Spatial Tech Lunch: Mike Johnson

May 15, 2017 • Categories: Event | Spatial Tech Lunch

On Monday, May 22, from 12:00–1:00 pm please join us for the next Spatial Technology Lunch in Phelps Hall room 3512. This semi-regular series, hosted by spatial@ucsb, aims to promote discussion and interaction within the university’s spatial technology community. Please RSVP to Kitty Currier (kcurrier@spatial.ucsb.edu) by Sunday, May 21. Pizza and drinks will be provided. Accessing the National Water Model Mike Johnson Abstract: This talk will briefly introduce the National Water Model (NWM): a joint effort between NOAA, NCAR and the academic community to produce real-time and forecast streamflow predictions for all 2.7 million stream reaches across the continental US. It will cover methods for delineating local watersheds and exploring output via Hydro Share and if time permits will look at how this model is being used to forecast floods at the national scale. Mike Johnson is a graduate student at UCSB under Dr. Keith Clarke. His research focuses on water security and supply issues in California. Last summer he was a student participant at the National Water Center’s Summer Institute and will be returning this summer as a course...

Spatial Tech Lunch: James Allen

May 8, 2017 • Categories: Event | Spatial Tech Lunch

On Monday, May 15, from 12:00–1:00 pm please join us for the next Spatial Technology Lunch in Phelps Hall room 3512. This semi-regular series, hosted by spatial@ucsb, aims to promote discussion and interaction within the university’s spatial technology community. Please RSVP to Kitty Currier (kcurrier@spatial.ucsb.edu) by Sunday, May 14. Pizza and drinks will be provided.   Ocean Color in the North Atlantic and Beyond James Allen Abstract: Plankton ecosystems of the global ocean profoundly affect climate and life on Earth. The North Atlantic Aerosols and Marine Ecosystems Study (NAAMES) is a four-part interdisciplinary field campaign focusing on processes that control marine ecosystems and aerosols in the Western North Atlantic. Here, I will present results from the ocean optics portion of the first two cruises and how they relate to the annual plankton bloom cycle for the region. I will also show how this data will be used to help develop a global bio-optical algorithm that characterizes the global particle and phytoplankton size distribution using satellite remote sensing. James Allen is a graduate student in the Interdepartmental Graduate Program in Marine Science and is also housed in the Geography Department here at UCSB. He got his B.S. in Meteorology at the University of Tennessee at Martin, but now studies Ocean Optics and how to apply it as a tool to characterize global biogeochemical cycles. Currently, his research is focused on the NAAMES field campaign and building a satellite algorithm to determine the global particle and phytoplankton size distribution from...

Spatial Tech Lunch: Sara Lafia

Apr 18, 2017 • Categories: Event | Spatial Tech Lunch

On Tuesday, April 25, from 12:00–1:00 pm please join us for the next Spatial Technology Lunch in Phelps Hall room 3512. This semi-regular series, hosted by spatial@ucsb, aims to promote discussion and interaction within the university’s spatial technology community. Please RSVP to Kitty Currier (kcurrier@spatial.ucsb.edu) by Monday, April 24. Pizza and drinks will be provided.   Discovering and Sharing Campus Scholarship Spatially with UCSB Open Data Sara Lafia Graduate student Sara Lafia will give an overview of UCSB’s Open Data site, a developing campus-focused effort, built with contributions from the university library and researchers. Sara will discuss how the site makes research spatially discoverable and how students, administrators, researchers, and community members play important roles in the site’s future development. Selected contents currently discoverable through the site include: imagery from archaeologist Dr. Anabel Ford’s Maya Forest GIS; volunteered geographic information from biologist Dr. Douglas Macaulay’s lab; publications hosted across various repositories, like eScholarship; and layers of campus-specific information, ranging from bike path networks to the Cheadle Center for Biodiversity’s active work sites. Location integrates information; learn what you could discover and contribute to this new and exciting campus resource! Sara Lafia is a graduate student in the Geography Department at UCSB. She works with the UCSB Library and the Center for Spatial Studies on improving the spatial discovery of research data and documents. Her research addresses the question of how to spatially enable discovery of connected data and publications in a setting that allows for mapping and analysis using a Geographic Information System. She is also interested in the application of spatialization frameworks to non-spatial data, such as text, to gain new insights about themes of contents across data...

Spatial Tech Lunch: Susan Meerdink

Mar 14, 2017 • Categories: Event | Spatial Tech Lunch

On Wednesday, March 22, from 12:00–1:00 pm please join us for the next Spatial Technology Lunch in Phelps Hall room 3512. This semi-regular series, hosted by spatial@ucsb, aims to promote discussion and interaction within the university’s spatial technology community. Please RSVP to Kitty Currier (kcurrier@spatial.ucsb.edu) by Tuesday, March 21. Pizza and drinks will be provided.   Classifying California plant species throughout the drought using airborne hyperspectral imagery Susan Meerdink Abstract: Accurate knowledge of plant species seasonal and inter-annual distributions are required for many research and management agendas that track ecosystem health. Airborne imaging spectroscopy data have been successfully used to map species, but often only in a single season due to data availability. During California’s severe drought, NASA’s Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI) preparatory airborne campaign flew a visible near infrared/shortwave infrared (VSWIR) imaging spectrometer and a thermal infrared (TIR) multi-spectral imager providing the opportunity to improve species discrimination over a broader temporal range. Imagery was acquired in the spring, summer, and fall of 2013–2014 spanning from Santa Barbara to Bakersfield, CA. Overall classification was fairly uniform between seasons with accuracies ranging from 84–93%. However, individual species classification varied much more between dates with accuracies ranging from 10–78%. These results show that while overall image classification across seasons is accurate, classification performance may not be sufficient for applications that focus on a specific species of interest. This research contributes to efforts aimed at monitoring ecosystems across large spatial and temporal scales and ultimately supports many research agendas that are tracking ecosystem health and changes. Susan Meerdink is a Ph.D. Candidate in the UCSB Visualization & Image Processing for Environmental Research (VIPER) lab. She studies the ability to map plant species across seasons in the dynamic and diverse Southern California Mediterranean ecosystem. She uses various technologies to study plant health across environmental gradients and physiology’s effect on optical properties of plant species. Her research leverages a number of tools including novel quantitative methods, land surface temperature, and spectroscopy in the optical and thermal...

Spatial Tech Lunch: Beth Anderson

May 19, 2016 • Categories: Event | Spatial Tech Lunch

Please join us for our upcoming Spatial Technology Lunch   Down the rabbit hole: New methods and tools for visualizing scientific information   Beth Anderson CEO Arkitek Scientific Thursday, May 19, 2016; 12:00 p.m.; 3512 Phelps Hall (map) Includes lunch, requires RSVP by morning of Wednesday May 18   Abstract. Beth Anderson of Arkitek Scientific explores how 3D animation can be used to visually illuminate complex science for both scientific communities and laymen alike. How science is being done is changing, as both groups are increasingly called upon to understand very complicated phenomena: to further the field of knowledge, for health decisions, for STEM requirements and in political election cycles. How best to bridge the divide between disciplines, as well as between scientists and the public? Animations and simulations can provide mental grappling hooks for people seeking to learn about difficult subjects. They can open the door to greater interest and understanding because they are engaging, visually stunning and stimulate the viewer’s curiosity. New technologies like VR and MR will also be...

Spatial Tech Lunch: Alex Boone

Mar 29, 2016 • Categories: Event | Spatial Tech Lunch

Please join us for our upcoming Spatial Technology Lunch   Navigation in Virtual Environments: Measuring Strategy and Efficiency   Alex Boone Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences University of California, Santa Barbara Tuesday, March 29, 2016; 12:00 p.m.; 3512 Phelps Hall (map) Includes lunch, requires RSVP   Abstract. Over the past few decades, virtual environments have gained popularity as a methodology to study spatial navigation. In these studies, participants learn an environment and then navigate between learned locations. Our work seeks to establish the connection between measures of navigation strategy and navigation efficiency in virtual environments. We also seek to establish the relation between efficiency measures and often-used self-report spatial ability measures. We have developed measures of strategy and efficiency but we are currently interested in discussing the ways in which GIScience might be applied to these data to develop richer...