Dangermond Lecture: Claudia Bauzer-Medeiros (video)

May 1, 2017 • Categories: Event

See below for video of the Dangermond Lecture by Claudia Bauzer-Medeiros. Thursday, April 27, 2017 Buchanan 1930 3:30–4:45 pm Reception at 3512 Phelps following the lecture Claudia Bauzer-Medeiros Discovering and clearing paths through the world— The pros and cons of graph databases   Abstract: Graph Database systems are being increasingly adopted by the data research community for situations in which there is a need to explore ad hoc relationships across data elements. They are also being used, for instance, to help investigate connections in social networks, trophic cascades in species interactions, or the spreading of diseases. While these systems favor navigation across non-structured data, and the dynamic insertion and deletion of relationships among data elements, they are far from offering the same facilities available from relational databases. In particular, graph database systems suffer from the lack of a consensual data model or standardized storage structures, which in turn result in a wide range of solutions and (non-interoperable) implementations of a given problem. The talk will discuss some of the pros and cons of using such databases in spatial studies, illustrated via real examples involving the Brazilian water network. Bio: Claudia Bauzer Medeiros is a full professor of Computer science at the Institute of Computing (http://www.ic.unicamp.br/en), University of Campinas (Unicamp), Brazil (http://www.unicamp.br). She has received Brazilian and international awards for excellence in research, in teaching, and work in fostering the participation of women in computing, including the Change Agent Anita Borg Award, and the award from Google Brazil. She is a Commander of the Brazilian Order of Scientific Merit and a former Distinguished Speaker of the Association of Computing Machinery (ACM). She was awarded a Doctor Honoris Causa by the Universidad Antenor Orrego, Peru and by the University Paris-Dauphine, France. Her research is centered on the management and analysis of scientific data, to face the challenges posed by large, real world applications. This involves handling distributed and very heterogeneous data sources, at varying scales in space and time, ranging from satellite data to earthbound sensor networks. For the past 25 years, she has coordinated large multi-institutional, multidisciplinary projects in biodiversity, climate change, and in agricultural and environmental planning, involving universities in Brazil, Germany, and France. In 1994, she created the Laboratory of Information Systems at Unicamp (http://www.lis.ic.unicamp.br), one of the first research laboratories in Brazil dedicated to solving interdisciplinary problems involving scientific data. From 2003 to 2007 she was the President of the Brazilian Computer Society. Since 1998 she has served as member of permanent scientific evaluation panels in Brazil, both at the national level (CAPES and CNPq) and at the state of Sao Paulo (FAPESP- http://www.fapesp.br/en/) where she coordinates the eScience program...

ThinkSpatial: Dennis Whelan

Apr 25, 2017 • Categories: Event | ThinkSpatial

On Tuesday, May 2, 2017 The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents “A Brief But Spectacular History of UCSB Campus Planing.” Dennis Whelan Campus Planning & Design University of California, Santa Barbara 12:00 p.m. Tuesday, May 2, 2017 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map) Abstract: Everyone who visits the UCSB campus is struck by two things: first, the astonishing site on the Pacific Ocean with views of the Chanel Islands and the Santa Ynez mountains and then second, the astonishing disarray of the campus plan that works against all the natural physical attributes. The result of numerous planning attempts left partially realized, the campus is often bereft of the relationship of the campus to its surroundings; unable to see the ocean or the mountains, and frequently leaving the best sites to parking lots and loading docks. This short physical history of UCSB will seek to explain the history of the site, campus plans and suggest a way forward. Bio: Mr. Whelan received his BA in studio Art with a minor in the History of Architecture from UCSB in 1979. He received a Master of Architecture from UCLA in 1985. He is a licensed California Architect and Planner. His career at UCSB began as a work-study student as an undergraduate as a shop-drawing clerk in the Campus Architects office. After education and practice as an architect in Los Angeles and San Diego he returned to UCSB in 1991, and currently is involved with all phases of developing the physical campus, from bikepaths and signage to landscape and new capital projects. — The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts. Please contact Kitty Currier (kcurrier@spatial.ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking. Follow spatial@ucsb on Facebook | Twitter | Google+ | Google...

Spatial Tech Lunch: Sara Lafia

Apr 18, 2017 • Categories: Event | Spatial Tech Lunch

On Tuesday, April 25, from 12:00–1:00 pm please join us for the next Spatial Technology Lunch in Phelps Hall room 3512. This semi-regular series, hosted by spatial@ucsb, aims to promote discussion and interaction within the university’s spatial technology community. Please RSVP to Kitty Currier (kcurrier@spatial.ucsb.edu) by Monday, April 24. Pizza and drinks will be provided.   Discovering and Sharing Campus Scholarship Spatially with UCSB Open Data Sara Lafia Graduate student Sara Lafia will give an overview of UCSB’s Open Data site, a developing campus-focused effort, built with contributions from the university library and researchers. Sara will discuss how the site makes research spatially discoverable and how students, administrators, researchers, and community members play important roles in the site’s future development. Selected contents currently discoverable through the site include: imagery from archaeologist Dr. Anabel Ford’s Maya Forest GIS; volunteered geographic information from biologist Dr. Douglas Macaulay’s lab; publications hosted across various repositories, like eScholarship; and layers of campus-specific information, ranging from bike path networks to the Cheadle Center for Biodiversity’s active work sites. Location integrates information; learn what you could discover and contribute to this new and exciting campus resource! Sara Lafia is a graduate student in the Geography Department at UCSB. She works with the UCSB Library and the Center for Spatial Studies on improving the spatial discovery of research data and documents. Her research addresses the question of how to spatially enable discovery of connected data and publications in a setting that allows for mapping and analysis using a Geographic Information System. She is also interested in the application of spatialization frameworks to non-spatial data, such as text, to gain new insights about themes of contents across data...