spatial@ucsb.local17: Poster and Plenary Session

May 15, 2017 • Categories: Event | Featured | News | spatial@ucsb.local

spatial@ucsb.local2017 Environmental Conflict Resolution in the Santa Barbara Channel Thursday, June 8, 2017 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Corwin Pavilion Invitation & AgendaSpeakersPosters The annual spatial@ucsb.local17 Poster and Plenary Session that showcases how spatial thinking facilitates research and creativity was held on Thursday, June 8, 2017 at Corwin Pavilion. With Rockney Rudolph presiding, the Channel Islands Regional GIS Collaborative (CIRGIS) held its annual meeting; Grace Goldberg moderated the Plenary Session on Environmental Conflict Resolution in the Santa Barbara Channel, and 38 posters were submitted for viewing and discussion after the meeting. Representatives from the private sector and industry and campus-wide academics in the humanities, sciences, social sciences, and engineering programs participated in this event. Photo credit: George Naugles Presenter: Carrie Kappel Presenter: Morgan Visalli Speakers Carrie Kappel, Ph.D. Associate Research Scientist, National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS), University of California, Santa Barbara Planning for Aquaculture in the Southern California Bight, with Models, Maps, and Real Stakeholders Marine spatial planning (MSP) is increasingly used to reduce conflicts and environmental impacts and promote sustainable use of marine ecosystems. We developed a modeling framework to coordinate the development of multiple emerging ocean uses while balancing multiple existing management objectives. In this talk I will demonstrate its value for guiding offshore aquaculture (bivalve, finfish and kelp farming) development in relation to existing sectors and environmental concerns (wild-capture fisheries, view shed quality, benthic pollution and disease spread) in the Southern California Bight. We identified >250,000 MSP solutions that show that aquaculture can be highly compatible with other ocean uses while generating significant seafood supply and billions of dollars in revenue with minimal impacts. To illustrate, I’ll discuss how these results are being used to inform offshore shellfish aquaculture planning, and stakeholder engagement in Ventura, CA. Bio: Carrie Kappel is an Associate Research Scientist at University of California’s National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis. She earned a B.S. with Honors in Biology from Brown University and a Ph.D. in Biology from Stanford University. A marine conservation biologist and community ecologist by training, she has worked in coral reefs, kelp forests and rocky intertidal systems and now uses collaborative synthesis science to develop conservation solutions that protect marine ecosystems and enhance human well-being. Morgan Visalli MESM, Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Whales, Ships, and Missiles in the Santa Barbara Channel: Solving Complex Environmental Problems with Innovative Spatial Tools The Santa Barbara Channel region has an exceptional abundance and diversity of marine species, and provides important habitat for Gray, Blue and Humpback whales. The area is also heavily transited by large cargo ships and serves as a military testing ground. These dynamics have resulted in fatal ship strikes on endangered whales and conflicts among ocean users. This talk will explore...

spatial@local17: Now accepting poster submissions

Mar 27, 2017 • Categories: Event | Featured | spatial@ucsb.local

Call for posters for spatial@local2017! Submissions will be accepted until May 15, 2017 (note new deadline) and should be sent to kdoehner@spatial.ucsb.edu. View event flyer and event information page. spatial@local17 Date: June 8, 2017 Location: Corwin Pavilion Time: 10:00 am – 2:00 pm Plenary Session Topic: Environmental Conflict Resolution in the Santa Barbara Channel The ocean is crowded with human activities including shipping, fishing, aquaculture, recreation, energy extraction and more. The Santa Barbara Channel is a prime example of how many of these activities conflict spatially and, together, stress marine ecosystems and threaten the services they provide. How do we know where ocean uses are conflicting? How can we engage ocean stakeholders in a participatory process to reduce conflict? What is the role of science and GIS in the resolution of environmental conflict? Our presenters will highlight some recent efforts to involve a wide array of stakeholders, scientists and government agencies in the design of plans that reduce conflict in the Santa Barbara Channel and improve the sustainable use of our ocean resources. Speakers:  Morgan Visalli, California Sea Grant Fellow (2015), Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary http://channelislands.noaa.gov/contact/visalli.html Dr. Carrie Kappel, Associate Project Scientist, NCEAS, UCSB https://www.nceas.ucsb.edu/seniorfellows#kappel Moderator: Grace Goldberg, Director of Operations, SeaSketch & McClintock Lab, UCSB...

ThinkSpatial: Susan Cassels

Mar 27, 2017 • Categories: Event | Featured | ThinkSpatial

On Tuesday, April 11, 2017 The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents “Short-term Mobility and Sexual Behavior – Testing the Selection, Enabling, and Influence Hypotheses” Susan Cassels Department of Geography University of California, Santa Barbara 12:00 p.m. Tuesday, April 11, 2017 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map) | (View Flyer) Abstract: Short-term mobility is often associated with increased risk behavior. For example, mobile individuals often have higher rates of sexual risk behavior compared to non-mobile individuals, but the reasons why are not clear. Using monthly retrospective panel data from Ghana, we test whether short-term mobility is associated with differences in total and unprotected sex acts, and whether the association is due to enabling, selection, or influential reasons. Men who were mobile in a given month had more sex acts compared to non-mobile men. Regardless of short-term mobility in a given month, both men and women who were mobile in future months had more sex acts compared to individuals not mobile in future months. Our findings support the hypothesis that both men and women who are mobile are positively selected on sexual risk behavior. The enabling hypothesis, that the act of being mobile enables sexual risk behavior, was only supported for men. Bio: Susan Cassels, PhD, MPH is an assistant professor of Geography and a research associate in the Broom Center for Demography at the University of California Santa Barbara. Her work spans many disciplines, including demography, epidemiology, and geography. Cassels’ research interests are in the areas of population health, migration, epidemic modeling, HIV/AIDS, and sexual networks. Currently, her research is focused on migration and residential mobility and its effects on sexual risk behavior, sexual network structure and HIV transmission. She has ongoing projects among heterosexuals in Ghana and among men who have sex with men in Seattle and Los Angeles. — The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts. Please contact Kitty Currier (kcurrier@spatial.ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking. Follow spatial@ucsb on Facebook | Twitter | Google+ | Google...