ThinkSpatial: Amr El Abbadi

On Tuesday, November 14, 2017 The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents “LocBorg: Location Privacy while Preserving Online Persona” Amr El Abbadi Department of Computer Science University of California, Santa Barbara 12:00 p.m. Tuesday, November 14, 2017 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map) Flyer Abstract: Social media stream analysis can reveal the characteristics of users who engage with or post about different topics. Recent technologies show that it is possible to reveal sensitive attributes (e.g., location, gender, ethnicity, political views, etc.) of individuals by analyzing their social media streams. Although, the prediction of a user’s attributes can be used to enhance the user experience in social media, revealing some sensitive attributes like location could represent a threat to individuals. In this talk will explore our vision regarding the future of user privacy on social media. We advocate a cyborg, an artificial intelligent system, which helps social media users protect their privacy by obfuscating their location while maintaining their online persona. Bio: Amr El Abbadi is a Professor of Computer Science at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He received his B. Eng. from Alexandria University, Egypt, and his Ph.D. from Cornell University. El Abbadi is an ACM Fellow, AAAS Fellow, and IEEE Fellow. He was Chair of the Computer Science Department at UCSB from 2007 to 2011. He has served as a journal editor for several database journals, including, The VLDB Journal, IEEE Transactions on Computers, and The Computer Journal. He has been Program Chair for multiple database and distributed systems conferences, most recently SIGSPATIAL GIS 2010, ACM Symposium on Cloud Computing (SoCC) 2011, COMAD (India) 2012, the first ACM Conference on Social Networks (COSN)2013 and The International Conference on Networked Systems (NETYS) in Morocco 2017. He currently serves on the executive committee of the IEEE Technical Committee on Data Engineering (TCDE) and was a board member of the VLDB Endowment from 2002 to 2008. In 2007, El Abbadi received the UCSB Senate Outstanding Mentorship Award for his excellence in mentoring graduate students. In 2013, his student, Sudipto Das received the SIGMOD Jim Gray Doctoral Dissertation Award. Most recently El Abbadi was the co‐recipient of the Test of Time Award at EDBT/ICDT 2015. He has published more than 300 articles in databases and distributed systems and has supervised more than 35 Ph.D. students. — The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts. Please contact Werner Kuhn (kuhn@ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking. Follow spatial@ucsb on Facebook...

ThinkSpatial: Clodoveu Davis

On Tuesday, October 31, 2017 The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents “Spatial Integrity Constraints from Conceptual Modeling and their support in Spatially-extended DBMSs” Clodoveu Davis Computer Science Department Universidade Federal de Minas Gervais 12:00 p.m. Tuesday, October 31, 2017 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map) Flyer Abstract: Relational database management systems (DBMS) typically offer, through SQL, functions and statements dedicated to establishing and enforcing integrity constraints for conventional data. Spatial extensions for RDBMSs add simple geometric data types, spatial reference systems, and spatial functions, but they have not advanced in the direction of a general specification of spatial integrity constraints. Further, there is a large semantic distance between abstract representation alternatives used in conceptual modeling for spatial databases, as opposed to the much simpler point/line/polygon definitions included in spatially‐extended RDMBSs. This distance has to be covered by application code, or by using general‐purpose (and frowned upon) mechanisms such as triggers. An argument will be presented toward (1) including more advanced spatial data types in spatial databases, and (2) the need for future expansion of data and indexing structures for spatial DBMSs to support the enforcement of spatial integrity constraints by the DBMS, to the benefit of superjacent applications, with greater efficiency. Bio: Clodoveu Davis is an associate professor at the Computer Science Department of Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. He lectures in graduate and undergraduate courses, and coordinates the Information Systems major at UFMG. In 2015 he created the Interdisciplinary Computer Science Lab (dubbed LabCS+x, where x stands for any other area of knowledge), which he continues to coordinate. He is also the program chair of GeoInfo, the main Brazilian conference on geoinformatics. His primary research interests are: spatial databases, spatial data infrastructures, geographic information systems (GIS), geographic data modeling, geocoding and urban GIS applications. — The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts. Please contact Werner Kuhn (kuhn@ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking. Follow spatial@ucsb on Facebook | Twitter | Google+ | Google...

Thinkspatial: Matto Mildenberger

Oct 10, 2017 • Categories: Core | Event | ThinkSpatial

On Tuesday, October 10, 2017 The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents The Spatial Distribution of U.S. Climate and Energy Beliefs Matto Mildenberger Department of Political Science University of California, Santa Barbara 12:00 p.m. Tuesday, October 10, 2017 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map) Abstract: Addressing climate change in the United States requires enactment of national, state, and local mitigation and adaptation policies. The success of these initiatives depends on public opinion, policy support and behaviors at appropriate scales. Public opinion, however, is typically measured with national surveys that obscure geographic variability across regions, states and localities. Matto Mildenberger will present validated, high-resolution opinion estimates of public opinion using a multilevel regression and post-stratification model. The model accurately predicts climate change beliefs, risk perceptions, and policy preferences at the state, congressional district, metropolitan, and county levels, using a concise set of demographic and geographic predictors. Mildenberger will also share research extensions to map the spatial distribution of Republican and Democrat partisan opinions, and to model the spatially-resolved responsiveness of U.S. communities to messaging experiments. — The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts. Please contact Karen Dohner (kdoehner@spatial.ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking. Follow spatial@ucsb on Facebook | Twitter | Google+ | Google...

Brownbags 2016-2017

The UCSB Brownbag Forum on Spatial Thinking   Informal noon-time presentations that feature theories, concepts, tools, and applications for spatial thinking across disciplines, including the natural and the social sciences, as well as the humanities. Presentations will take place at the Center for Spatial Studies, Phelps 3512, 12:00–1:00 pm. Schedule 2016–2017 DateSpeaker/Topic June 6, 2017Werner Kuhn Center for Spatial Studies and Department of Geography University of California, Santa Barbara Place-based GIS: What’s the big deal? May 30, 2017Kelly Caylor Earth Research Institute; Bren School of Environmental Science and Management; and Department of Geography University of California, Santa Barbara Dryland Feedbacks between Biogeochemistry, Plants and Surface Hydrological Dynamics May 2, 2017Dennis Whelan Campus Planning and Design University of California, Santa Barbara A Brief But Spectacular History of UCSB Campus Planing April 11, 2017Susan Cassels Department of Geography University of California, Santa Barbara Short-term Mobility and Sexual Behavior – Testing the Selection, Enabling, and Influence Hypotheses March 14, 2017Werner Kuhn, Nick Eidler and Marc Thiemann University of California, Santa Barbara The New UCSB Interactive Campus Map February 14, 2017Liz Chrastil Department of Geography University of California, Santa Barbara Navigation: Spatial Knowledge, Individual Differences, and Neuroscience November 29, 2016Andre Bruggmann University of Zurich How Does GIScience Support Spatio-Temporal and Thematic Information Exploration in the Humanities? November 8, 2016Tomi Kauppinen Aalto University Helsinski, Finland On Spatial Aboutness November 1, 2016Ben Halpern NCEAS University of California, Santa Barbara Mapping Global Hotspots of Ocean Aquaculture October 25, 2016Johanes Sholz TU, Graz Ontology and Epistemology of Indoor Manufacturing Environments October 18, 2016Katja Seltmann Cheadle Center for Biodiversity and Ecological Restoration University of California, Santa Barbara The Informative Bug: A Case Study Defining Areas of Endemism using North American Insects October 11, 2016Jeffrey Hoelle Assistant Professor Department of Anthropology University of California, Santa Barbara Forest, Weeds, and Hair: Conceptual Categories of Nature and the Management of "Covers" in...

ThinkSpatial: Werner Kuhn

Jun 1, 2017 • Categories: Event | ThinkSpatial

On Tuesday, June 6, 2017 The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents Place-based GIS: What’s the big deal? Werner Kuhn Center for Spatial Studies Department of Geography University of California, Santa Barbara 12:00 p.m. Tuesday, June 6, 2017 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map) Abstract: Modeling “place” remains a conundrum for spatial computing. Geographic Information Science has discussed requirements and possible approaches for many years, but has not yet produced a convincing solution. In this brief talk, I will present my recent work, together with colleagues at Melbourne University, that sheds new light on the topic. We took the current state of my Core Concepts of Spatial Information (Location, Field, Object, Network, Event) and asked what the simplest possible account for place would be in them that still satisfies the known requirements. The proposed solution (places are a special kind of objects) is now being tested against the requirements stated in the literature. Your feedback and questions will help in this process. Bio: Werner Kuhn holds the Jack and Laura Dangermond Endowed Chair in Geography at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where he is professor of Geographic Information Science. He is also the director of the Center for Spatial Studies at UCSB. His main research and teaching goal is to make spatial information and computing accessible across domains and disciplines. Before joining UCSB in late 2013, Kuhn was a professor of Geoinformatics at the University of Munster, Germany, where he led MUSIL, an interdisciplinary semantic interoperability research lab. Kuhn is described as a leading expert in the area of geospatial semantics and especially known for his work on Semantic Reference Systems as well as his work on interaction metaphors for Geographic Information Systems. Recent research projects include the Linked Open Data University of Muenster (together with the university library), and a series of EU projects on geospatial services in the semantic web. — The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts. Please contact Kitty Currier (kcurrier@spatial.ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking. Follow spatial@ucsb on Facebook | Twitter | Google+ | Google...

ThinkSpatial: Kelly Caylor

May 23, 2017 • Categories: Event | Featured | ThinkSpatial

On Tuesday, May 30, 2017 The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents “Dryland Feedbacks between Biogeochemistry, Plants and Surface Hydrological Dynamics” Kelly Caylor Professor, Department of Geography and the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management Director, Earth Research Institute University of California, Santa Barbara 12:00 p.m. Tuesday, May 30, 2017 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map) Abstract: Both the ecology and hydrology of dryland landscapes are characterized by high degrees of spatial and temporal heterogeneity. In particular, temporal heterogeneity in rainfall drives coupled hydrological and biogeochemical surface dynamics that are themselves highly influenced by the spatial organization of dryland vegetation. Despite being appreciated as a conceptual tool for understanding dryland function, the specific role of temporal and spatial variability in governing the dynamics of drylands has received little empirical attention. Most studies of variability in rainfall and soil moisture dynamics have attempted to capture either fine-scale spatial heterogeneity caused by vegetation structure (i.e. tree/grass/bare patch differences) or short-term impacts of shifts in soil moisture distributions via experimental manipulations. In this talk, I will examine the larger-scale implications of rainfall variability, impacts of variability on the partitioning of surface hydrological fluxes, and subsequent patterns and dynamics of vegetation and biogeochemistry across a range of ecological settings. Of particular interest is understanding how dryland, moist tropical, and subsistence agricultural ecosystems will respond to shifts in rainfall climatology which may alter the frequency and depth of rainfall events without necessarily impacting average seasonal rainfall totals. Using examples from across the tropics – with a focus on sub-Sarahan Africa – I will highlight some recent work which explores shifts in ecosystem function driven by altered rainfall climatology and the potential impacts of increased variability on the structure and function of African ecosystems. Bio: Professor Caylor is the Director of the Earth Research Institute and Professor of Ecohydrology in the Department of Geography and the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at UCSB. He received his PhD in Environmental Sciences from the University of Virginia. Professor Caylor’s research seeks to develop improved insight into the way that land use and climate change are interacting to affect the dynamics and resilience of global drylands. His primary research sites are in sub-Saharan Africa, where he is focused on understanding the vulnerability of pastoral and subsistence agricultural communities to current and future changes in hydrological dynamics. His teaching experience and interests include field courses in Kenya, earth system sciences, environmental biophysics, and environmental sensing and sensor development. He is a co-founder of Arable Labs, Inc. (www.arable.com), a company focused on enhancing agricultural decision making and improving in-field data availability for farmers. Professor Caylor conducts research at a number of spatial and temporal scales; from small-scale experiments...