Save the Date: Spatial Lightning Talks 2020

Save the Date!

The UCSB Center for Spatial Studies presents the 2020 Spatial Lightning Talks on Tuesday, February 11 at 12:00 p.m. This annual series of 3-minute lightning talks brings together speakers from across the UCSB campus as well as the local community to enlighten the crowd on a broad range of spatial topics. This fast-paced, interdisciplinary event is a great opportunity to hear speakers from across campus and in the local community share their work and special interests. Program to be published soon.

When: Tuesday, February 11, 2020 from 12:00 to 1:15 p.m. Lunch will be provided beginning at 11:45 a.m. Where: Interdisciplinary Humanities Center, McCune Conference Room (6020 HSSB).
RSVP HERE. Hope to see you there!

Spatial Lightning Talks 2020 — Is Here!

The UCSB Center for Spatial Studies presents the 2020 Spatial Lightning Talks on Tuesday, February 11 at 12:00 p.m. This annual series of 3-minute lightning talks brings together speakers from across the UCSB campus as well as the local community to enlighten the crowd on a broad range of spatial topics. This fast-paced, interdisciplinary event is a great opportunity to hear speakers from across campus and in the local community share their work and special interests. This year, we bring together an exciting line-up of speakers – see the line-up below! This year, we have some stars from Geography, English, Statistics, Global Studies, Marine Science, as well as off-campus leaders (General Electric, SB Women in STEM).

When: Tuesday, February 11, 2020 from 12:00 to 1:00 p.m. Lunch will be provided beginning at 11:45 a.m. Where: Interdisciplinary Humanities Center, McCune Conference Room (6020 HSSB). Hope to see you there!

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ThinkSpatial: Emmanuel Papadakis

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On Tuesday, January 21, 2020, The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents

Bridging Space and Place in Geographic Information Systems

Emmanuel Papadakis

University of California Santa Barbara

12:00 p.m. Tuesday, January 21, 2020 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map)

Abstract:

People refer, describe and interact with places; geographic information systems (GIS), however, are designed to visualize, process and analyze spaces. Both place and space are used to describe the geographic world, but each provides a different perspective. Place is an informal view framed by symbols, concepts and experience, whereas space is confined to the rigid digital world that adheres to mathematical formulas, data models and processes. Since digital systems have become a vital part of our lives, it is crucial to enable them to visualize, analyze and process the world as humans do. In this presentation, I will tackle a long-lasting question on whether spatial representation standards infused with semantics can create an adequate reflection of the geographical world as it is projected in the human mind. Using the concept of functions, I show how important aspects of place can be formalized and be integrated into GIS. Through examples on place-based search, I depict how a system can combine the processing and visualizing capabilities of machines with the sophisticated concept of place, contributing to the overall idea of a place-based GIS. Finally, I give some insights on further research that aims to incorporate emotions and similar concepts in the aforementioned formalization. Also, I propose the idea of an Algebra of Patterns, which focuses on innovative ways of conducting place synthesis, search, and discovery.

Bio:

Emmanuel Papadakis is a postdoctoral researcher at the Center for Spatial Studies in the Department of Geography at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He received his Ph.D. in Geoinformatics as a member of the Doctoral College GIScience within the Inter-faculty Department of Geoinformatics at the University of Salzburg in October 2019. He holds an M.Sc. and a B.Sc. degree in Computer Science from the University of Crete, Greece. His research focuses on modeling, knowledge representation and reasoning of vague concepts such as fuzzy spatiotemporal entities, spatial functions, places, environmental stress and others aiming to introduce formalizations that enable their digitization and effective integration in digital systems.

The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts.

Please contact Werner Kuhn (kuhn@ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking.

Follow spatial@ucsb on Twitter | Google+ | Google Calendar

ThinkSpatial: Somayeh Dodge

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On Tuesday, January 14, 2020, The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents

Multi-Scale Modeling and Analysis of Movement

Somayeh Dodge

University of California Santa Barbara

12:00 p.m. Tuesday, January 14, 2020 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map)

Abstract:

Movement is a complex multidimensional process that operates in a space-time-context continuum across multiple scales. Regardless of the context or entity type, movement happens through a series of embedded patterns at different granularities. Hence, the study of movement requires careful consideration and integration of all three forms of granularity (as in Kuhn (2012)): spatial (micro-steps to macro flows), temporal (high-frequency short-term events to low-frequency long-term processes), and thematic (individual movement to collective dynamics). This presentation reviews my ongoing work on synthesizing a multiscale model of movement through mining and integration of movement patterns at different granularities. Using movement ecology as an application, I show how multiscale analysis of trajectories are applied to identify patterns of movement at different frequencies and how these patterns can be combined in a multiscale model of movement to reconstruct trajectories.

Bio:

Somayeh Dodge serves as Assistant Professor of Spatial Data Science and leads the Move Laboratory in the Department of Geography at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She received her PhD in Geography with a specialization in Geographic Information Science (GIScience) from the University of Zurich, Switzerland in October 2011. She holds a MS degree in GIS Engineering and a BS degree in Geomatics Engineering from the KNT University of Technology, Iran. Dodge’s research focuses on developing data analytics, knowledge discovery, modeling, and visualization techniques to study movement in human and ecological systems. She has published in a number of high-ranked international journals such as Methods in Ecology and EvolutionInternational Journal of Geographic Information SciencePhilosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, Journal of Spatial Information Science (JOSIS)Movement EcologyComputers, Environment and Urban Systems (CEUS)Geographical Analysis, and Information Visualization. Dodge has recently been appointed as the Co-Editor in Chief of the Journal of Spatial Information Science. She currently serves on the editorial board of multiple journals including Geographical AnalysisCEUSJournal of Location Based Services, and The Professional Geographer.

The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts.

Please contact Werner Kuhn (kuhn@ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking.

Follow spatial@ucsb on Twitter | Google+ | Google Calendar

Spatial Data Science Hangout Series: November 2019

T next seminar in the Center for Spatial Studies’ Spatial Data Hangouts series will be on Tuesday, 11/19 from 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m. at 3512 Phelps Hall. All grad students are invited to attend.

Continuing the theme of finding academic employment, where we discuss why and how to apply for a professorship, we will continue last month’s discussion of the academic hiring process and talk about interviews on-site and per teleconference. We will also do at least one test run to give you a chance to practice. Hence, if you would like to volunteer and be interviewed in front of the other students, please let Jano or Karen know.

We will be providing a light lunch after the discussion. Please contact Karen Doehner if you plan to attend.

 

Spatial Tech Lunch: Dan Baciu

On Tuesday, November 12, from 12:00–1:00 pm please join us for the next Spatial Technology Lunch in the Center for Spatial Studies (Phelps Hall 3512). This semi-regular series, hosted by spatial@ucsb, aims to promote discussion and interaction within the university’s spatial technology community. Please RSVP here by Friday, November 8. Sandwiches and drinks will be provided.

The Geography of Cultures: New Methods for Decoding, Analysis, and Synthesis

Dan Baciu

 

Abstract: It is tempting to believe that ideas and culture are free to spread and therefore free of geography. However, the phenomenon of “culture shock” most dramatically questions and limits the validity of such hypothesis: When chasing your dreams and horizons, you may end up in a different culture on a different continent, and, under those circumstances, you may loose your sense of self. Geography and culture are inseparable because geography is an important medium for cultural life.

Although people carry their cultural values with them, they may reach a place where those values no longer apply. So to say, their cultural currency is no longer accepted—but this anecdotal evidence should really only raise interest in new research directions with global implications. At UCSB, Benjamin Cohen has shown that money has surprising geographies with massive political consequences on a global stage. Dan C. Baciu, supported by the Interpretation Lab, continues along this path but goes further in studying the geography of cultures. In an age of information and knowledge, as Alvin and Heidi Toffler contemplated, cultures are the new currencies. Companies are no longer valued for their transaction volume alone, but also for their ability to amass information about people and their cultures. Yet, how are these personal, local, and global scales of culture interconnected? And how do mass and social media shift geographical distributions and reshape entire systems of value?

Studying these questions, Dan Baciu envisioned and probed new methods of extracting geographical information from public media. Instead of relying on gazetteers, his team uses natural language processing and publicly contributed knowledge bases. This makes it possible to create many interconnected layers of geography, history, and cultural circles, allowing for the application of a richer stock of analysis and synthesis methods. In turn, these new possibilities for empirical assessment allow for the testing of new theory about the relationships between individuals, cultural cannons, and shared global geography.

Imagine collecting hundreds of thousands of books, news, social media, and TV for everything called “Chicago school,” “Humanities,” and “Science.” What would these data reveal? Dr. Baciu and his collaborators used supercomputing to decode natural language, and they went on to enrich these data with geographical and historical information. Furthermore, they combined historical evaluations with data analysis, dimensionality reductions, and classification. Finally, to make sense of their results, they developed interfaces to interactively visualize distributions and stratification. Their GeoD and 7D toolkit is expected to be released to the public in a forthcoming research article.

The newly discovered geographical distributions of culture are surprising: There are maps of science, humanities, universities networks, postmodernism, national parks, oceanography, study abroad, and many more. And these geographies are not as you expect them. If you think that the U.S. Dollar is limited to the U.S., and that national parks are where they are, you will be surprised. The new methods allow us to refine our understanding of how culture grows in geographical space.

The new methods of analysis and synthesis were driven by theory and questions that preoccupied Dr. Baciu already during his Ph.D.; and the new findings confirm his earlier postulates. For him, the newly discovered geographical distributions are no longer surprising. Although new to humanities scholars, the theoretical foundations of his work are not new to everyone. Equivalent mathematics are a textbook-case of evolutionary dynamics already.

“United we stand” inspires not only collaborative spirit, but also a new research direction in the study of urban culture and diversity. “United” in this context means learning to listen to everyone. Dan C. Baciu has shaped this research direction most recently as Postdoc in English at UC Santa Barbara.

Spatial Data Science Hangout Series: Fall 2019

Spatial Data Science Hangouts Poster

After a successful first run in the last academic year, the Center for Spatial Studies will again be hosting the Spatial Data Hangouts, with the first one on Thursday, 10/17 from 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m. at 3512 Phelps Hall. All grad students are invited to attend.

With the season for academic jobs starting, the next few spatial data science hangouts will be used to to discuss why and how to apply for a professorship, eg., how to write your cover letters, what makes a good recommendation letter, how to structure your CV, how to score during the on-site interviews and your talk, how to negotiate, and so on.

We will focus on jobs in spatial data science, GIScience, remote sensing, spatial cognition, and so on, but most of what we will discuss applies to academic employment in general. We will do all this in a hands-on, interactive style.

We will be providing a light lunch after the discussion. Please contact Karen Doehner if you plan to attend.

 

Specialist Meetings

Our annual specialist meetings bring experts from academia and industry together to discuss a specific topic in depth. The proceedings of each event, including presentations and position papers, are made available online and stored in the Spatial Archives.

Leadership workshop on Location Analytics in Business
Location Analytics is the subset of Business Analytics that is concerned with gaining insights by analyzing the spatial component of business data. Leading retail, real estate, finance, manufacturing, and logistics firms, among others, implement location strategies to gain competitive advantage. Furthermore, a new generation of business researchers and educators is beginning to recognize location analytics as a distinctive professional specialty. The role of academics in this field can be to simplify location analysis, propose innovative new theories and methodologies, and educate business and technology leaders.
The Center for Spatial Studies, along with ESRI will hold a 4-day “leadership workshop on Location Analytics in Business” to be held on December 10–14, 2017, at the Upham Hotel in downtown Santa Barbara. Read more.

Spatial Discovery II—2017
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In 2015, the UCSB Library and the Center for Spatial Studies received a private grant to study and address the challenges that libraries and researchers face in making research data discoverable via spatial metadata on diverse platforms and in a variety of environments. The goal of this project is an expanded awareness and adoption of spatial discovery and analysis in research and teaching, supported by novel library services.
Partnering in this project with the Center for Spatial Studies, the UCSB Library convened a second expert meeting, “Spatial Discovery II,” which was held at the Upham Hotel and the UCSB campus on May 11 and 12, 2017 in Santa Barbara.
Read more.

Universals and Variation in Spatial Referencing across Cultures and Languages—2016
Specialist Meeting on Universals and Variation in Spatial Referencing across Cultures and Languages. The meeting was sponsored by the Center for Spatial Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara and held on December 7–9, 2016, at the Upham Hotel in Santa Barbara, CA. Read more…
Spatial Discovery—2015
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Participants contributed expertise in Library Science, as well as knowledge pertaining to spatial information and relevant research on data-seeking behavior. Five keynote addresses as well as several plenary and break-out discussions explored the challenges, best practices, and potential strategies associated with the cross-platform discovery of spatial data in the context of modern libraries.
Read more.

Keynote PresentationsPositions PapersFinal Report

Spatial Search—2014
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Intense and focused discussions contributed toward the development of an interdisciplinary research agenda to advance spatial search for information from computational, geospatial, and cognitive perspectives. Read more.

Call for PapersPositions PapersFinal Report

Advancing the Spatially Enabled Smart Campus—2013
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December 11–12, 2013

“Advancing the Spatially Enabled Smart Campus”

This two-day meeting engaged academic and industry representatives with interest in conceiving, designing, and building a smart campus in a discussion of the Smart Campus.

Call for papersPositions PapersFinal report

Spatial Thinking Across the College Curriculum—2012
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SILC
December 10–11, 2012

“Spatial Thinking Across the College Curriculum”

This two-day specialist meeting discussed the challenges of spatial thinking in different disciplines, cognitive analyses of spatial thinking processes, and current best practices in educating spatial thinking.

Call for papersPositions PapersFinal Report

Future Directions in Spatial Demography—2011
Specialist Meeting on Future Directions in Spatial Demography

December 12–13, 2011

“Future Directions in Spatial Demography”

A two-day workshop for the presentation, discussion, and summarization of current challenges and opportunities for spatial demography

Call for papersPositions PapersFinal Report

Spatio-Temporal Constraints on Social Networks—2010
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December 13–14, 2010

“Spatio-Temporal Constraints on Social Networks”

A two-day workshop for the presentation, discussion, and summarization of current issues and opportunities on the topic of Spatio-Temporal Constraints on Social Networks was convened at the Upham Hotel in Santa Barbara. The primary presentations were as follows:

The social networking perspective (Kathleen Carley)

The geospatial perspective (Mike Goodchild)

The computational perspective (James Caverlee)

The visualization perspective (Shih-Lung Shaw)

The social perspective (Matt Zook)

Spatial
December 15–16, 2008

“Spatial Thinking in Science and Design”

Discussions of the potential of integrating design more fully into GIS, and over the development of curriculum in spatial thinking were the objectives of the two-day specialist meeting.
The central questions posed were:

“To what extent are the fundamental spatial concepts that lie behind GIS relevant in design?”
“To what extent can the fundamental spatial concepts of design be addressed with GIS?”
“Is it possible to devise a curriculum designed to develop spatial thinking in both GIS and design?”

The meeting was attended by 38 GIS and design specialists from the U.S. and Europe, and included a number of context-setting presentations and ample time for discussion in small groups. The group adjourned, agreeing to hold a follow-up discussion in January 2010, in Redlands, CA.

View the agenda

View the presentations

20th Anniversary of NCGIA—2008
20th Anniversary of NCGIA

December 10–12, 2008

20th Anniversary of NCGIA

UCSB Symposium

Marking the beginning of National Science Foundation funding for the National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis (NCGIA) at its three sites, the University of California, Santa Barbara, the University at Buffalo, and the University of Maine, December 1, 2008 represented the twentieth anniversary of NCGIA. In honor of this occasion, a symposium was held at which retrospective and prospective analyses of the work of NCGIA were reviewed.

View the agenda

View the presentations

View NCGIA memorabilia

Volunteered Geographic Information—2007
December 13–14, 2007

Volunteered Geographic Information

Accommodations and Travel

Lodging

We have arranged for a block of rooms at discounted rates at the Upham Hotel, and we will pay for three nights in a standard single room. However, if you would like an upgraded room or would like to extend your stay for an early arrival or late departure, we will ask you to assume the extra cost.

Upham Hotel (www.uphamhotel.com)

1404 De La Vina St.

Santa Barbara, CA 93101

(805) 962-0058

(800) 727-0876

If you plan to stay at the Upham Hotel, please let Karen Doehner (kdoehner@spatial.ucsb.edu) know what your travel dates/times are and if you require an upgraded room. She will provide the hotel with a rooming list, and will need your request for lodging no later than Friday, November 15. At check-in, simply reference “spatial.” 

There is no need for you to call the hotel, it only duplicates their records and gets confusing.

Travel

All participants are expected to book their own round-trip travel to Santa Barbara and, upon arrival, to submit their receipts for reimbursement. Suggested travel dates are Sunday, December 8 and Wednesday afternoon, December 11.

The Santa Barbara Municipal Airport (SBA) is about 8 miles from the hotel and is served by commuter affiliates of most major airlines. Airlines with flights to Santa Barbara are:

American Airlines 1 (800) 433-7300
Alaska Airlines 1 (800) 252-7522
Delta Airlines 1 (800) 221-1212
United Airlines 1 (800) 864-8331
US Airways 1 (800) 428-4322

The best way from the airport to the Upham is by taxi. If you do not fly directly into Santa Barbara, ground travel is available from LAX to Santa Barbara through the Santa Barbara Airbus (http://www.sbairbus.com/). Fares are cheaper when booked early, and discounted fares are offered if you are traveling with a companion. Reservations can be made online or by calling their toll-free number, +1 (800) 423-1618. If arriving on the Airbus, get off at the Santa Barbara stop (the Hyatt Hotel, 1111 E. Cabrillo Blvd.) and take a taxi to the Upham from there.

Dining

We will be arranging for your lunches and possibly one dinner during the meeting days; breakfast is included in the hotel rate and is available in the hotel lobby. Please let Karen know if you are vegetarian or have any dietary preferences or restrictions that we should take into consideration when arranging for the meals.