Spatial Data Science Hangout Series: November 2019

T next seminar in the Center for Spatial Studies’ Spatial Data Hangouts series will be on Tuesday, 11/19 from 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m. at 3512 Phelps Hall. All grad students are invited to attend.

Continuing the theme of finding academic employment, where we discuss why and how to apply for a professorship, we will continue last month’s discussion of the academic hiring process and talk about interviews on-site and per teleconference. We will also do at least one test run to give you a chance to practice. Hence, if you would like to volunteer and be interviewed in front of the other students, please let Jano or Karen know.

We will be providing a light lunch after the discussion. Please contact Karen Doehner if you plan to attend.

 

Spatial Data Science Hangout Series: Fall 2019

Spatial Data Science Hangouts Poster

After a successful first run in the last academic year, the Center for Spatial Studies will again be hosting the Spatial Data Hangouts, with the first one on Thursday, 10/17 from 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m. at 3512 Phelps Hall. All grad students are invited to attend.

With the season for academic jobs starting, the next few spatial data science hangouts will be used to to discuss why and how to apply for a professorship, eg., how to write your cover letters, what makes a good recommendation letter, how to structure your CV, how to score during the on-site interviews and your talk, how to negotiate, and so on.

We will focus on jobs in spatial data science, GIScience, remote sensing, spatial cognition, and so on, but most of what we will discuss applies to academic employment in general. We will do all this in a hands-on, interactive style.

We will be providing a light lunch after the discussion. Please contact Karen Doehner if you plan to attend.

 

Spatial Center Receives NSF Grant

Center for Spatial Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara participating in NSF C-Accel Pilot

View the complete news release at: https://www.news.ucsb.edu/2019/019651/breaking-data-out-silos

The Center of Spatial Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara is receiving research funding under the Open Knowledge Network track of the new Convergence Accelerator Pilot (C-Accel) by the National Science Foundation (NSF). Prof. Krzysztof Janowicz leads a diverse team of partners from academia, industry, and federal agencies. The team will develop Artificial Intelligence based models, methods, and services for representing,  retrieving, linking, and predicting spatial and temporal data from a highly diverse set of public knowledge graphs that range across topics such as soil health and the historic slave trade. 

This new NSF Convergence Accelerator Pilot program is set to “bring teams together to focus on grand challenges of national importance that require a convergence approach […] and have a high probability of resulting in deliverables that will benefit society within a fixed term.” NSF is funding several teams under this program in an effort that will lead to the development of public knowledge graphs which in turn have “the potential to drive innovation across all areas of science and engineering, and unleash the power of data and artificial intelligence to achieve scientific discovery and economic growth.” The funding program is highly competitive and had an acceptance rate of only 8.5%.

2019 Spatial Data Science Symposium

Spatial Data Science Symposium

“Setting the Spatial Data Science Agenda”

December 9–11, 2019

Upham Hotel (https://www.uphamhotel.com/)

Santa Barbara, California

Visit the official SDSS site

Motivation

Space and time matter not only for the obvious reason that everything happens somewhere and at some time, but because knowing where and when things happen is critical to understanding why and how they happened or will happen. Spatial data science is concerned with the representation, modeling, and simulation of spatial processes, as well as with the publication, retrieval, reuse, integration, and analysis of spatial data. It generalizes and unifies research from fields such as geographic information science, geoinformatics, geo/spatial statistics, remote sensing, and transportation studies, and fosters the application of methods developed in these fields to outside disciplines ranging from the social to the physical sciences. In doing so, research on spatial data science must address a variety of new challenges that relate to the diversity of the utilized data and the underlying conceptual models from various domains, the opportunistic reuse of existing data, the scalability of its methods, the support of users not familiar with the language and methods of traditional geographic information systems, the reproducibility of its results that are often generated by complex chains of methods, the uncertainty arising from the use of its methods and data, the visualization of complex spatiotemporal processes and data about them, and, finally, the data collection, analysis, and visualization playing out in near real-time. Spatial data science does not only utilize advanced techniques from fields such as machine learning or big data storage and retrieval, but it also contributes back to them. Recent work, for instance, has shown that spatially-explicit machine learning methods substantially outperform more general data when applied to spatial data even though this spatial component may seem of secondary importance at first glance.

Goals

Instead of being restricted by a historically grown partition into small and overlapping communities that deal with spatial data in one way or the other, the overarching goal of this symposium is to put spatial data science at the forefront of a unified field that explores the current research and application landscape to define an agenda for spatial data science for the next 10 years.

Means

Forty-three experts from academia and industry convened to share and develop visions, insights, and best practices. Plenary presentations and intense exchanges in small breakout discussion groups offered opportunities for knowledge transfer.

2019 Spatial Data Science Symposium

Spatial Data Science Symposium

“Setting the Spatial Data Science Agenda”

December 9–11, 2019

 

Upham Hotel (https://www.uphamhotel.com/)

Santa Barbara, California

Motivation

Space and time matter not only for the obvious reason that everything happens somewhere and at some time, but because knowing where and when things happen is critical to understanding why and how they happened or will happen. Spatial data science is concerned with the representation, modeling, and simulation of spatial processes, as well as with the publication, retrieval, reuse, integration, and analysis of spatial data. It generalizes and unifies research from fields such as geographic information science, geoinformatics, geo/spatial statistics, remote sensing, and transportation studies, and fosters the application of methods developed in these fields to outside disciplines ranging from the social to the physical sciences. In doing so, research on spatial data science must  address a variety of new challenges that relate to the diversity of the utilized data and the underlying conceptual models from various domains, the opportunistic reuse of existing data, the scalability of its methods, the support of users not familiar with the language and methods of traditional geographic information systems, the reproducibility of its results that are often generated by complex chains of methods, the uncertainty arising from the use of its methods and data, the visualization of complex spatiotemporal processes and data about them, and, finally, the data collection, analysis, and visualization playing out in near real-time. Spatial data science does not only utilize advanced techniques from fields such as machine learning or big data storage and retrieval, but it also contributes back to them. Recent work, for instance, has shown that spatially-explicit machine learning methods substantially outperform more general data when applied to spatial data even though this spatial component may seem of secondary importance at first glance.

Co-sponsored by Esri, the Center for Spatial Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara is hosting a symposium entitled “Setting the Spatial Data Science Agenda.” The meeting will bring together academic and industry representatives from fields such as geographic information science, geoinformatics, geo/spatial statistics, remote sensing, and transportation studies, with interest in setting an interdisciplinary research agenda to advance spatial data science methods and practice, both from scientific and engineering viewpoints. We also invite experts from related fields and those that are producers or users of spatial data in the social and physical sciences.

Goals

Instead of being restricted by a historically grown partition into small and overlapping communities that deal with spatial data in one way or the other, the overarching goal of this symposium is to put spatial data science at the forefront of a unified field that explores the current research and application landscape to define an agenda for spatial data science for the next 10 years.

Means 

About 35 invited and funded experts from academia and industry will convene to share and develop visions, insights, and best practices. Plenary presentations and intense exchanges in small breakout discussion groups offer opportunities for knowledge transfer.

Call for Applications 

To apply, please submit a one-page, paragraph-style bio with a photograph and a short two-page position paper (in PDF format), discussing your perspective on the subject by August 23, 2019. Participants will be selected by the organizing committee and notified of their acceptance by September 9. Our goal is to achieve a balance of participants from a variety of disciplines and from different career levels. Hence, we especially encourage early-career (including graduate students) participants from both the industry and academia to apply. We will cover the full expense of accommodations and reimburse travel expenses up to $1,200 for international participants and $700 for domestic. 

The meeting will be held at the Upham Hotel in downtown Santa Barbara on Dec. 9–11; suggested travel days are Dec. 8 and the afternoon of Dec. 11.

Please see http://spatial.ucsb.edu for more information. 

Submit your application directly to Karen Doehner <kdoehner@spatial.ucsb.edu>.

Please feel free to contact Krzysztof Janowicz <janowicz@ucsb.edu> if you have questions about the event or the call for applications.

Hosted Conferences

Conferences hosted by the UCSB Center for Spatial Studies.

International Conference on the Internet of Things
IoT 2018

The 8th International Conference on the Internet of Things (IoT 2018) hosted by the Center for Spatial Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara was held October 15–18, 2018 in Santa Barbara, California. Read more.

Thank you to Spatial Lightning Talk 2018 presenters

The UCSB Center for Spatial Studies hosted another great round of Spatial Lightning Talks this year, with a whole new batch of spatially-relevant topics. Eight speakers took the challenge to “enlighten us, but make it quick!”

Many new and returning faces in the crowd had the opportunity to hear a lively group of speakers and make new connections across campus. This year, there was a 2-minute question and answer period after each 3-minute presentation, allowing the audience to participate more in the program.

Spatial Lightning Talks 2018

Two speakers, Paul Wilson (formerly of GE / MapFrame) and James Caesar (UCSB Campus Emergency Manager) spoke about the recent Thomas Fire and mudslides. Paul called for map-minded people in the local community to band together and improve the state of emergency mapping; James shared some of his real, on-the-ground experience responding to the recent fire and mudslide events.

Geography Professor Keith Clarke taught us about a local piece of history just around the bend at Honda Point. Thomas Crimmel continued the geographers and history theme with his (very!) abridged history of the digital desktop.

Joshua Kuntzman, graduate student at the Gervitz School of Education, pushed us to think more about what it takes to facilitate true interdisciplinary work through the UCSB Crossroads program. Jeremy Douglass, Assistant Professor of English, gave us a run-through of his project Panelcode.

Spatial Lightning Talks 2018

Graduate student Lily Cheng made everyone stop and think about their well-developed
‘paw preferences’, and aviation consultant William Yim gave everyone a new perspective on focus in photography.

This event was organized by Crystal Bae, bidding adieu to Kitty Currier who has done a great job organizing in years past. If you are interested in presenting a 3-minute lightning talk at next year’s event, get in touch with Crystal anytime. Videos of this year’s talks will be posted on the Spatial Center website once they become available.

Spatial Lightning Talks 2018

spatial@ucsb welcomes Pyry Kettunen

Pyry KettunenPyry Kettunen is visiting the Center for Spatial Studies as a Fulbright Junior Scholar Feb–Jul 2018 for a research project on collaborative geospatial thinking. He is a Senior Research Scientist in the Department of Geoinformatics and Cartography at the Finnish Geospatial Research Institute (FGI) that is part of the National Land Survey of Finland (NLS-FI). He received his M.Sc. (Tech.) in Geoinformatics from Helsinki University of Technology in 2008 and D.Sc. (Tech.) in Geoinformatics from Aalto University School of Engineering in 2014. His studies included an exchange year at the EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland, and four months as a visiting grant researcher at the LMC lab of the Université Paris Descartes.

Kettunen’s research has concentrated on human spatial cognition of landmarks and wayfinding as well as on development and usability of varied kinds of cartographic applications. His current research interests include interpersonal spatial cognition, cartographic animation, and web maps. His personal interests are in endurance sports in nature, choir or group singing when possible, and arts in general.

Minor in Spatial Studies

moons-thumb

Course requirements Complete Course Listing

View Minor flyer

Please note: Geography majors are now eligible for the Minor in Spatial Studies.

The Center for Spatial Studies is pleased to cooperate with the Department of Geography and the College of Letters and Science to provide advisory support for students seeking to complement their disciplinary majors with a Minor in Spatial Studies. Spatial Studies is framed as an interdisciplinary minor that recognizes the many disciplinary origins of innovations in spatial reasoning, representation, and analysis. All advising is now done through the Department of Geography.

General information or document submission: General advising, until further notice: ally@geog.ucsb.edu; Academic advising, until further notice:  Werner Kuhn.

With upper-division courses from more than two-dozen disciplines listed for the minor, students can tap into a creative mix of ideas and tools to enhance their majors and career orientations with spatial perspectives. For the Minor in Spatial Studies, a student selects one of three focus areas that allies most clearly with his/her areas of disciplinary and/or career interest. These include: (a) Spatial Thinking, (b) Space and Place, and (c) Spatial Science. The curricula for these areas of study include a breadth of courses that reflect the pervasive nature of spatial reasoning across diverse fields of knowledge.

Focus in Spatial Thinking

The Spatial Thinking focus emphasizes spatial cognition and reasoning associated with problem solving and representation, and applications of both elementary and complex reasoning processes in different domains of human activity and knowledge development. This focus represents a concentration on the science of spatial learning at individual and societal levels, and on the mental associations that facilitate learning about and functioning within human and natural environments.

Focus in Spatial Science

The Spatial Science focus emphasizes the analysis and visualization of information, featuring courses that build methodological and technological competencies for documenting space-time patterns and processes about phenomena in the physical world as well as about behavior and its consequences in the human world. In the design disciplines (including some branches of engineering) the focus is on problem solving and product development that frequently entails the (re)arrangement of spatial entities and documentation of the consequences thereafter.

Focus in Space and Place

The Space and Place focus builds on courses that apply spatial reasoning and visualization in the humanities. Examples include creative and aesthetic renderings (e.g., stories, visualizations, sounds, and fine arts), the design of lived-in environments that reflect and accommodate human values and activities, the documentation and assessment of affinity to sense of place and region, and communication through use of spatial metaphor and spatialized languages.

Geography W12 (Maps and Spatial Reasoning), the required common course for the minor, treats the fundamental science of mapping, including the underlying mathematics for spatial transformations and projections, exposure to computerized graphics and mapping systems, and the use of maps as research tools to document and communicate information as well as to solve problems. The widespread and increasing use of online and handheld mapping technologies over the past decade has embedded the map into expressions of spatial and geographical metaphor, spatiality, and place identity that render geo-spatial literacy as an appropriate foundation for informed citizenship and problem solving in many disciplines and careers. Geog. W12 is taught online and holds a weekly lab.

How to Become a Minor in Spatial Studies

Have you completed the Minor? Please evaluate our program in our Survey Questionnaire

Although students do not need to declare the minor, students interested in the interdisciplinary Minor in Spatial Studies may seek consultation in the Department of Geography (Ellison 1837). The advisor’s office hours are Thursdays, 1:00 to 2:30 p.m., but appointments may be made by email: allysanfoot@ucsb.edu. Since campus is closed until January 2021, all advising will be done remotely.

Students who meet course requirements may request certification to graduate with a Minor in Spatial Studies by completing the Course Requirements for Minor in Spatial Studies before meeting with an advisor in the Center for Spatial Studies.

Once a student has completed the required courses, he or she can deliver the completed Course Requirements Form for review and approval by the advisor in the Department of Geography at 1837 Ellison. Once approved, the academic advisor will sign a Clearance Form for the Minor in Spatial Studies and deliver it to the registrar.

Minor Regulations

The following conditions must be met for official recognition of the minor:

  • Students must consult the General Catalog for prerequisites to all listed courses.
  • All courses to be applied to the minor must be completed on a letter-grade basis. This includes all courses that are applied to the minor, offered by the Department of Geography as well as those offered by other departments.
  • No more than 3 upper-division courses can be taken from a single department
  • At least 20 upper-division quarter units are completed for the minor. Waivers cannot reduce the requirement below this number.
  • Substitutions and waivers are subject to approval by the advisor for the Spatial Studies Minor.
  • The UC grade-point average in ALL applicable upper-division courses, including those in excess of minimum requirements, is 2.0 or higher.
  • No more than 5 upper-division units overlap between the Spatial Studies Minor and the upper-division portion of a student’s major(s) or other minor(s). If the overlap with a student’s major(s) exceeds 5 upper-division units, then completion of the Spatial Studies Minor will not be formally recognized; if the overlap with other minor(s) exceeds 5 upper-division units, then only the first minor reported will be noted on the student’s transcript.
  • Students must have completed at least 12 of the upper-division requirements for the minor while registered as a UCSB student.
  • Once a student has completed the course work outlined above, he or she can pick up, complete, and submit a Course Requirements for Minor in Spatial Studies checklist at the Geography Department (1837 Ellison).
  • The sponsoring department reports completion of the minor prior to the posting of the degree.