ThinkSpatial: Markus Hoffman

Oct 31, 2018 • Categories: Event | Featured | ThinkSpatial

On Tuesday, November 13, 2018, The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents Quantum Computing @Google Markus Hoffman Google 12:00 p.m. Tuesday, November 6, 2018 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map) Flyer Abstract: Google AI Quantum is advancing quantum computing by developing quantum processors and novel quantum algorithms to help researchers and developers solve near‐term problems both theoretical and practical. Believing that quantum computing will help us develop the innovations of tomorrow, including AI, we are committed to building dedicated quantum hardware and software today. Quantum computing is a new paradigm that will play a big role in accelerating tasks for AI. We want to offer researchers and developers access to open source frameworks and computing power that can operate beyond classical capabilities. This talk will provide an overview of Quantum Computing from theory, down to hardware and potential future realworld use cases. Bio: Markus Hoffman received his Ph.D. from the University of Freiburg in 2013. He has been working in the geographic information industry since 2005, joined the Google Maps team in 2014, and currently runs the Global Quantum Computing Practice in Google Cloud. https://www.linkedin.com/in/‐markushoffmann — The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts. Please contact Werner Kuhn (kuhn@ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking. Follow spatial@ucsb on Facebook | Twitter | Google+ | Google...

ThinkSpatial: Elisabete Silva

Oct 19, 2018 • Categories: Event | ThinkSpatial

On Tuesday, October 23, 2018, The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents Coming Home to the Land of Dynamic Spatial Analysis and Simulation: Adaptive Planning Policy and Practice in a Seamless and Fast-Moving Digital World Elisabete Silva Reader, Spatial Planning, Department of Land Economy Director, Lab of Interdisciplinary Spatial Analysis, LISA Lab 12:00 p.m. Tuesday, October 23, 2018 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map) Flyer Abstract: This presentation links theory and practice of planning, planning support systems and dynamic modelling in order to build the argument that new planning policy requires adaptive planning and models that go beyond static snapshots of analysis and scenarios. This move toward adaptive planning policy requires dynamic spatial models that produce multiple simulation scenarios through time & space that engage the public and the decision maker in the production of such results. By doing so, it requires a new practice of spatial planning, it questions the idea of certainty (proposing elasticity, the 75% confidence level for short term analysis and the 10% efficiency gain in certain policy contexts as best practice deliverables for spatial planning); it also requires a new vision for the legal and institutional framework of current planning policy and practice as well as the production of spatial plans. Ultimately it links dynamic spatial analysis with data science and complexity theory in order to develop Adaptive Planning Theory and Policy. The talk will present the context of today’s theory and practice in spatial dynamic simulation and will describe models developed during the past 25+ years as a way to evaluate the importance of adaptive planning policy in this new digital world. It will also question the current practice of both equation base and rule base modelling in the development of dynamic simulation and spatial analysis and will discuss the new contributions towards dynamic metrics, new calibration approaches, the key role of validation and cross-validation and the role of past and new data sets in a ‘smart-city’ policy context. Bio: Elisabete Silva has a research track record of approximately 20+ years, both at the public and private sector. Her research interests are centred on the application of new technologies to spatial planning in particular city and metropolitan dynamic modelling through space/time. The main subject areas include: land use change, transportation and spatial plans and policy, the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Spatial Analysis, Dynamic Simulation (in particular using CA and ABM) and New Technologies applied to Planning contexts.  She is the co-author of the Ashgate book, A planner’s encounter with complexity (2010); The Routledge Handbook of Planning Research Methods (2014); Comprehensive Geographic Information Systems (3): “GIS Applications for Socio-Economics and Humanity,” Elsevier. Main Editor Bo Huang, Volume 3 Editors: Kai Cao and Elisabete A. Silva (2017). Website: www.landecon.cam.ac.uk/directory/esilva Email: es424@cam.ac.uk — The objectives of the ThinkSpatial...

Brownbags 2017-2018

The UCSB Brownbag Forum on Spatial Thinking   Informal noon-time presentations that feature theories, concepts, tools, and applications for spatial thinking across disciplines, including the natural and the social sciences, as well as the humanities. Presentations will take place at the Center for Spatial Studies, Phelps 3512, 12:00–1:00 pm. Schedule 2017–2018 DateSpeaker/Topic March 6, 2018Tim DeVries Department of Geography University of California, Santa Barbara Assimilating Spatial Data into a Global Ocean Model Flyer February 20, 2018Pyry Kettunen Finnish Geospatial Research Institute (FGI) How to Strengthen Technological Support for Wayfinding and Spatial Communication with Context-Dependent Landmarks and Geo-Pictures Flyer February 6, 2018Edzer Pebesma Institute for Geoinformatics University of Muenster How can units of measurement improve spatial data science? Flyer January 30, 2018Vena Chu Department of Geography University of California, Santa Barbara Hydrologic Dynamics of the Greenland Ice Sheet Flyer November 21, 2017Alexander Franks Department of Statistics University of California, Santa Barbara From Pixels to Points: Using Tracking Data to Measure Performance in Professional Sports Flyer November 14, 2017Amr El Abbadi Department of Computer Science University of California, Santa Barbara LocBorg: Location Privacy while Preserving Online Persona Flyer October 31, 2017Clodoveu Davis Computer Science Department Universidade Federal de Minas Gervais Spatial Integrity Constraints from Conceptual Modeling and their support in Spatially-extended DBMSs Flyer October 10, 2017Matto Mildenberger Department of Political Science University of California, Santa Barbara The Spatial Distribution of U.S. Climate and Energy Beliefs...

ThinkSpatial: Qinghua Ding

Sep 27, 2018 • Categories: Event | ThinkSpatial

On Tuesday, October 2, 2018, The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents Recent Slow Melt of Arctic Summer Sea Ice caused by Tropical SST Changes Qinghua Ding Department of Geography University of California, Santa Barbara 12:00 p.m. Tuesday, October 2, 2018 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map) Flyer Abstract: Arctic sea ice in September, the minimum observed area each year, is very sensitive to global climate variability. Thus, the abrupt decline of this minimum area since the 1980s has been viewed as a “canary in the coalmine” of human-caused climate change in the Arctic. However, over the recent decade the rate of decline has slowed to a near-zero change. This shift in the rate of sea-ice decline cannot be fully explained by the steady increase of greenhouse gas emissions over the same period. Here we show that this slow-down may be due to internal variability of sea surface temperatures in the Eastern tropical Pacific that generate atmospheric circulation change reaching the Arctic. This change in the Arctic atmosphere has resulted in abnormal, abrupt warming from the early 2000s to 2012 and relative cooling in the recent years in the Arctic that can partially enhance and mask the effects of human-induced warming during the corresponding periods. Given the importance of this internal process in driving the Arctic climate on low–frequency time scales, a better understanding of its underlying mechanisms will improve future projections of Arctic climate.. Bio: Qinghua Ding received his Ph.D. from the University of Hawaii in 2008. His Ph.D. work was to understand the Asian monsoon variability over the last 60 years and its linkage with global circulation variability. In 2010 he started to work at University of Washington as Research Associate on developing an isotope-enabled global climate model and understanding the recent climate change in the Arctic and Antarctic from the perspective of climate dynamics. He found that the recent warming trends in the Arctic and Antarctic are partly attributed to a tropical SST-related natural variability. He joined the Polar Science Center in 2014 and accepted a faculty position at UCSB in 2016. For future research, his focus is on exploring polar-lower latitude connections in the past 1000 years by using atmosphere-ocean-ice fully coupled GCMs, isotope-enabled GCMs and paleo-climate proxy data. The ultimate goal is to provide more reliable projections of the polar climate response to anthropogenic climate forcing. — The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts. Please contact Werner Kuhn (kuhn@ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary...

spatial@ucsb.local2018: Poster and Plenary Session

Jun 6, 2018 • Categories: Event | Featured | spatial@ucsb.local

Wednesday, June 6, 2018 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Corwin Pavilion Invitation & Agenda Speakers Posters The annual spatial@ucsb.local2018 Poster and Plenary Session was held on Wednesday, June 6, 2018 at Corwin Pavilion, from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. This year’s theme for the event was Improving Information Accuracy for Extreme Events. Keynotes were delivered by Jessica White (Direct Relief International), Chris Renschler (Dept. of Geography, University at Buffalo), and Brian Heath (Ventura County Fire Department). Representatives from the private sector and industry and campus-wide academics in the humanities, sciences, social sciences, and engineering programs were invited to showcase how spatial thinking facilitates research and creativity. A total of 53 posters were submitted for viewing. See agenda, speaker bios and abstracts, and a sampling of posters...