Spatial Lightning Talks: Call for Presenters

Now recruiting presenters

for the 11th annual

Spatial Lightning Talks

to be held online via Airmeet on February 28, 2022 at 10:00 am PT

Submit your presentation idea here by February 11

Inspired by the Ignite Talks, the Spatial Lightning Talks feature intrepid presenters who have three minutes to deliver their idea, story, or argument. Topics may be wide-ranging, as long as they somehow relate to spatial thinking and/or analysis. Both serious and lighthearted presentations are  welcomed, as long as they stick to the mantra, “Enlighten us, but make it quick.”

Affiliates and non-affiliates of UCSB are invited to present and attend. With the online format, we hope to attract participants from around the globe.

2021 Lightning Talks screenshotExamples of past years’ titles:

  • “You Are Here” (Michael Goodchild, 2021; video)
  • “Human [reference] map” (Katy Börner, 2021; video)
  • “Your Smartphone, Organize It” (Thomas Crimmel, 2017; video)
  • “The Un-Spatial Talk” (Dan Montello, 2017; video)
  • “A Lovely Mess–A Brief History of UCSB Campus Plans” (Dennis Whelan, 2017; video)
  • “Acoustic Spatialization” (Elizabeth J. Hambleton, 2017; video)
  • “Why isn’t the US metric?” (Keith C. Clarke, 2015; video)
  • “Go West, Young Man: Consistency and Inconsistency in Cognitive Representations of Cardinal Directions” (Bernard Comrie,  2015; video)
  • “Polar Bears and Great Pyrenees Dogs: A Matter of Scale!” (Tommy Dickey and Hot Rod Linkin, 2015; video)
  • “Navigating Narratives as Networks” (Jeremy Douglass,  2014; video)
  • “Airports: The Good, the Bad, and the WTF” (Grant McKenzie,  2013; video)
  • “Marine Transportation: OOPS” (Rick Church, 2010; video)
  • and many more

We will try to accommodate all submissions, but if interest exceeds the available time slots, we will select talks based on their title and a brief description of the concept (1-3 sentences). Please submit your idea through this Google Form no later than February 11. Confirmation of presenters will be emailed by February 15.

Questions? Contact Kitty Currier, kcurrier@ucsb.edu. We look forward to your submission!

 

ThinkSpatial: Amanda Cravens

ThinkSpatial logo

The UCSB forum on spatial technologies presents

Effective decision support tools:
The importance of understanding user experiences and institutional barriers to doing so

Dr. Amanda Cravens

Social and Economic Analysis Branch, US Geological Survey

11:00 am (PT), Thursday, February 3, 2022 (online)

Please register here and confirm by clicking the link emailed to you upon registering.

Abstract: Adapting to climate change and variability, and their associated impacts, requires integrating scientific information into complex decision-making processes. Recognizing this challenge, there have been widespread calls for information providers and scientists to work closely with decision makers to ensure they produce datasets and tools that meet real-world needs. Despite the emphasis on integrating user needs into the design of resources, tool developers often do not understand the range of ways their tools are actually incorporated into the decisions of potential users nor the reasons why someone might opt not to use a seemingly-relevant tool. Therefore, there is a need to better understand the specific social and institutional factors that influence why users use (or do not use) particular resources as well as the strategies that tool developers use to engage with users. Using the Upper Colorado River Drought Early Warning System as a case study, this study explored both the process of tool development and the process by which tool users find relevant information for drought decision making. Understanding these two groups’ experiences suggests ways to more effectively design and implement decision support tools in the future.

Amanda CravensBio: Amanda Cravens is a Research Social Scientist with the US Geological Survey’s Social and Economic Analysis Branch in Fort Collins, CO. Amanda’s interdisciplinary research interests include the translation of scientific information into decision making, policies and institutions that influence environmental management, and understanding the cognitive and social processes that make decision support tools work effectively. She is also very interested in the practice of interdisciplinary science and has served as a member of multiple working groups as well as published on the role of creativity in science. She earned her PhD from Stanford University’s Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources and her MA in Geography from the University of Canterbury (New Zealand).

The objectives of the ThinkSpatial Forum are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts.

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ThinkSpatial: Janet Nackoney

ThinkSpatial logo

The UCSB forum on spatial technologies presents

Geospatial information informs conservation and community forest management in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

Dr. Janet Nackoney

United States Agency for International Development (USAID)
& Department of Geographical Sciences at the University of Maryland

11:00 am (PT), Thursday, January 13, 2022 (online)

See presentation slides, below.

Abstract: Geospatial tools and data are increasingly applied to help conservation managers develop more effective strategies for the protection and long-term conservation of species and the habitats they rely on. These data can help inform the quality or condition of habitats, locate areas most important for conservation prioritization, and systematically monitor areas that are vulnerable to land cover and land use change. Recent advances in satellite-based forest monitoring have significantly increased awareness about the geographic extent of the world’s tropical forests; decision-makers now have much greater access to valuable data and tools to detect forest loss and change over time. Here, geospatial data and tools were utilized to assist habitat monitoring and conservation prioritization for the bonobo (Pan paniscus), an endangered great ape that is endemic to the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Community mapping, geospatial analysis and modeling have helped identify conservation priorities for bonobos and other terrestrial species, monitor forest loss and habitat destruction, and promote community-based forest management with local communities.

Janet NackoneyBio: Dr. Janet Nackoney is jointly affiliated with the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Land and Resource Governance Division and the University of Maryland’s Department of Geographical Sciences. Janet is a trained geographer who uses geospatial data and technology to monitor tropical forests, conserve wildlife, manage land more sustainably, and promote food security. She is passionate about exploring the intersections and tensions between human and environment systems and helping to promote more inclusive and equitable access to land and property in the developing world. She currently serves on the Board of Directors for the Society for Conservation GIS (SCGIS) and for Congo Education Partners, which assists a small rural college in northern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).

Media:

ThinkSpatial-Nackoney

The objectives of the ThinkSpatial Forum are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts.

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ThinkSpatial: Chris S. Renschler

ThinkSpatial logo

The UCSB forum on spatial technologies presents

Building Interdisciplinary Teams for Environmental Management and Conservation Across Scales

Collaborative modeling exercise

Chris S. Renschler, Ph.D.

Dept. of Geography, University at Buffalo (SUNY), Buffalo, NY, USA

11:00 am (PT), Thursday, December 9, 2021 (online)

Time-lapse video of participatory mapping exercise pictured above

Abstract: Over the past two years, the National Science Foundation funded the initiation of a regional research network on sustainable development and community resilience in the Lower Great Lakes. OUTSTEPS.org utilizes a novel approach to engage scientists, stakeholders, and Indigenous Rightsholders to look at natural and social processes from a new perspective when addressing regional climate change and land use changes in coastal watersheds. The approach creates interdisciplinary teams to investigate spatial and temporal patterns around conservation and development challenges under climate change. Team individuals identify their expertise and interest in the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the seven PEOPLES Resilience Framework Dimensions. This approach allows participants to converge as matching research partners creating interconnected teams working collaboratively on innovative research questions hypotheses at the regional scale. Several projects at the local scale feature a focus on assessing more detailed process patterns in environmental management and conservation. Among them are process-based modeling of runoff and soil redistribution, bioacoustics and bat habitat assessment, and a discussion to integrate social-cultural aspects in climate change impact and adaption assessment at the local scales.

Bio: Chris S. Renschler is a Professor in Geography and Director of the Geographic Information and Analysis Lab (GIAL) at the University at Buffalo (SUNY), Buffalo, NY. He is also the Director of the Landscape-based Environmental System Analysis & Modeling (LESAM) Lab. Renschler is recognized internationally as an expert and scholar in soil and water conservation, integrated watershed, natural resources, and hazards management. His research, teaching, and outreach activities include the development, validation, and application of integrated hydrology and sediment modeling tools developed collaboratively by scientists, engineers, and practitioners to support effective decision- and policy-making under global climate and land use/land cover change.

The objectives of the ThinkSpatial Forum are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts.

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ThinkSpatial: John Gallo

ThinkSpatial logoThe UCSB forum on spatial technologies presents

A Spatial Decision Support System and Open Knowledge Network for Fire-Risk Reduction in Santa Barbara County

John Gallo, Ph.D.

Conservation Biology Institute

11:00 am (PT), Thursday, December 2, 2021

View a PDF of the presentation’s slides.

Abstract. Extreme wildfire events are an increasing threat to both human and natural communities in the Western United States. Efforts to mitigate this threat are extremely complex and involve a bevy of jurisdictions and competing interests. Spatial Decision Support Systems (SDSS) can help these socio-political processes come to consensus on where people should do what treatments. Open Knowledge Networks (OKN), in addition, can help with the aspatial aspects of decision-making and action. Through this “Regional Priority Planning” project, funded by the California Coastal Conservancy and in part by the National Science Foundation, we pilot an SDSS and an OKN for Wildfire Risk Reduction in Santa Barbara County. The SDSS uses the Environmental Evaluation Modeling System (EEMS), a multicriteria combination software with a graphical user interface in DataBasin.org and eemsonline.org. SDSS development continues as part of the Regional Wildfire Mitigation Program funded by the National Wildlife Foundation. I will detail the SDSS and give a demonstration of its use. The OKN, which is in a more preliminary phase, will be described in terms of its underlying science, path and process.

John GalloBio. John Gallo is a geographer and landscape ecologist performing “action research” for the past 20 years in conservation planning, spatial decision support systems, citizen science, habitat connectivity software development, and community knowledge sharing. Action research uses best practices and explores scientific frontiers while performing applied projects. He received a Ph.D. in Geography at the University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB), under the direction of Professor Michael Goodchild, with several fellowships including the Jack and Laura Dangermond award for exceptional “promise in Geographic Information Science.” He received his B.A. in Environmental Studies and his B.S. in Ecology and Evolution, also at UCSB, with top honors. He is Senior Scientist at the Conservation Biology Institute, a non-profit organization that bridges science and practice, and that has built many spatial applications such as Databasin.org, a participatory GIS platform with 40,000 users and 30,000 datasets. Gallo’s favorite hobbies are birdwatching, ultimate frisbee, surfing, and hiking.

The objectives of the ThinkSpatial Forum are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts.

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Brownbags 2020-2021

thinkspatial_logo

The UCSB Brownbag Forum on Spatial Thinking

 

Informal presentations that feature theories, concepts, tools, and applications for spatial thinking across disciplines, including the natural and the social sciences, as well as the humanities. Due to the closure of UCSB for COVID-19, presentations that normally take place at the Center for Spatial Studies, Phelps 3512, will temporarily be hosted via Zoom meeting.

Schedule 2020-2021

DateSpeaker/Topic
April 8, 2021Armin Haller
Australian National University

What Are Links in Linked Open Data? A Characterization and Evaluation of Links between Knowledge Graphs on the Web
December 1, 2020Gengchen Mai
STKO Lab. University of California, Santa Barbara

Space2Vec: Multi-Scale Representation Learning for Spatial Feature Distributions using Grid Cells
November 24. 2020Patricia Murrieta-Flores
Lancaster University

Subaltern Spatial Thinking: Towards a decolonial approach to spatial technologies
October 27, 2020Karl Grossner
University of Pittsburgh World History Center

Representing Place for World Historical Gazetteer
October 13, 2020Nicola Guarino
ISTC-CNR Laboratory for Applied Ontology, Trento

Events and their (spatial) context: on the semantics of locative modifiers
October 6, 2020Anna Trugman
University of California, Santa Barbara

The Geography of Forest Hydraulic Trait Compositions: Observed Patterns, underlying Mechanisms, and Future Implications
September 17, 2020Martin Doerr
Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas

Identifiable Individuals and Reality - What Do We Describe and Why

Brownbags 2019-2020

thinkspatial_logo

The UCSB Brownbag Forum on Spatial Thinking

 

Informal presentations that feature theories, concepts, tools, and applications for spatial thinking across disciplines, including the natural and the social sciences, as well as the humanities. Due to the closure of UCSB for COVID-19, presentations that normally take place at the Center for Spatial Studies, Phelps 3512, will temporarily be hosted via Zoom meeting.

Schedule 2019-2020

DateSpeaker/Topic
June 2, 2020Liz Ackert
University of California Santa Barbara

Latinx Destinations and Health
May 5, 2020Alina Ristea
Northeastern University, Boston

Spatial Crime Patterns vs Safety Perception: Mixed Experiments
April 28, 2020Konstandinos G. Goulias
University of California Santa Barbara

Life Cycle Stages, Daily Contacts, and Activity-Travel Time Allocation for the Benefit of Self and Others
April 21, 2020George Baryannis
University of Huddersfield, United Kingdom

Qualitative Spatial Reasoning Using Answer Set Programming
March 10, 2020Claudio Fugo (cancelled, to be rescheduled)
University of California Santa Barbara

The Fishing Net and the Spider Web—Making Italians Making Southerners
March 3, 2020Ambuj Singh University of California Santa Barbara

Inferring Network Structure and Flows using Partial Observations
January 21, 2020Emmanuel Papadakis
University of California Santa Barbara

Bridging Space and Place in Geographic Information Systems
January 14, 2020Somayeh Dodge
University of California Santa Barbara

Multiscale Modeling and Analysis of Movement

Occasional Events

An archive of events that are not annual occurrences.

  • Dangermond Lectures: Annual lectures delivered in the Department of Geography colloquium series by an internationally outstanding researcher in geographic information science, supported through a gift from Jack and Laura Dangermond. (Includes videos archived since 2016)
  • GIS Days:  As part of Geography Awareness Week, the annual GIS Day enables GIS users and researchers to exchange ideas and present their work to a wide audience.
  • Golledge Lectures: The Reginald Golledge Distinguished Lecture in Geography was instituted in 1984, when Prof. Reginald Golledge lost his sight. Although Reg passed away in May 2009, the Golledge Distinguished Lecture continues in his honor as part of the Department of Geography colloquium series.
  • Hosted Conferences: Conferences hosted by the UCSB Center for Spatial Studies.
  • Spatial Unconferences: Outreach to domain specialists and applications of spatial information as a primary force to push the frontiers of Geographic Information Science, Spatial Cognition, and related fields.

Spatial Data Science Hangout Series: Reproducibility

The Center for Spatial Studies invites you to join us on Thursday May 20 at 9:00 a.m PT for the next Spatial Data Science Hangout on Reproducibility in Data Science Research. For this special event, we are thrilled to welcome two reproducibility experts as speakers: Daniel Nüst (Institute for Geoinformatics, University of Münster) and Casey O’Hara (BREN School, UC Santa Barbara). 

Don’t miss this event! Everyone is welcome to participate, just keep in mind that these hangouts are meant to be a comfortable environment for graduate students and early career researchers to brainstorm, talk through their imaginative ideas, discuss, and learn from each other.  

To participate in this event, please register here

Upon registration, you will receive a confirmation email with Zoom login details

Casey O’Hara is a PhD candidate in the BREN School at UCSB. After completing his MESM degree in 2014, Casey has worked on the Ocean Health Index, applying data science to communicate the range of economic, ecological, and cultural benefits people can sustainably derive from healthy oceans. In his research, he applies spatial analysis and data science principles to examine the ecological and socioeconomic impacts of human activity and climate change on marine biodiversity.

Abstract: In his talk, Casey will give a short introduction to his paper on better science in less time using open data science tools, including a quick introduction to GitHub for version control and communication, and a comparison of the pros and cons of spatial analysis using ArcMap GIS, ArcMap ModelBuilder, and R. Casey will wrap up his talk by presenting some quick results from his most recent paper: At-risk marine biodiversity faces extensive, expanding, and intensifying human impacts.

Daniel Nüst (https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0024-5046) is a researcher at the Spatio-temporal Modelling Lab at the Institute for Geoinformatics at the University of Münster. Daniel pursues a Ph.D. in the context of the DFG project, Opening Reproducible Research, where he develops tools for creation and execution of research compendia in geography and the geosciences. His professional interest is improving the scholarly publication process with new information technology—of course, with Open Source software! Daniel is reproducibility chair at the AGILE conference series and vice chair of the German association for research software engineering.

Abstract: In his talk, Daniel will give a short introduction to his paper on practical reproducibility in geography and geosciences and present some advanced technologies for reproducibility (notebooks, containers, Binder). Daniel will wrap up his talk by discussing  how reproducibility should be taken into account during peer review and give a brief overview of the initiatives CODECHECK and Reproducible AGILE. 

 

NSF Convergence Accelerator Series Tracks A&B: Carole Goble

FAIRy Stories: The FAIR Data Principles in Theory and in Practice

Carole Goble

University of Manchester

Wednesday, May 19, 2021. 9:00 a.m. (PT)

Required Zoom Registration: here.

Upon registration, you will receive a confirmation email with Zoom login details

The National Science Foundation’s (NSF) tracks A and B of the Convergence Accelerator program is proud to present Carole Goble in its 2021/2022 speaker series on Open Knowledge Networks. The series features researchers and practitioners widely recognized for their contribution to knowledge graphs, knowledge engineering, and FAIR data.

Abstract. The “FAIR Guiding Principles for scientific data management and stewardship” [1] launched a global dialogue within research and policy communities and started a journey to wider accessibility and reusability of data and preparedness for automation-readiness (I am one of the armies of authors). Over the past 5 years, FAIR has become a movement, a mantra, and a methodology for scientific research and, increasingly, in the commercial and public sector. FAIR is now part of NIH, the European Commission, and OECD policy. But just figuring out what the FAIR principles really mean and how we implement them has proved more challenging than one might have guessed. To quote the novelist Rick Riordan “Fairness does not mean everyone gets the same. Fairness means everyone gets what they need.”

As a data infrastructure wrangler, I lead and participate in projects implementing forms of FAIR in pan-national European biomedical Research Infrastructures. We apply web-based industry-led approaches like Schema.org; work with big pharma on specialized FAIRification pipelines for legacy data; promote FAIR by Design methodologies and platforms into the researcher lab; and expand the principles of FAIR beyond data to computational workflows and digital objects. Many use Linked Data approaches.

In this talk, I will use some of these projects to shine some light on the FAIR movement. Spoiler alert: Although there are technical issues, the greatest challenges are social. FAIR is a team sport. Knowledge Graphs play a role—not just as consumers of FAIR data but as active contributors. To paraphrase another novelist, “It is a truth universally acknowledged that a Knowledge Graph must be in want of FAIR data.”

[1] Wilkinson, M., Dumontier, M., Aalbersberg, I. et al. The FAIR Guiding Principles for scientific data management and stewardship. Sci Data 3, 160018 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1038/sdata.2016.18.

Bio: Carole Goble is a Professor of Computer Science at the University of Manchester, UK, where she leads a team of Researchers, Research Software Engineers, and Data Stewards. She has spent 25 years working in e-Science on reproducible science, open data and method sharing, knowledge and metadata management and computational workflows in a range of disciplines, and has led many scientific and e-Infrastructure projects and resources at the national and European level. She was an early pioneer of semantic web and linked data approaches in the Life Sciences.

Goble is extensively involved in ELIXIR, the pan-national European Research Infrastructures for Life Science data, and the European Open Science Cloud. She is a co-founder of the UK’s Software Sustainability Institute, coordinates the FAIRDOM infrastructure for research project assets management, and leads work at the international level on FAIR Research Objects and workflows. An advocate of FAIR and Open Data, she serves as the UK representative on the G7 Open Science Working Group and is one of the authors of the original FAIR data principles paper.

Please contact us for follow-up questions.

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