spatial@ucsb.local2019: Posters

spatial@ucsb.local2019 main page The Future of Island Oaks The Future of Island Oaks Laura Wolf, Sofie McComb, Claire Powers, Jazmine Uy, Alyssa Winchell Bren School of Environmental Management, University of California, Santa Barbara Description: Island oak (Quercus tomentella) is a rare oak species endemic to six islands in the California Island Archipelago (CAIA). Over a century of farming and grazing on the islands degraded core habitat and reduced island oak seedling recruitment. The species was listed as endangered by the IUCN in 2016. Most historical threats have been removed, though island oak regeneration is still restricted and there is concern that impending climate change poses an additional threat that may ultimately lead to extinction. Spatially-constrained, if the island oak’s range shifts or further deteriorates, alternative options are limited. We used MaxEnt, a species distribution model, to identify island oak’s bioclimatic niche on Santa Cruz, Santa Rosa, and Santa Catalina Islands and then predicted where that niche might exist through the end of the century under four climate change scenarios. Model outputs supported three main findings: (1) Island oak’s predicted bioclimatic niche was largely driven by soil moisture availability; (2) Santa Rosa Island had the most predicted suitable habitat under each climate change scenario, while predicted suitable habitat on Santa Cruz and Santa Catalina Islands was minimal; and (3) the bioclimatic habitat occupied by island oak varies substantially between the three islands studied. Improvements in life history information, legacy grazing patterns, and more finely downscaled climate data would substantially increase model validity. Research should focus on identifying mechanisms driving the variation in habitat occupied on each island, while restoration should prioritize habitat augmentation and seedling recruitment, to increase island oak’s resiliency to climate change.   Urbanization and its Effects on the Surrounding Environment                       Urbanization and its Effects on the Surrounding Environment: Case Study of Beijing and Lanzhou, China Guiyu Li, Yingyi He, Jiaxuan Lyu, Hoayu Shi Department of Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara Description: In the past decades, China has experienced massive economic growth and urban development. Changes in urban land cover, vegetation healthiness, and temperature distribution are crucial factors to understand the urbanization effects on the surrounding environment. Beijing and Lanzhou, two distinctive cities in terms of size and geographical location, are selected as our study objects. Using Landsat 5 and 8 images from 1993 to 2017 for the two cities, we train our algorithms to classify land cover types, including urban, vegetation, soil, and water. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) is calculated to measure vegetation health. Temperatures are derived using the radiance of the thermal band. Land cover classes are used for NDVI and temperature analysis. Based...

Call for Visitors

Dec 5, 2018 • Categories: Featured | Highlight | News | Research | Visitors

Welcoming New Applications! The UCSB Center for Spatial Studies invites interested scholars, instructors, postdoctoral researchers, and interns to apply to become a visitor with the Spatial Center. Details are available through this...

Hosted Conferences

Conferences hosted by the UCSB Center for Spatial Studies. International Conference on the Internet of Things The 8th International Conference on the Internet of Things (IoT 2018) hosted by the Center for Spatial Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara was held October 15–18, 2018 in Santa Barbara, California. Read...

Thank you to Spatial Lightning Talk 2018 presenters

Feb 13, 2018 • Categories: Event | Featured | Highlight | Lightning Talks | News | Photos

The UCSB Center for Spatial Studies hosted another great round of Spatial Lightning Talks this year, with a whole new batch of spatially-relevant topics. Eight speakers took the challenge to “enlighten us, but make it quick!” Many new and returning faces in the crowd had the opportunity to hear a lively group of speakers and make new connections across campus. This year, there was a 2-minute question and answer period after each 3-minute presentation, allowing the audience to participate more in the program. Two speakers, Paul Wilson (formerly of GE / MapFrame) and James Caesar (UCSB Campus Emergency Manager) spoke about the recent Thomas Fire and mudslides. Paul called for map-minded people in the local community to band together and improve the state of emergency mapping; James shared some of his real, on-the-ground experience responding to the recent fire and mudslide events. Geography Professor Keith Clarke taught us about a local piece of history just around the bend at Honda Point. Thomas Crimmel continued the geographers and history theme with his (very!) abridged history of the digital desktop. Joshua Kuntzman, graduate student at the Gervitz School of Education, pushed us to think more about what it takes to facilitate true interdisciplinary work through the UCSB Crossroads program. Jeremy Douglass, Assistant Professor of English, gave us a run-through of his project Panelcode. Graduate student Lily Cheng made everyone stop and think about their well-developed ‘paw preferences’, and aviation consultant William Yim gave everyone a new perspective on focus in photography. This event was organized by Crystal Bae, bidding adieu to Kitty Currier who has done a great job organizing in years past. If you are interested in presenting a 3-minute lightning talk at next year’s event, get in touch with Crystal anytime. Videos of this year’s talks will be posted on the Spatial Center website once they become...

spatial@ucsb welcomes Pyry Kettunen

Feb 9, 2018 • Categories: Highlight | News | Visitors

Pyry Kettunen is visiting the Center for Spatial Studies as a Fulbright Junior Scholar Feb–Jul 2018 for a research project on collaborative geospatial thinking. He is a Senior Research Scientist in the Department of Geoinformatics and Cartography at the Finnish Geospatial Research Institute (FGI) that is part of the National Land Survey of Finland (NLS-FI). He received his M.Sc. (Tech.) in Geoinformatics from Helsinki University of Technology in 2008 and D.Sc. (Tech.) in Geoinformatics from Aalto University School of Engineering in 2014. His studies included an exchange year at the EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland, and four months as a visiting grant researcher at the LMC lab of the Université Paris Descartes. Kettunen’s research has concentrated on human spatial cognition of landmarks and wayfinding as well as on development and usability of varied kinds of cartographic applications. His current research interests include interpersonal spatial cognition, cartographic animation, and web maps. His personal interests are in endurance sports in nature, choir or group singing when possible, and arts in...

Minor in Spatial Studies

Course requirements Complete Course Listing Fall 2018 Course Listings View Minor flyer Please note: Geography majors are now eligible for the Minor in Spatial Studies. The Center for Spatial Studies is pleased to cooperate with the Department of Geography and the College of Letters and Science to provide advisory support for students seeking to complement their disciplinary majors with a Minor in Spatial Studies. Spatial Studies is framed as an interdisciplinary minor that recognizes the many disciplinary origins of innovations in spatial reasoning, representation, and analysis. All advising is now done through the Department of Geography. General information or document submission: General advising, 1834 Ellison Hall; Academic advising: during fall quarter, 3512 Phelps Hall on Wednesdays at 1 p.m. or by appointment: Werner Kuhn. With upper-division courses from more than two-dozen disciplines listed for the minor, students can tap into a creative mix of ideas and tools to enhance their majors and career orientations with spatial perspectives. For the Minor in Spatial Studies, a student selects one of three focus areas that allies most clearly with his/her areas of disciplinary and/or career interest. These include: (a) Spatial Thinking, (b) Space and Place, and (c) Spatial Science. The curricula for these areas of study include a breadth of courses that reflect the pervasive nature of spatial reasoning across diverse fields of knowledge. Focus in Spatial Thinking The Spatial Thinking focus emphasizes spatial cognition and reasoning associated with problem solving and representation, and applications of both elementary and complex reasoning processes in different domains of human activity and knowledge development. This focus represents a concentration on the science of spatial learning at individual and societal levels, and on the mental associations that facilitate learning about and functioning within human and natural environments. Focus in Spatial Science The Spatial Science focus emphasizes the analysis and visualization of information, featuring courses that build methodological and technological competencies for documenting space-time patterns and processes about phenomena in the physical world as well as about behavior and its consequences in the human world. In the design disciplines (including some branches of engineering) the focus is on problem solving and product development that frequently entails the (re)arrangement of spatial entities and documentation of the consequences thereafter. Focus in Space and Place The Space and Place focus builds on courses that apply spatial reasoning and visualization in the humanities. Examples include creative and aesthetic renderings (e.g., stories, visualizations, sounds, and fine arts), the design of lived-in environments that reflect and accommodate human values and activities, the documentation and assessment of affinity to sense of place and region, and communication through use of spatial metaphor and spatialized languages. Geography W12 (Maps and Spatial Reasoning), the required common course for the minor, treats the...