ThinkSpatial: Claudio Fogu

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On Tuesday, March 10 June 9, 2020, The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents

The Fishing Net and the Spider Web—

Making Italians Making Southerners

 

Claudio Fogu

Department of French and Italian
University of California, Santa Barbara

12:00 p.m. Tuesday, March 10 June 9, 2020 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map)

 

Abstract:

This talk will discuss the network-theory approach of Grad Malkin’s study of the Archaic Mediterranean and its extension to the history of the modern Mediterranean. Fogu will focus in particular on the role played by the Italian peninsula, coastal communities, and islands in the oscillation among distributed, centralized, and decentralized patterns of connectivity in the Mediterranean.

Bio:

Claudio Fogu moved to Los Angeles in 1983 to study film at UCLA, and later pursued a Ph.D. in History. He taught at Ohio State University and then at USC. Since moving to UCSB in 2005 he has been an Associate Professor of Italian Studies and teaches courses on Italian cultural history and memory, with an emphasis on film and visual culture. He is author of multiple books and is current President of the California Chapters of the American Association of University Professors (CA-AAUP), President of the UC Santa Barbara Faculty Association (UCSB), and Vice-President for External Affairs of the Consortium of UC Faculty Associations (CUCFA).

 

The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts.

Please contact Werner Kuhn (werner@ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking.

Follow spatial@ucsb on Twitter | Google+ | Google Calendar

ThinkSpatial: Ambuj Singh

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On Tuesday, March 3, 2020, The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents

Inferring Network Structure and Flows using Partial Observations

Ambuj Singh

University of California Santa Barbara

12:00 p.m. Tuesday, January 21, 2020 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map)

Network

Abstract:

Predicting network structure and flows on edges is a precondition to effective planning and disaster response in critical infrastructure networks. I will summarize some ideas inspired by network science, physical modeling, and machine learning to determine this information from incomplete observations. Using both physical domain-specific and data-driven approaches, these algorithms address diverse problems including: the reconstruction of network topology and parameters, the estimation of network flows, the optimal selection and scheduling of multiple types of sensors, and the modeling of interdependencies in multilayer networks. The overall goal is to develop a rigorous theory for solving the inverse problem of edge and flow determination from observations of critical infrastructure networks.

Bio:

Ambuj Singh is a Professor of Computer Science at the University of California, Santa Barbara, with part-time appointments in the Biomolecular Science and Engineering Program and the Technology Management Program. He received a B.Tech. degree from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Texas at Austin. His research interests are broadly in the areas of network science, machine learning, social networks, and bioinformatics. He has published 200 technical papers over his career. He has led a number of multidisciplinary projects including UCSB’s Information Network Academic Research Center funded by the Army, Interdisciplinary Graduate Education Research and Training (IGERT) program on Network Science funded by the NSF, and the Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) on Network Science of Teams (https://muriteams.cs.ucsb.edu/) funded by the U.S. Army. He has graduated approximately 50 Ph.D., M.S., and postdoctoral students over his career, including 26 Ph.D. students.

The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts.

Please contact Werner Kuhn (kuhn@ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking.

Follow spatial@ucsb on Twitter | Google+ | Google Calendar

Brownbags 2018-2019

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The UCSB Brownbag Forum on Spatial Thinking

Informal noon-time presentations that feature theories, concepts, tools, and applications for spatial thinking across disciplines, including the natural and the social sciences, as well as the humanities. Presentations will take place at the Center for Spatial Studies, Phelps 3512, 12:00–1:00 pm.

Schedule 2018–2019

DateSpeaker/Topic
March 12, 2018Linda Adler-Kassner
University of California: Santa Barbara

Spatial Thinking as a Heuristic: Shaping Learning about Teaching
March 5, 2019Grant McKenzie
McGill University

Scooter-pocalypse: The When, Where, and Why of Scooter-sharing Services
December 11, 2018Wolfgang Maaß
Saarland University

Tapping into the Human Data Space: Predicting the Treatment Success of Obese Children
November 13, 2018Markus Hoffmann
Google

Quantum Computing @Google
October 23, 2018Elisabete Silva
LISA Lab, University of Cambridge
Cambridge, UK

Coming Home to the Land of Dynamic Spatial Analysis and Simulation:
Adaptive Planning Policy and Practice in a Seamless and Fast-Moving Digital World
October 2, 2018Qinghua Ding
Department of Geography
University of California, Santa Barbara

Recent Slow Melt of Arctic Summer Sea Ice caused by Tropical SST Changes

ThinkSpatial: Anna Trugman

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On Tuesday, March 17, 2020, The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents

The Geography of Forest Hydraulic Trait Compositions: Observed Patterns, underlying Mechanisms, and Future Implications

 

 

Anna Trugman

University of California Santa Barbara

12:00 p.m. Tuesday, March 17, 2020 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map)

 

ABSTRACT:

Tree hydraulic traits determine plant water use and tree vulnerability to drought stress, thereby affecting forest productivity and the movement of water between the land surface and the atmosphere. Here, I leverage an extensive trait database and a long-term continental forest plot network to map changes in community trait distributions and quantify “trait velocities” (the rate of change in community-weighted traits) for different regions and different forest types across the U.S. from 2000 to the present. I find evidence for shifts towards communities with more drought tolerant traits driven by tree mortality. I then review my ongoing work looking at the extent to which community trait compositional changes may buffer forest productivity and water fluxes in the near term from the effects of climate change.

BIO:

Anna Trugman is an Assistant Professor in the Geography Department. Her lab studies how changes in climate and water availability affect ecosystem diversity, productivity, and resilience across large spatial scales. Her research approach integrates field measurements with numerical ecosystem models to gain new insight into the biological processes affecting climate-vegetation interactions. Trugman received her Ph.D. in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences from Princeton University in 2017 and her B.S. in Geological and Environmental Science from Stanford University in 2011. From 2017–2019 Trugman was a USDA NIFA Postdoctoral Fellow in the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Utah.

 

The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts.

Please contact Werner Kuhn (kuhn@ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking.

Follow spatial@ucsb on Twitter | Google+ | Google Calendar

ThinkSpatial: Emmanuel Papadakis

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On Tuesday, January 21, 2020, The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents

Bridging Space and Place in Geographic Information Systems

Emmanuel Papadakis

University of California Santa Barbara

12:00 p.m. Tuesday, January 21, 2020 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map)

Abstract:

People refer, describe and interact with places; geographic information systems (GIS), however, are designed to visualize, process and analyze spaces. Both place and space are used to describe the geographic world, but each provides a different perspective. Place is an informal view framed by symbols, concepts and experience, whereas space is confined to the rigid digital world that adheres to mathematical formulas, data models and processes. Since digital systems have become a vital part of our lives, it is crucial to enable them to visualize, analyze and process the world as humans do. In this presentation, I will tackle a long-lasting question on whether spatial representation standards infused with semantics can create an adequate reflection of the geographical world as it is projected in the human mind. Using the concept of functions, I show how important aspects of place can be formalized and be integrated into GIS. Through examples on place-based search, I depict how a system can combine the processing and visualizing capabilities of machines with the sophisticated concept of place, contributing to the overall idea of a place-based GIS. Finally, I give some insights on further research that aims to incorporate emotions and similar concepts in the aforementioned formalization. Also, I propose the idea of an Algebra of Patterns, which focuses on innovative ways of conducting place synthesis, search, and discovery.

Bio:

Emmanuel Papadakis is a postdoctoral researcher at the Center for Spatial Studies in the Department of Geography at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He received his Ph.D. in Geoinformatics as a member of the Doctoral College GIScience within the Inter-faculty Department of Geoinformatics at the University of Salzburg in October 2019. He holds an M.Sc. and a B.Sc. degree in Computer Science from the University of Crete, Greece. His research focuses on modeling, knowledge representation and reasoning of vague concepts such as fuzzy spatiotemporal entities, spatial functions, places, environmental stress and others aiming to introduce formalizations that enable their digitization and effective integration in digital systems.

The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts.

Please contact Werner Kuhn (kuhn@ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking.

Follow spatial@ucsb on Twitter | Google+ | Google Calendar

ThinkSpatial: Somayeh Dodge

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On Tuesday, January 14, 2020, The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents

Multi-Scale Modeling and Analysis of Movement

Somayeh Dodge

University of California Santa Barbara

12:00 p.m. Tuesday, January 14, 2020 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map)

Abstract:

Movement is a complex multidimensional process that operates in a space-time-context continuum across multiple scales. Regardless of the context or entity type, movement happens through a series of embedded patterns at different granularities. Hence, the study of movement requires careful consideration and integration of all three forms of granularity (as in Kuhn (2012)): spatial (micro-steps to macro flows), temporal (high-frequency short-term events to low-frequency long-term processes), and thematic (individual movement to collective dynamics). This presentation reviews my ongoing work on synthesizing a multiscale model of movement through mining and integration of movement patterns at different granularities. Using movement ecology as an application, I show how multiscale analysis of trajectories are applied to identify patterns of movement at different frequencies and how these patterns can be combined in a multiscale model of movement to reconstruct trajectories.

Bio:

Somayeh Dodge serves as Assistant Professor of Spatial Data Science and leads the Move Laboratory in the Department of Geography at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She received her PhD in Geography with a specialization in Geographic Information Science (GIScience) from the University of Zurich, Switzerland in October 2011. She holds a MS degree in GIS Engineering and a BS degree in Geomatics Engineering from the KNT University of Technology, Iran. Dodge’s research focuses on developing data analytics, knowledge discovery, modeling, and visualization techniques to study movement in human and ecological systems. She has published in a number of high-ranked international journals such as Methods in Ecology and EvolutionInternational Journal of Geographic Information SciencePhilosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, Journal of Spatial Information Science (JOSIS)Movement EcologyComputers, Environment and Urban Systems (CEUS)Geographical Analysis, and Information Visualization. Dodge has recently been appointed as the Co-Editor in Chief of the Journal of Spatial Information Science. She currently serves on the editorial board of multiple journals including Geographical AnalysisCEUSJournal of Location Based Services, and The Professional Geographer.

The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts.

Please contact Werner Kuhn (kuhn@ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking.

Follow spatial@ucsb on Twitter | Google+ | Google Calendar

Limes – Who? What? When? Where? Why? A ThinkSpatial Recap

The Spatial Center was glad to invite Grant McKenzie, one of Geography’s own graduates, back from the chill of Montreal for a visit and talk on March 5. Formerly from the STKO lab, Grant is interested in how geographic information has a role to play in the study of the the intersection of information technology and society and what we can understand about human behavior.

At the Center, he presented some early exploration he and his group were doing on scooters as a form of public transportation. Here, he asked the audience if anyone frequently used Lime to get around (just one?!):

Engaging participants across disciplines -- Public Scooters
Engaging participants across disciplines — Public Scooters

This analysis led to a discussion about Lime’s function for users as a replacement for or adjacent to bike sharing and other form of shared economy transport means.

Introducing the Subject - Grant McKenzie
Introducing the Subject – Grant McKenzie

One of the takeaways? It looks like (in DC) bikes are used for commute (such as to and from work), whereas scooters are used for quick, short trips (average duration of just 5 minutes!).

Grant

 

ThinkSpatial: Linda Adler-Kassner

thinkspatial_logo On Tuesday, March 12, 2019, The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents

Spatial Thinking as a Heuristic:

Shaping Learning about Teaching

Linda Adler-Kassner

University of California Santa Barbara

Director, Center for Innovative Teaching, Research, and Learning
Associate Dean, Undergraduate Education
University of California, Santa Barbara

12:00 p.m. Tuesday, March 12, 2019 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map)

Abstract:

Teaching is a complex activity, especially for faculty members who are experts in their disciplines. Faculty members need to take into account a number of complex concepts associated with contexts for teaching and learning, disciplinary identities, representational practices, and students and their identities in order to make learning accessible. At the same time, the ways in which these ideas need to be considered are themselves areas of learning. Adler-Kassner will discuss how spatial thinking can serve as a visual metaphor for facilitating faculty members’ thinking about learning. As a faculty member whose research is bound up with contributing to a research-based teaching culture in our research university, she will describe the evolution of a spatial model intended to facilitate others’ thinking about epistemologically inclusive teaching. Since attendees are “also” teaching, feedback and discussion about the idea of spatial thinking as a heuristic will also be encouraged.

Bio: Linda Adler-Kassner is Professor of Writing Studies; Director of the Center for Innovative Teaching, Research, and Learning; and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education in the College of Letters and Science. Her research focuses broadly on how literacy is defined, taught, and assessed in disciplinary contexts, and on implications of those definitions for students, for teaching, and for public policy. Adler-Kassner is author, co-author, or co-editor of 11 books and more than 50 articles and book chapters and worked with faculty across the country on issues associated with teaching and learning. She has served as President of the Council of Writing Program Administrators, Chair of the Conference on College Composition and Communication, and board member of the National Council of Teachers of English. The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts. Please contact Werner Kuhn (kuhn@ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking. Follow spatial@ucsb on Twitter | Google+ | Google Calendar

ThinkSpatial: Grant McKenzie

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On Tuesday, March 5, 2019, The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents

Scooter-pocalypse: The When, Where, and Why of Scooter-sharing Services

Grant McKenzie

McGill University

12:00 p.m. Tuesday, March 5, 2019 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map)

 

Abstract:

We are currently in the midst of a technology-induced revolution in transportation. Ride-hailing services, short-term car rentals, and autonomous vehicles are altering the transportation status-quo. Within this environment, electric, short-term, scooter-sharing services are experiencing explosive growth and adoption in urban centers. Presented as a solution to the last-mile problem, privately funded scooter-share companies have inundated urban centers so quickly that municipal governments are struggling to evaluate the impacts on existing services, determine legality, and assess citizen safety. In much the same way that ride-hailing platforms are disrupting traditional taxi services, the introduction of this new mode of short-trip travel is shifting both public perception and actual usage of existing transportation systems. In this talk McKenzie will present ongoing work on exploring the nuanced spatial and temporal activity patterns of scooter-sharing services, contrasting them with government-funded bike-sharing and traditional motorized vehicle usage. In addition, he will discuss the sociodemographic divide in scooter usage in Washington, D.C. through a spatial lens.

Bio:

Grant McKenzie is an Assistant Professor of Geoinformatics in the Department of Geography at McGill University. Prior to this appointment, he was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Geographical Sciences at the University of Maryland, College Park and an affiliate faculty in the Center for Geospatial Information Science. At McGill, McKenzie leads the Platial Analysis Lab, an interdisciplinary research group that works at the intersection of information science and behavioral geography. Much of his work examines how human activities vary within and between local neighborhoods and global communities. This has driven his applied interests in financial accessibility, geoprivacy, and micro-mobility services as well as the broader role that GIScience plays at the intersection of information technologies and society. McKenzie is a founding member of the Seattle-based start-up consultancy Spatial Development International and has worked as a data scientist and software developer for a range of NGOs and leading technology companies.

The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts.

Please contact Werner Kuhn (kuhn@ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking.

Follow spatial@ucsb on Twitter | Google+ | Google Calendar

ThinkSpatial: Wolfgang Maaß

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On Tuesday, November 13, 2018, The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents

Tapping into the Human Data Space:
Predicting the Treatment Success of Obese Children

Wolfgang Maaß

Saarland University

12:00 p.m. Tuesday, December 11, 2018 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map)

Flyer

Abstract:

Childhood obesity is an increasingly pervasive problem. Traditional therapy programs are time- and cost-intensive. Furthermore, success of therapy is often not guaranteed. Typically, therapeutic success is determined by comparison of body mass index (BMI) before and after a therapy. We present a Data-analytical approach that provides predictions of future BMI changes before conducting a therapy. Parameters like age as well as heart rate during a standardized
exercise are considered. By predicting outcomes of a therapy, healthcare practitioners could personalize standard therapies and improve the outcome. We collected data from randomized clinical trial and trained Machine Learning models to estimate whether BMI will decrease after therapy with 85% accuracy. Accuracy of predictions is compared with domain experts’ predictions. Further, we present empirical results of the domain experts’ perception regarding the
proposed information system. The resulting system provides positive evidence as a tool for personalized medicine.

Bio:

Wolfgang Maaß is a professor in Business Informatics and professor in Computer Science (co-opted) at Saarland University, scientific director at the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI), and adjunct professor at Stony Brook University, Health Sciences Center School of Medicine, NY. He studied Computer Science at the RWTH Aachen and the Saarland University. His Ph.D. in Computer Science at the Saarland University was funded by the German
National Science Foundation (DFG). He was post-doc researcher at the Institute of Technology Management (ITEM) and Media and Communications Management Institute (MCM) at the University of St. Gallen, Switzerland where he also received his habilitation by the Department of Management. Previously he was lecturer at the University of St. Gallen and professor of media and computer science at Furtwangen University of Applied Sciences, Germany. He was guest professor at the Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology at MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, TX and at the Department for Biomedical Informatics at Stony Brook University Health Sciences Center School of Medicine, NY. In his research, he investigates the transformation of industries by applying methods of Artificial Intelligence.

The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts.

Please contact Werner Kuhn (kuhn@ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking.

Follow spatial@ucsb on Facebook | Twitter | Google+ | Google Calendar