Limes – Who? What? When? Where? Why? A ThinkSpatial Recap

Mar 12, 2019 • Categories: Event | Featured | News | Recap | ThinkSpatial

The Spatial Center was glad to invite Grant McKenzie, one of Geography’s own graduates, back from the chill of Montreal for a visit and talk on March 5. Formerly from the STKO lab, Grant is interested in how geographic information has a role to play in the study of the the intersection of information technology and society and what we can understand about human behavior. At the Center, he presented some early exploration he and his group were doing on scooters as a form of public transportation. Here, he asked the audience if anyone frequently used Lime to get around (just one?!): This analysis led to a discussion about Lime’s function for users as a replacement for or adjacent to bike sharing and other form of shared economy transport means. One of the takeaways? It looks like (in DC) bikes are used for commute (such as to and from work), whereas scooters are used for quick, short trips (average duration of just 5 minutes!)....

Save the Date: Spatial Hangouts 2

Mar 12, 2019 • Categories: Event | Featured | News | Spatial Data Science Hangout

Dear all, After a successful first Spatial Data Science Hangout, we would like to run a follow-up on Monday March 18, 2019 from 12-1pm. We got a lot of positive feedback form many of you but even more importantly several useful suggestions on how to change the formula for the hangout and we will implement them for next week. We will also have a light lunch available for you. Finally, you can also join our slack channel if you plan to regularly participate in the hangout series:...

ThinkSpatial: Linda Adler-Kassner

Mar 7, 2019 • Categories: Event | News | ThinkSpatial

On Tuesday, March 12, 2019, The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents Spatial Thinking as a Heuristic: Shaping Learning about Teaching Linda Adler-Kassner University of California Santa Barbara Director, Center for Innovative Teaching, Research, and Learning Associate Dean, Undergraduate Education University of California, Santa Barbara 12:00 p.m. Tuesday, March 12, 2019 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map) Abstract: Teaching is a complex activity, especially for faculty members who are experts in their disciplines. Faculty members need to take into account a number of complex concepts associated with contexts for teaching and learning, disciplinary identities, representational practices, and students and their identities in order to make learning accessible. At the same time, the ways in which these ideas need to be considered are themselves areas of learning. Adler-Kassner will discuss how spatial thinking can serve as a visual metaphor for facilitating faculty members’ thinking about learning. As a faculty member whose research is bound up with contributing to a research-based teaching culture in our research university, she will describe the evolution of a spatial model intended to facilitate others’ thinking about epistemologically inclusive teaching. Since attendees are “also” teaching, feedback and discussion about the idea of spatial thinking as a heuristic will also be encouraged. Bio: Linda Adler-Kassner is Professor of Writing Studies; Director of the Center for Innovative Teaching, Research, and Learning; and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education in the College of Letters and Science. Her research focuses broadly on how literacy is defined, taught, and assessed in disciplinary contexts, and on implications of those definitions for students, for teaching, and for public policy. Adler-Kassner is author, co-author, or co-editor of 11 books and more than 50 articles and book chapters and worked with faculty across the country on issues associated with teaching and learning. She has served as President of the Council of Writing Program Administrators, Chair of the Conference on College Composition and Communication, and board member of the National Council of Teachers of English. — The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts. Please contact Werner Kuhn (kuhn@ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking. Follow spatial@ucsb on Twitter | Google+ | Google...

Beyond Place Names: Current Capabilities, Limitations, and Future Directions in Place- Based Search

Overview Please occasionally check back for updates and announcements. This full-day workshop on September 10, 2019 at COSIT 2019 is meant to attract participants with a research interest in place-based search. This workshop will advance discussion on two main topics: the current theoretical and technical limitations of place-based search and the limitations that can be addressed in the next few years. The morning session will focus on participant presentations and cataloging current limitations of place-based search through a hands-on activity. The afternoon session will be dedicated to general and breakout group discussion on if and how individual limitations can be addressed in the future. Those interested should submit a 2-3 page paper on current research on, or a position on future directions of place-based search. Please see details below.   Topic Currently, many search tools allow users to tailor results to a locality by specifying a place name or exploring a map. But how exactly do these tools interpret a place name, and do these interpretations capture an adequate representation of places? How valuable are these tools in their present form for place-based search? This workshop will investigate these questions and advance discussion on two topics: the current theoretical and technical limitations of place-based search and the limitations that can be addressed in the next few years. Place is a much discussed topic in the spatial information theory community, so emphasis at this workshop will be on how search tools in particular can, should, and do handle place references. Place-based search plateaued with the maturation of web mapping and location- based services and has since remained relatively undeveloped. In most text-based search tools, place names are handled, at best, as links to some geometric footprint stored in a gazetteer, which can then be used to query nearby, contained, or overlapping results. Other aspects of place, such as their enabling of events, people’s sense of place, and even variable interpretations of where places are remain outside current capacities of place-based search tools. Relevant work on place-based search can be found in contexts such as Digital Earths (e.g., Gore 1998), Digital Libraries (e.g., Lafia et al. 2016), Qualitative Spatial Reasoning, and Geographic Information Retrieval (GIR, e.g., the SPIRIT project (Jones et al. 2002)). However, place-based search is more specific than GIR, focusing on how place name interpretations influence search results. Many search tools in these and other contexts provide some form of geobrowsing, i.e., map-based search.   Gore, A. “The digital earth: understanding our planet in the 21st century.” Australian surveyor 43.2 (1998): 89-91. Jones, Christopher B., et al. “Spatial information retrieval and geographical ontologies an overview of the SPIRIT project.” Proceedings of the 25th annual international ACM SIGIR conference on...

Spatial Discovery III

Discovery III, the third and final specialist meeting on the topic of spatial discovery, marks the culmination of research and prototyping efforts to make research data discoverable by location. The meeting will expand discussions from the prior meeting held in May 2017, with the substantial new turn toward discovery in topic spaces. Recent developments at UCSB include experimentation with the expansion of visualization in ArcGIS Online to topic spaces and the propelling of research data curation efforts on campus through an NSF-supported pilot project. In addition to sharing and discussing research and development, the meeting seeks to discuss future prospects for enabling spatial discovery in a university library setting. Building on the productive disciplinary mixes of the 2015 and 2017 meetings,  librarians will again meet with GIS and information retrieval experts. For more information, please contact Karen Doehner...