Limes – Who? What? When? Where? Why? A ThinkSpatial Recap

Mar 12, 2019 • Categories: Event | News | Recap | ThinkSpatial

The Spatial Center was glad to invite Grant McKenzie, one of Geography’s own graduates, back from the chill of Montreal for a visit and talk on March 5. Formerly from the STKO lab, Grant is interested in how geographic information has a role to play in the study of the the intersection of information technology and society and what we can understand about human behavior. At the Center, he presented some early exploration he and his group were doing on scooters as a form of public transportation. Here, he asked the audience if anyone frequently used Lime to get around (just one?!): This analysis led to a discussion about Lime’s function for users as a replacement for or adjacent to bike sharing and other form of shared economy transport means. One of the takeaways? It looks like (in DC) bikes are used for commute (such as to and from work), whereas scooters are used for quick, short trips (average duration of just 5 minutes!)....

ThinkSpatial: Linda Adler-Kassner

Mar 7, 2019 • Categories: Event | News | ThinkSpatial

On Tuesday, March 12, 2019, The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents Spatial Thinking as a Heuristic: Shaping Learning about Teaching Linda Adler-Kassner University of California Santa Barbara Director, Center for Innovative Teaching, Research, and Learning Associate Dean, Undergraduate Education University of California, Santa Barbara 12:00 p.m. Tuesday, March 12, 2019 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map) Abstract: Teaching is a complex activity, especially for faculty members who are experts in their disciplines. Faculty members need to take into account a number of complex concepts associated with contexts for teaching and learning, disciplinary identities, representational practices, and students and their identities in order to make learning accessible. At the same time, the ways in which these ideas need to be considered are themselves areas of learning. Adler-Kassner will discuss how spatial thinking can serve as a visual metaphor for facilitating faculty members’ thinking about learning. As a faculty member whose research is bound up with contributing to a research-based teaching culture in our research university, she will describe the evolution of a spatial model intended to facilitate others’ thinking about epistemologically inclusive teaching. Since attendees are “also” teaching, feedback and discussion about the idea of spatial thinking as a heuristic will also be encouraged. Bio: Linda Adler-Kassner is Professor of Writing Studies; Director of the Center for Innovative Teaching, Research, and Learning; and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education in the College of Letters and Science. Her research focuses broadly on how literacy is defined, taught, and assessed in disciplinary contexts, and on implications of those definitions for students, for teaching, and for public policy. Adler-Kassner is author, co-author, or co-editor of 11 books and more than 50 articles and book chapters and worked with faculty across the country on issues associated with teaching and learning. She has served as President of the Council of Writing Program Administrators, Chair of the Conference on College Composition and Communication, and board member of the National Council of Teachers of English. — The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts. Please contact Werner Kuhn (kuhn@ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking. Follow spatial@ucsb on Twitter | Google+ | Google...

ThinkSpatial: Grant McKenzie

Feb 26, 2019 • Categories: Event | News | ThinkSpatial

On Tuesday, March 5, 2019, The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents Scooter-pocalypse: The When, Where, and Why of Scooter-sharing Services Grant McKenzie McGill University 12:00 p.m. Tuesday, March 5, 2019 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map)   Abstract: We are currently in the midst of a technology-induced revolution in transportation. Ride-hailing services, short-term car rentals, and autonomous vehicles are altering the transportation status-quo. Within this environment, electric, short-term, scooter-sharing services are experiencing explosive growth and adoption in urban centers. Presented as a solution to the last-mile problem, privately funded scooter-share companies have inundated urban centers so quickly that municipal governments are struggling to evaluate the impacts on existing services, determine legality, and assess citizen safety. In much the same way that ride-hailing platforms are disrupting traditional taxi services, the introduction of this new mode of short-trip travel is shifting both public perception and actual usage of existing transportation systems. In this talk McKenzie will present ongoing work on exploring the nuanced spatial and temporal activity patterns of scooter-sharing services, contrasting them with government-funded bike-sharing and traditional motorized vehicle usage. In addition, he will discuss the sociodemographic divide in scooter usage in Washington, D.C. through a spatial lens. Bio: Grant McKenzie is an Assistant Professor of Geoinformatics in the Department of Geography at McGill University. Prior to this appointment, he was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Geographical Sciences at the University of Maryland, College Park and an affiliate faculty in the Center for Geospatial Information Science. At McGill, McKenzie leads the Platial Analysis Lab, an interdisciplinary research group that works at the intersection of information science and behavioral geography. Much of his work examines how human activities vary within and between local neighborhoods and global communities. This has driven his applied interests in financial accessibility, geoprivacy, and micro-mobility services as well as the broader role that GIScience plays at the intersection of information technologies and society. McKenzie is a founding member of the Seattle-based start-up consultancy Spatial Development International and has worked as a data scientist and software developer for a range of NGOs and leading technology companies. — The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts. Please contact Werner Kuhn (kuhn@ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking. Follow spatial@ucsb on Twitter | Google+ | Google...

ThinkSpatial: Wolfgang Maaß

Dec 4, 2018 • Categories: Event | Featured | News | ThinkSpatial

On Tuesday, November 13, 2018, The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents Tapping into the Human Data Space: Predicting the Treatment Success of Obese Children Wolfgang Maaß Saarland University 12:00 p.m. Tuesday, December 11, 2018 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map) Flyer Abstract: Childhood obesity is an increasingly pervasive problem. Traditional therapy programs are time- and cost-intensive. Furthermore, success of therapy is often not guaranteed. Typically, therapeutic success is determined by comparison of body mass index (BMI) before and after a therapy. We present a Data-analytical approach that provides predictions of future BMI changes before conducting a therapy. Parameters like age as well as heart rate during a standardized exercise are considered. By predicting outcomes of a therapy, healthcare practitioners could personalize standard therapies and improve the outcome. We collected data from randomized clinical trial and trained Machine Learning models to estimate whether BMI will decrease after therapy with 85% accuracy. Accuracy of predictions is compared with domain experts’ predictions. Further, we present empirical results of the domain experts’ perception regarding the proposed information system. The resulting system provides positive evidence as a tool for personalized medicine. Bio: Wolfgang Maaß is a professor in Business Informatics and professor in Computer Science (co-opted) at Saarland University, scientific director at the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI), and adjunct professor at Stony Brook University, Health Sciences Center School of Medicine, NY. He studied Computer Science at the RWTH Aachen and the Saarland University. His Ph.D. in Computer Science at the Saarland University was funded by the German National Science Foundation (DFG). He was post-doc researcher at the Institute of Technology Management (ITEM) and Media and Communications Management Institute (MCM) at the University of St. Gallen, Switzerland where he also received his habilitation by the Department of Management. Previously he was lecturer at the University of St. Gallen and professor of media and computer science at Furtwangen University of Applied Sciences, Germany. He was guest professor at the Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology at MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, TX and at the Department for Biomedical Informatics at Stony Brook University Health Sciences Center School of Medicine, NY. In his research, he investigates the transformation of industries by applying methods of Artificial Intelligence. — The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts. Please contact Werner Kuhn (kuhn@ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking. Follow spatial@ucsb on Facebook | Twitter | Google+ | Google...

ThinkSpatial: Markus Hoffman

Oct 31, 2018 • Categories: Event | Featured | News | ThinkSpatial

On Tuesday, November 13, 2018, The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents Quantum Computing @Google Markus Hoffman Google 12:00 p.m. Tuesday, November 6, 2018 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map) Flyer Abstract: Google AI Quantum is advancing quantum computing by developing quantum processors and novel quantum algorithms to help researchers and developers solve near‐term problems both theoretical and practical. Believing that quantum computing will help us develop the innovations of tomorrow, including AI, we are committed to building dedicated quantum hardware and software today. Quantum computing is a new paradigm that will play a big role in accelerating tasks for AI. We want to offer researchers and developers access to open source frameworks and computing power that can operate beyond classical capabilities. This talk will provide an overview of Quantum Computing from theory, down to hardware and potential future realworld use cases. Bio: Markus Hoffman received his Ph.D. from the University of Freiburg in 2013. He has been working in the geographic information industry since 2005, joined the Google Maps team in 2014, and currently runs the Global Quantum Computing Practice in Google Cloud. https://www.linkedin.com/in/‐markushoffmann — The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts. Please contact Werner Kuhn (kuhn@ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking. Follow spatial@ucsb on Facebook | Twitter | Google+ | Google...

ThinkSpatial: Elisabete Silva

Oct 19, 2018 • Categories: Event | Featured | News | ThinkSpatial

On Tuesday, October 23, 2018, The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents Coming Home to the Land of Dynamic Spatial Analysis and Simulation: Adaptive Planning Policy and Practice in a Seamless and Fast-Moving Digital World Elisabete Silva Reader, Spatial Planning, Department of Land Economy Director, Lab of Interdisciplinary Spatial Analysis, LISA Lab 12:00 p.m. Tuesday, October 23, 2018 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map) Flyer Abstract: This presentation links theory and practice of planning, planning support systems and dynamic modelling in order to build the argument that new planning policy requires adaptive planning and models that go beyond static snapshots of analysis and scenarios. This move toward adaptive planning policy requires dynamic spatial models that produce multiple simulation scenarios through time & space that engage the public and the decision maker in the production of such results. By doing so, it requires a new practice of spatial planning, it questions the idea of certainty (proposing elasticity, the 75% confidence level for short term analysis and the 10% efficiency gain in certain policy contexts as best practice deliverables for spatial planning); it also requires a new vision for the legal and institutional framework of current planning policy and practice as well as the production of spatial plans. Ultimately it links dynamic spatial analysis with data science and complexity theory in order to develop Adaptive Planning Theory and Policy. The talk will present the context of today’s theory and practice in spatial dynamic simulation and will describe models developed during the past 25+ years as a way to evaluate the importance of adaptive planning policy in this new digital world. It will also question the current practice of both equation base and rule base modelling in the development of dynamic simulation and spatial analysis and will discuss the new contributions towards dynamic metrics, new calibration approaches, the key role of validation and cross-validation and the role of past and new data sets in a ‘smart-city’ policy context. Bio: Elisabete Silva has a research track record of approximately 20+ years, both at the public and private sector. Her research interests are centred on the application of new technologies to spatial planning in particular city and metropolitan dynamic modelling through space/time. The main subject areas include: land use change, transportation and spatial plans and policy, the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Spatial Analysis, Dynamic Simulation (in particular using CA and ABM) and New Technologies applied to Planning contexts.  She is the co-author of the Ashgate book, A planner’s encounter with complexity (2010); The Routledge Handbook of Planning Research Methods (2014); Comprehensive Geographic Information Systems (3): “GIS Applications for Socio-Economics and Humanity,” Elsevier. Main Editor Bo Huang, Volume 3 Editors: Kai Cao and Elisabete A. Silva (2017). Website: www.landecon.cam.ac.uk/directory/esilva Email: es424@cam.ac.uk — The objectives of the ThinkSpatial...