Spatial Tech Lunch: Jeff Onsted & Nathaniel Roth

Nov 18, 2018 • Categories: Event | Featured | Spatial Tech Lunch

On Wednesday, November 28, from 12:00–1:00 pm please join us for the next Spatial Technology Lunch in the Center for Spatial Studies (Phelps Hall 3512). This semi-regular series, hosted by spatial@ucsb, aims to promote discussion and interaction within the university’s spatial technology community. Please RSVP here by Monday, November 26. Sandwiches and drinks will be provided.   Science and Spatial Technology at the California Department of Conservation Jeffrey Onsted and Nathaniel Roth   Abstract: The California Department of Conservation’s scientists and engineers are dedicated to balancing today’s needs with tomorrow’s obligations by fostering the wise use and conservation of energy, land, and mineral resources. Our spatial technologies support this work by enabling us to collect, store, analyze, visualize, report, and share data on the state’s resources and serves as a core ingredient to discharging our regulatory, advisory, and conservation responsibilities. Whether mapping the state’s geology and geologic risks, identifying changes within the state’s agricultural spaces, managing portions of the state’s carbon portfolio, or regulating the California’s mineral and petroleum extraction industries, high quality spatial data is essential to meeting our mandates. With very few exceptions, all of our spatial data is either available now or will be in the very near future. Nathaniel Roth, Geographic Information Officer, California Department of Conservation, Ph.D. Geography, UC Davis,  2016; M.A. Geography, UC Davis 2012; B.S., Environmental Biology & Management, UC Davis 2000 Jeff Onsted, Chief Science Adviser, California Department of Conservation, Ph.D. Geography, UC Santa Barbara, 2007; M.A. Geography, UC Santa Barbara, 2002; B.A. Urban Studies and Planning, UC San Diego,...

Spatial Tech Lunch: Marthe Wens

May 30, 2018 • Categories: Event | Spatial Tech Lunch

On Wednesday, May 30, from 12:00–1:00 pm please join us for the next Spatial Technology Lunch in the Center for Spatial Studies (Phelps Hall 3512). This semi-regular series, hosted by spatial@ucsb, aims to promote discussion and interaction within the university’s spatial technology community. Please RSVP to Crystal Bae (cbae@spatial.ucsb.edu) by Monday, May 28. Pizza and drinks will be provided. Integrating heterogeneous, dynamic adaptation behaviour in drought risk modelling Marthe Wens Abstract: Droughts are a prevalent and costly hazard impacting urban, agricultural, and natural systems. Increasing climate variability is expected to exacerbate drought conditions in many parts of the world while evolving socio-economic conditions and adaptation strategies influence both short and long term risk to ecosystems, economies, and human health. Since adaptation strategies evolve over time, explicitly modeling these dynamics is important for understanding future risk. In this talk I will advocate extending the traditional drought-risk framework to better include the bilateral relationship between human and physical systems. The use of agent-based modeling technique to simulate the co-evolution of future drought hazard, exposure, vulnerability and heterogeneous, individual adaptation decisions, is showcased using a case study in Kitui, rural East Kenya. Marthe Wens is currently a PhD Student in the Department of Water and Climate Risk Institute for Environmental Studies at the Instituut voor Milieuvraagstukken...

Spatial Tech Lunch: Jorge Chen

May 22, 2018 • Categories: Event | Spatial Tech Lunch

On Tuesday, May 22, from 12:00–1:00 pm please join us for the next Spatial Technology Lunch in the Center for Spatial Studies (Phelps Hall 3512). This semi-regular series, hosted by spatial@ucsb, aims to promote discussion and interaction within the university’s spatial technology community. Please RSVP to Crystal Bae (cbae@spatial.ucsb.edu) by Sunday, May 20. Pizza and drinks will be provided. How well can a $750 DIY LiDAR scanner scan? Jorge Chen Abstract: Laser scanners provide a fast, convenient, and accurate way to take distance measurements of the surrounding environment. They operate by calculating the time it takes for a light beam to travel to a distant object and back using a process called light detection and ranging, or LiDAR, that, when repeated numerous times, forms a “point cloud” of (x,y,z) coordinates. Until very recently, only large enterprise users with big budgets could afford this type of technology, with the cost of most LiDAR scanners running well over $100K. However, the trickling down of LiDAR to consumer products has resulted in a new class of relatively cheap sensors that can now be found in robotic vacuum cleaners, drones, autonomous vehicles, and maybe even in upcoming smartphones. This presentation looks at the performance of the Scanse 3D panoramic LiDAR scanner, one of the first panoramic scanners designed for consumer use. At an incredible price of $750, this camera-sized do-it-yourself scanner uses a $150 LiDAR sensor attached to two orthogonally rotating servos that are controlled by open source software on a Raspberry Pi — all powered by an off-the-shelf cell phone charger. Performance assessment involved comparing measurements of a conference room taken with the Scanse 3D and a professional Trimble scanner. Results showed the Scanse consistently overestimated room dimensions by 15 cm, although at the local level of a flat surface it showed sub-centimeter accuracy, with high standard deviation and sub-centimeter precision. This latter result indicated systematic drift, which can be seen in a plot of the point cloud. Perhaps more interesting than the results, though, were the challenges faced in aligning the noisy and wavy Scanse data with the highly accurate and precise Trimble data. These were addressed using extended Gaussian image analysis, histogram analysis, and the iterative closest point process, all of which will be covered during the presentation. Jorge Chen is currently a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Geography at...

Spatial Tech Lunch: Sinan Yuan

Apr 30, 2018 • Categories: Event | Spatial Tech Lunch

On Monday, April 30, from 12:00–1:00 pm please join us for the next Spatial Technology Lunch in the Center for Spatial Studies (Phelps Hall 3512). This semi-regular series, hosted by spatial@ucsb, aims to promote discussion and interaction within the university’s spatial technology community. Please RSVP to Crystal Bae (cbae@spatial.ucsb.edu) by Saturday, April 28. Pizza and drinks will be provided. Experimental VR Research on Spatial Cognition in Chinese Traditional Villages Sinan Yuan Associate Prof. Department of Architecture Tianjin University, Tianjin, China Abstract: By using VR technology, the researcher establishes an experiment platform to analyze the spatial cognition process of people when they are wandering in the traditional Chinese villages. Xiamei and Chengcun, two traditional villages in northern Fujian province, were chosen as the samples in the experiment. The data of movements, head directions of the subjects in the experiment were collected as well as the corresponding subjective feedbacks during the experiment. Through data visualization and analysis, the research reveals the characteristics of the cognition and behavior of the participants when experiencing a complex space such as the traditional villages. Sinan Yuan is currently a visiting scholar at UCSB from Tianjin University in...

Spatial Tech Lunch: Erin Wetherley

Nov 29, 2017 • Categories: Event | Spatial Tech Lunch

On Tuesday, December 5, from 12:00–1:00 pm please join us for the next Spatial Technology Lunch in the Center for Spatial Studies (Phelps Hall 3512). This semi-regular series, hosted by spatial@ucsb, aims to promote discussion and interaction within the university’s spatial technology community. Please RSVP to Crystal Bae (cbae@spatial.ucsb.edu) by Sunday, December 3. Pizza and drinks will be provided. Evaluating vegetation type effects on land surface temperature at the city scale Erin Wetherley Abstract: The growing concentration of the global human population into cities has coincided with the rise of increasingly rich remote sensing data. Near-future hyperspectral/thermal satellites could revolutionize our understanding of urban environments by allowing us to discriminate urban materials and examine their thermal properties. With this wealth of information, we will be able to disentangle the links between land cover, management, and climate at the city scale for the very first time, with significant consequences for improved modeling of urban climate, energy, and water use, as well as targeted urban planning and public health initiatives. I will present new results in which we sampled the material and thermal heterogeneity of the Los Angeles, CA, metropolitan area (4,283 km2) to quantify, analyze, and model surface drivers of urban heat. We used airborne hyperspectral imagery (AVIRIS: 36 m resolution, 224 bands, 0.35 – 2.5 μm) to produce robust estimates of fine-scale (sub-pixel) urban patches, defined as mixtures of key urban surface classes. We then used airborne MASTER thermal imagery to quantify and model surface temperature changes as patch mixtures transitioned from low to high proportions of vegetation. Significant differences were observed between tree, turfgrass, senesced vegetation, and impervious mixtures. Finally, we used our modeled and measured temperatures to observe and quantify additional urban microclimate drivers beyond urban patch type, including income levels, building fraction, and irrigation. Erin Wetherley is a Ph.D. student at...

Spatial Tech Lunch: Alexandru Nichersu

Nov 7, 2017 • Categories: Event | Spatial Tech Lunch

On Tuesday, November 7, from 12:00–1:00 pm please join us for the next Spatial Technology Lunch in the Center for Spatial Studies (Phelps Hall 3512). This semi-regular series, hosted by spatial@ucsb, aims to promote discussion and interaction within the university’s spatial technology community. Please RSVP to Crystal Bae (cbae@spatial.ucsb.edu) by Sunday, November 5. Pizza and drinks will be provided. Spatio-temporal data integration for an integrated approach in the modelling of the city wide energy chain Alexandru Nichersu Abstract: With energy simulations of different complexity levels for smart cities and the concurrent IoT revolution we have observed an increase in the demand of spatial awareness for data coming from the energy sector. The measured or simulated data requires interoperability with semantical city models which allows for the quantification of environmental influences by using different spatial algorithms. In the presentation we describe our proposed approach to the integration of this data with both spatial and temporal variation. Alexandru Nichersu works in Energy Planning and Geosimulation at EIFER, the European Institute for Energy...