in our Survey Questionnaire

Although students do not need to declare the minor, students interested in the interdisciplinary Minor in Spatial Studies may seek consultation in the Department of Geography (Ellison 1837). The advisor’s office hours will be established once the campus is reopened (possibly September 2021); currently, appointments for remote advising may be made by email: AllyFoot.

Students who meet course requirements may request certification to graduate with a Minor in Spatial Studies by completing the Course Requirements for Minor in Spatial Studies before meeting with an advisor in the Center for Spatial Studies.

Once a student has completed the required courses, he or she can deliver the completed Course Requirements Form for review and approval by the advisor in the Department of Geography at 1837 Ellison. Once approved, the academic advisor will sign a Clearance Form for the Minor in Spatial Studies and deliver it to the registrar.

Minor Regulations

The following conditions must be met for official recognition of the minor:

  • Students must consult the General Catalog for prerequisites to all listed courses.
  • All courses to be applied to the minor must be completed on a letter-grade basis. This includes all courses that are applied to the minor, offered by the Department of Geography as well as those offered by other departments.
  • No more than 3 upper-division courses can be taken from a single department
  • At least 20 upper-division quarter units are completed for the minor. Waivers cannot reduce the requirement below this number.
  • Substitutions and waivers are subject to approval by the advisor for the Spatial Studies Minor.
  • The UC grade-point average in ALL applicable upper-division courses, including those in excess of minimum requirements, is 2.0 or higher.
  • No more than 5 upper-division units overlap between the Spatial Studies Minor and the upper-division portion of a student’s major(s) or other minor(s). If the overlap with a student’s major(s) exceeds 5 upper-division units, then completion of the Spatial Studies Minor will not be formally recognized; if the overlap with other minor(s) exceeds 5 upper-division units, then only the first minor reported will be noted on the student’s transcript.
  • Students must have completed at least 12 of the upper-division requirements for the minor while registered as a UCSB student.
  • Once a student has completed the course work outlined above, he or she can pick up, complete, and submit a Course Requirements for Minor in Spatial Studies checklist at the Geography Department (1837 Ellison).
  • The sponsoring department reports completion of the minor prior to the posting of the degree.

Lightning Talks

Intended as an inspirational session, the Lightning Talks are a series of delicious, rapid-fire talks on spatially-flavored topics. Each presenter is allotted three minutes to develop a topic. This event is currently organized by Rui Zhu.

2020 Lightning Talks
View All Videos | View Program

2020’s Spatial Lightning Talks were one to remember. As we munched on Chipotle, our listeners from across campus and the community were regaled with three-minute talks that ran the gamut, and that captured our attention for an hour. Speakers had the challenge to present a new topic to the audience in only three minutes, after a which a loud (electronic) bell would stop their thought in its tracks – because it was question time! Read the full summary of the event here.

Dr. Keith Clarke: “Why Map Rozel Point?” (video) Dr. Clayton Nall: “Why Partisans Don’t Sort” (videoJoel Salzman: “The Best Places to Vote in California” (videoNick Triozzi: “Drones and Thermal Imagery for Archaeological Survey” (videoMargaret Fisher: “Taking Up Space: Large(st) Animals and the Collective Literary Unconscious” (videoPaul Wilson: “Where Do We Live?” (videoEduardo Romero: “High Frequency Radar in the Santa Barbara Channel” (videoLouis Graup: “Fire and Water: A Spatial Connection” (videoDr. Wendy Meiring: “Collaborations Through Time and Space” (video) Thomas Crimmel: “Ancient Real Estate at the Maya Center of El Pilar” (videoPratik Raghu: “Spaces of Hope Under State Terrorism” (videoZoe Hinck: “Mapping Professional Networks” (video)

2019 Lightning Talks
View All Videos | View Program

New space, same (but never old!) event, 2019’s Spatial Lightning Talks were one to remember. As they munched on sandwiches and pizza, our listeners from across campus were regaled with three-minute talks that ran the gamut, and that captured our attention for over an hour. Speakers had the challenge to present a new topic to the audience in only three minutes, after a which a loud (electronic) bell would stop their thought in its tracks – because it was question time! Read the full summary of the event here.

John Lee: Race and Space on an American College Campus, 1886-1888 (video) Thomas Hervey: Travel Spaces and their Stories (video) Skona Brittain: Space-Filling Curves (video) Mike Johnson: An R-based Ecosystem for Earth System Data (video) George Legrady: 3D Data Visualization Fundamentals from MAT 259 Course (video) Keith Clarke: Where is Nowhere? (video) Ethan Turpin & David Gordon: An Interactive Fire, Water and Climate Model (video) Dan Montello: Fifty-Four Forty or Fight! (video) Greg Hillis: Mandalas: Buddhist Maps of Perfection (video) Aaron Bagnell: Fuzzy Oceans: Clustering Water Masses to Overcome Local Sampling Bias (video) Ken Dunkley: COOL Terroir: Place and the Character and Quality of Food and Beverages (video) Tom Ekman: Exploring a Watershed with Mexican Youth (video). View all videos on YouTube:

2018 Lightning Talks
View All Videos | View Program The UCSB Center for Spatial Studies hosted another great round of Spatial Lightning Talks, with a whole new batch of spatially-relevant topics. Eight speakers took the challenge to “enlighten us, but make it quick!” Many new and returning faces in the crowd had the opportunity to hear a lively group of speakers and make new connections across campus. This year, there was a 2-minute question and answer period after each 3-minute presentation, allowing the audience to participate more in the program. Read the full summary of the event here. Keith Clarke: The Honda Point Disaster (video) Jeremy Douglass: Panelcode (video) Paul Wilson: Mapping Thomas (video) Joshua Kuntzman: UCSB Crossroads (video) Lily Cheng: Left Hand, Right Hand (video) James Caesar: Thomas Fire: Don’t Fight the Scenario (video) Thomas Crimmel: The Abridged History of the Digital Desktop (video) William Yim: Focus View all videos on YouTube:
2017 Lightning Talks
View All Videos | View Flyer | View Program The sixth annual Lightning Talks event was held on Tuesday, February 28 at the Mosher Alumni House. In this fast-paced, hour-long event 16 speakers from across and beyond campus presented 3-minute talks falling under the broad theme of “space/spatial,” ranging in scope from drone mapping to smartphone organization, offshore wind energy planning, and a history of UCSB campus planning. The event, organized by Kitty Currier, was standing-room-only, with about 80 attendees from diverse departments campus wide, as well as from the local community. Dan Montello: The Un-Spatial Talk (video) Thomas Crimmel: Your Smartphone, Organize It (video) Elizabeth J. Hambleton: Acoustic Spatialization (video) Rui Zhu: IChing and Geography (video) Paul Wilson: The Geography in Cancer (video) James Caesar: UCSB Emergency Preparedness Programs (video) Dennis Whelan: A Lovely Mess– A Brief History of UCSB Campus Plans (video) John Loman: UCSB Communications Network Mapping and Documentation (video) Marc Mayes: Mysteries of a Breathing Biosphere (video) Frank Pendleton: Offshore Wind Energy Planning Waldo Tobler: A New Companion for Mercator Skona Brittain: Time for Space (video) Karly Marie Miller: Using Space As a Proxy for Time to Study Tourism and Fisheries (video) Daniel Phillips: Defining the Community of Interest as a Cognitive Region (video) William F. Yim: A Day in Ventura (video) Eduardo Romero : Drone Mapping (video) View all videos on YouTube:
2016 Lightning Talks
View All Videos | View Program Fifteen speakers presented their work and perspectives in a 3-minute format, making the fifth annual Lightning Talks a great success. Crystal Bae organized this event, which took place at Student Resources Building Multipurpose Room on February 29, 2016. Alexander Boone: Navigation and the Human Stress Response (video) Susan Cassels: Syphilis, Circuit Parties, and Circular Migration (video) James Caesar: Emergency Management and the Use of Information and Maps (video) Keith Clarke: How to Prove the Earth is Round (video) Tommie Dickie: The Iditarod: 1000 Mile Alaskan Test of Courageous Dogs and Mushers (video) Jeremy Douglass: Page Spaces, Remixed: 500+ Excursions through House of Leaves Pages (video) Song Gao: Earth’s Biggest Seasonal Human Migration on a Map (video) Adam Grosshans: Navigating a Volume: The Seattle Public Library (video) Jordan Hastings: What’s in a Gazeteer? (video) Donald Janelle: UCSB Spatial Archives @ eScholarship (video) Sara Lafia: Degrees of Separation: Measuring Musicians and Places (video) Sijie Loo: Space Traveling in Paintings (video) Kevin Mwenda: How High can Mosquitoes Get? (video) Celeste Pilegard: Training Spatial Skills with Video Games (video) William F. Yim: Coast Redwoods in California (video) View all videos on YouTube:
2015 Lightning Talks
View All Videos | View Flyer | View Program Fourteen new and returning speakers made the fourth annual Lightning Talks a success. Kitty Currier organized the event, which took place at Mosher Alumni House on February 25, 2015. Tommy Dickey and Hot Rod Linkin, Polar Bears and Great Pyrenees Dogs: A Matter of Scale! (video) David Gordon, Linking Sound, Image and Place (video) Skona Brittain, More Than Four Colors (video) Yingjie Hu, Metadata harmonization in spatial data infrastructures (video) Todd Bryan, Wedding Cake Geoprocessing for Web GIS (video) Amy Shadkamyan-Talamantes, UCSB Business Continuity (video) Selena Daly, Mapping the Italian Avant-Garde: Futurism in Space and Time (1909-1944) (video) Bernard Comrie, Go West, Young Man: Consistency and Inconsistency in Cognitive Representations of Cardinal Directions (video) Keith C. Clarke, Why isn’t the US metric? (video) Jeremy Douglass, Experimental Game Spaces: virtual visions, architectures, and dimensions (video) William F. Yim, Chinese Calligraphy (video) David A. Hallowell, First-Grade Students and Geometric Diagrams: What do they notice? (video) Kim Yasuda, Light Works: Isla Vista (video) Steve Miley, Beyond the Locked Gate (video) View all videos on YouTube:
2014 Lightning Talks
View All Videos | View Flyer | View Program The third annual Lightning Talks featured a lineup of 11 new and returning speakers, presenting to a full room at Mosher Alumni House on February 25, 2014. Kitty Currier organized the event. Keith C. Clarke, The Four Washington Meridians (video) Tommy Dickey, Teddy, and Linkin, Brave Arctic Gold Rush Dogs (video) Song Gao, Spatial Questions Collected from GIS HelpDesk (video) Margaret R. Tarampi, A Little Pictorial Space Can Change Your Perception of Art (video) William Yim, Airport Terminal Designs (video) Crystal Bae, Lessons from the Road: Cross-Country by Bicycle (video) Paul Wilson, Whale Traffic Control (video) Heather Burte, Individual Differences and the Neural Bases of Allocentric-Headings (video) Andrea Ballatore, Computing the Spirit of Place (video) George Legrady, Image, Interaction and Representation: Some Artistic Projects that Address Space (video) Jeremy Douglass, Navigating Narratives as Networks (video) View all videos on YouTube:
2013 Lightning Talks
View All Videos | View Flyer | View Program Kitty Currier organized this edition of Lightning Talks, held at the Mosher Alumni House over the lunch hour on Wednesday, February 27, 2013. The brave cast of inspirational speakers included: Tommy Dickey, Chasing Ocean Eddies and Pyrenean Sheep! (video) Mary Hegarty, How I Became a Spatial Thinker (video) Song Gao, Spatio-Temporal Patterns from Mobile Phone Data (video) Jim Caesar, Emergency Preparedness (video) Don Janelle, Convergent Places—Warped Spaces (video) Rodrigo Bombardi, Relationships Between Precipitation over Eastern South America and the South Atlantic Sea Surface Temperature (video) Skona Brittain, Where in the World is Hunter San Cazador? (video) Chuck Champlin, Twinkle: A Geometry of Meaning (video) Grant McKenzie, Airports: The Good, the Bad, and the WTF (video) Emily Ellis, Can we use terrestrial biogeography to inform placement of MPA’s? (video) Jon Jablonski, New in MIL: The Fairchild Aerial Surveys Collection (video) William Yim, Airfield Design and Capacity (video) Yingjie Hu, Citation Map: Visualizing the Spread of Scientific Ideas through Space and Time (video) Kitty Currier, Shipshaping and Fiafia (or How I Became a Geographer) (video) View all videos on YouTube:
2015 Lightning Talks playlist
View All Videos March 10, 2010 Organized by Alan Glennon, the brave cast of inspirational speakers presenting to a standing-room-only crowd included: Rick Church, Marine Transportation: OOPS (video) Helen Couclelis, Why Sketching Works (or, Why GIS Needs Design) (video) Kitty Currier, Beyond Street View: Documenting Coral Reefs with “Immersive” Video (video) Alan Glennon, How to Map a Cave (video) Rhonda Glennon, How to become a Private Pilot (video) Michael F. Goodchild, Spatio-temporal Constraints on Social Networks (video) Dan Montello, Baldknobbers of the Ozarks (video) Hugo Repolho, Optimum Location of Motorway Interchanges: Concessionaires’ Perspective (video) Waldo Tobler, Ravenstein Revisited (video) View all videos on YouTube:

Vertices Newsletter

Spatial@ucsb, The UCSB Center for Spatial Studies, is an innovative, university-wide resource and research center at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Its mission is to facilitate the integration of spatial thinking into processes for learning and discovery in the natural, social, and behavioral sciences, to promote excellence in engineering and applied sciences, and to enhance creativity in the arts and humanities. Spatial@ucsb is dedicated to promoting campus-wide, spatially related events, research, and teaching for all disciplines that share an interest in the importance of spatial thinking in science and in artistic endeavors, the development of spatial analytic tools, and the importance of place in society.

Please browse this website to discover the many resources this project has to offer. News and events related to Spatial@ucsb are published in its newsletter, Vertices:

Issue 9: New Initiatives

Annual Specialist Meeting A Evolves to Spatial Un-Conference
Spatial Discovery Project
Spatial Coffee Hour
New Personnel—Antonio Medrano

Issue 8: New Visions

New Visions—New Director
Spatially Enabled Smart Places
Transitions—Janelle Retires, Ballatore Replaces
Outreach—4H GIS Project

Issue 7: New Directions—New Co-Director

Is There Life after Spatial?
From spatial@ucsb to a Garden in Seattle
Visiting Scholars
Research Associates and Post-Docs
International Spatial Cognition Summer Institute
Freshman Seminar: Thinking Spatially in the Arts and Sciences
Minor in Spatial Studies

Issue 6: The End of An Era—And the Beginning of a New One

Michael Goodchild Retires
New Director of spatial@ucsb, Mary Hegarty
A note from the New Director
Minor in Spatial Studies
Spatial Technology Lunch Discussions
Freshman Seminar: Thinking Spatially in the Arts and Sciences
Caves and Cognition: Exploring the Cave Experience from Multidisciplinary Perspectives

Issue 5: LA-Plan: A Virtual Co-laboratory for Policy Analysis of the Greater Los Angeles Basin

The End of An Era?And the Beginning of a New One
Seek—Scale for Everyday Environmental Knowledge
The Beginningof a New Era—A New Academic Minor in Spatial Studies

Issue 4: Tools for Map Making

Geography on a Motorcycle: The Guinea worm in Niger
Goodchild—Accumulating Honors
Summer Workshops Past and Future

Issue 3: Introducing teachspatial.org.

Where in the World is Mike Goodchild?
Goodchild & Raubal Awarded NGA Grant
Summer Workshops Past and Future

Issue 2: A University Minor in Spatial Thinking?

Spatial Help Desk Consultations
Summer Workshops Spatial Pattern Analysis
Summer Workshops Geographic Information Systems for Behavioral Research
Geog 176A: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

Issue 1spatial@ucsb Inaugurated

Marking the 120th Meridian<

Classics in Spatial Thinking

The foundations of spatial analysis span many disciplines over many generations of researchers and practitioners. CSISS Classics provides summaries and illustrations of major contributions to spatial thinking in the social sciences. Primary emphasis is given to research before 1980, with an attempt to capture and acknowledge the repository of spatial thinking in the social sciences for the last few centuries. The summaries, along with key references, are intended as guides for those interested in exploring intellectual inheritance from previous generations.

CSISS Classics: available on eScholarship as part of our Spatial Archives.