Research

Core Concepts of Spatial Information
The Core Concepts of Spatial Information are a set of concepts designed to facilitate spatial computing
and reduce its complexity in order to broaden access to GIS and other tools (Kuhn, 2012). Read more…

Minor in Spatial Studies

Course requirements Complete Course Listing Winter 2018 Course Listings View Minor flyer Please note: Geography majors are now eligible for the Minor in Spatial Studies. The Center for Spatial Studies is pleased to cooperate with the Department of Geography and the College of Letters and Science to provide advisory support for students seeking to complement their disciplinary majors with a Minor in Spatial Studies. Spatial Studies is framed as an interdisciplinary minor that recognizes the many disciplinary origins of innovations in spatial reasoning, representation, and analysis. General information or document submission: Thursdays, 11 a.m.–1 p.m., 1832 Ellison Hall (except for 10/26); or by appointment: kdoehner@spatial.ucsb.edu; Academic advising: Wednesdays, 3–4 p.m., 3512 Phelps Hall; or by appointment: Werner Kuhn. With upper-division courses from more than two-dozen disciplines listed for the minor, students can tap into a creative mix of ideas and tools to enhance their majors and career orientations with spatial perspectives. For the Minor in Spatial Studies, a student selects one of three focus areas that allies most clearly with his/her areas of disciplinary and/or career interest. These include: (a) Spatial Thinking, (b) Space and Place, and (c) Spatial Science. The curricula for these areas of study include a breadth of courses that reflect the pervasive nature of spatial reasoning across diverse fields of knowledge. Focus in Spatial Thinking The Spatial Thinking focus emphasizes spatial cognition and reasoning associated with problem solving and representation, and applications of both elementary and complex reasoning processes in different domains of human activity and knowledge development. This focus represents a concentration on the science of spatial learning at individual and societal levels, and on the mental associations that facilitate learning about and functioning within human and natural environments. Focus in Spatial Science The Spatial Science focus emphasizes the analysis and visualization of information, featuring courses that build methodological and technological competencies for documenting space-time patterns and processes about phenomena in the physical world as well as about behavior and its consequences in the human world. In the design disciplines (including some branches of engineering) the focus is on problem solving and product development that frequently entails the (re)arrangement of spatial entities and documentation of the consequences thereafter. Focus in Space and Place The Space and Place focus builds on courses that apply spatial reasoning and visualization in the humanities. Examples include creative and aesthetic renderings (e.g., stories, visualizations, sounds, and fine arts), the design of lived-in environments that reflect and accommodate human values and activities, the documentation and assessment of affinity to sense of place and region, and communication through use of spatial metaphor and spatialized languages. Geography W12 (Maps and Spatial Reasoning), the required common course for the minor, treats the fundamental science of mapping, including the underlying mathematics...

Linked Data for GIScience

This page is a starter pack for faculty, students, and developers, who are interested in applying Linked Data solutions in the context of GIScience. OWL tutorials http://www.w3.org/TR/sw-oosd-primer http://www.w3schools.com/webservices/ws_rdf_owl.asp http://www.obitko.com/tutorials/ontologies-semantic-web/owl-example-with-rdf-graph.html https://code.google.com/p/tdwg-rdf/wiki/Beginners7OWL http://www.cambridgesemantics.com/semantic-university/owl-101 Books David Wood et al. (2013) Linked Data: Structured data on the Web. Greenwich, CT: Manning. Development manuals Editors Protégé: http://protege.stanford.edu Geospatial resources W3C Geospatial Semantic Web (GeoSemWeb) Wiki Academic articles Kuhn, W, Kauppinen, T, Janowicz, K (2014). Linked data–A paradigm shift for geographic information science. In Geographic Information Science (pp. 173-186). [PDF] Scheider S, Degbelo A, Kuhn W, Przibytzin H (2014). Content and context—How linked spatio-temporal data enables novel information services for libraries. GIS.Science (4): 138-149. Trame J, Keßler C, Kuhn W (2013). Linked Data and Time—Modeling Researcher Life Lines by Events. 11th International Conference on Spatial Information Theory (COSIT). Springer-Verlag, Lecture Notes in Computer Science 8116:...

Spatial Un-conferences

Our bi-annual SPATIAL un-conferences are designed to bring domain experts together to inspire and guide research on spatial information. Each edition will focus on applications of spatial information as a primary force to push the frontiers of Geographic Information Science, Spatial Cognition, and related fields. SPATIAL...

Sitemap

Current sitemap of spatial.ucsb.edu. Call Community Relations Contact Location Core Concepts of Spatial Information CoSSI 2017 CoSSI 2017 – COSIT Workshop on Cognitive Scales of Spatial Information CoSSI Workshop Committee Course Listings Course Requirements Credits Education Course Syllabi Freshman Seminar Imagine a nation of spatial thinkers Learning Resources Classics in Spatial Thinking Distorted Maps Map Projections Online Map Viewers and Map Making R programming language Spatial Concepts Spatial Data & Map Links Spatial Reasoning in the Arts and Sciences TeachSpatial UCSB Mapping Resources Virtual Globes Minor in Spatial Studies Spatial Pathways Spatial Courses at UCSB Spatial Education at UCSB Events Brownbag forum on spatial thinking Brownbags 2007-2008 Brownbags 2008-2009 Brownbags 2009-2010 Brownbags 2010-2011 Brownbags 2011-2012 Brownbags 2012-2013 Brownbags 2013-2014 Thinkspatial Brownbag Presentations Brownbags 2014–2015 Brownbags 2015-2016 Brownbags 2016-2017 Calendar Conference Presentations Dangermond Lecture Graduate Student Forums Lightning Talks Lightning Talks 2013 – videos Presentations by spatial@ucsb researchers Spatial Technology Lunches Spatial Un-conferences SPATIAL 2015 SPATIAL 2015 – Accommodations SPATIAL 2015 – Participants and Papers SPATIAL 2015 – Program SPATIAL 2015 – Registration SPATIAL 2015 – Registration SPATIAL 2015 – Travel spatial@ucsb.local Spatial@local08 Posters Spatial@local09 Posters Spatial@local10 Posters spatial@local10 Presentations Spatial@local11 Posters spatial@local11 Presentations spatial@local12 Posters spatial@local12 Presentations spatial@local13 posters Special Spatial Events Specialist Meetings #9502 (no title) #9735 (no title) Accommodations and Travel Accommodations and Travel Accommodations and Travel ASESC Home ASESC Participants ASESC Travel Leadership Workshop on Location Analytics in Business Reimbursement Reimbursement Spatial Discovery Spatial Discovery II Spatial Discovery II – Participants and Papers Spatial Discovery – Accommodations and Travel Spatial Discovery – Agenda Spatial Discovery – Participants and Papers Spatial Discovery – Reimbursement Spatial Reference – Participants and Papers Spatial Reference – Presentations Spatial Search Spatial Search – Accommodation and Travel Spatial Search – Participants Spatial Search – Agenda Spatial Search – Reimbursement Requirements Spatial Search – Submissions Spatial Thinking Across the College Curriculum Universals and Variation in Spatial Referencing across Cultures and Languages Visitor Presentations GIS Help Desk GIS Help Desk Workshops Jeff Howarth Miguel Gómez de Antonio Nathaniel Royal Our vision Activity Reports Donor Support Spatial Thinking Timeline of spatial@ucsb Vertices Newsletter People Alan Glennon Alfred Stein Alinda Friedman Andrea Ballatore Andrea Nuernberger Andrew Stull Ann Taves Antonio Medrano Arnold Bregt Behzad Vahedi Ben Lei Bo Yan Bryan Karaffa Carla D’Antonio Cecilia Xia Chris​ Chien​ Crystal Bae Daniel Lewis Denise Stephens Donald Janelle Douglas Burbank Federica Burini Gagandeep Makker Georgios Technitis Heather Burte Indy Hurt James Frew Jeganathan Chockalingam Jingyi Xiao JoAnn Kuchera-Morin Jordan Hastings Kai Cao Karen Doehner Karl Grossner Kitty Currier Krzysztof Janowicz Kun Lee Lisa Parks Marcela Suárez Margaret R. Tarampi Markus Knauff Mary Hegarty Matthew Turk Michael Goodchild Michael Wang Michela Teobaldi Noah Gluschankoff Robert T. Deacon Sara Lafia Savannah...

Our vision

The vision of the Center for Spatial Studies is that spatial thinking and computing serve all disciplines and promote inter-disciplinary problem solving. The Center mission is to engage in interdisciplinary research and education in how people and technology solve spatial problems in the natural and social sciences, as well as in engineering, the humanities, and the arts. To progress toward its vision and implement its mission, the Center supports research and education in: formulating spatially explicit hypotheses, visualizing and analyzing data spatially and spatio-temporally, across academic disciplines, searching, integrating, and publishing data organized by space, time, and topic, understanding the nature of  spatial thinking and cognition and applying this understanding to foster the development of adaptive spatial thinking, and developing new spatial computational technologies, and studying the cognitive, social and cultural impacts of these technologies. These tasks must sometimes be defined and written into proposals; in other cases, they may already have been proposed or funded and need to be implemented. The Center offers its conceptual and technical expertise at any stage of the identification of a project and implementation of its research goals. It establishes long-term collaborations on campus through service and education, as well as through interdisciplinary research projects. The Center’s research and educational activities include: hosting the ThinkSpatial brown-bag forum, Tech Lunch Discussions on spatial technologies, and an annual firework of 3-minute Spatial Lightning Talks, coordinating  the undergraduate Minor in Spatial Studies and a Freshman Seminar on Spatial Thinking, conducting international specialist meetings, workshops, and conferences, collaborating in research with other campus researchers and visiting scholars, providing a Help Desk with free consultation on spatial information technologies, and reaching out to local communities through technology transfer events, such as spatial@ucsb.local, and supporting K-12 educators in the use of spatial technologies at schools. A full listing of our activities are summarized in the Center for Spatial Studies Activity Reports, which were published in 2010, 2013, and 2016. We strongly encourage you to discuss your research and educational projects with us, to further our collective understanding and awareness of the importance of spatial thinking and computing across the disciplines. Werner...