Architecture and Mind Research Focus Group

Apr 30, 2016 • Categories: Event | News | Related Initiatives | Research

The UCSB Architecture and Mind Research Focus Group (RFG) is a forum comprised of faculty, graduate students, and design practitioners. Convened for the 2015-2016 academic year by Professors Volker Welter (History of Art and Architecture), Mary Hegarty (Psychological and Brain Sciences), and Daniel Montello (Geography), the group discusses design, aesthetics, and human experience. The group is dedicated to readings about and discussions of the various ways in which the humanities, cognitive psychology, and behavioral/cognitive geography examine and think about human comprehension of space and place, orientation within a designed environment, perception of architectural and aesthetic details, and architecture’s relations to both the human body and mind. During a recent visit to Los Angeles, the group enjoyed an exploration of the Schindler House, in West Hollywood, and the Eames House, in Pacific Palisades, taking a break for lunch at the L.A. Farmers Market at 3rd and Fairfax. Experiencing these homes and public spaces brought this year’s readings on spatial orientation, social interaction, and perception to life. The Schindler House, constructed in 1922, is notable for its extension of indoor space to outdoor living areas and is one of Rudolph Schindler’s most important surviving works. It also notable for its experimental domestic design, intended to support the co-habitation of two married couples, Rudolph and Pauline Schindler, and Clyde and Marian Chace. The research group engaged with the home by writing their impressions of the physical spaces within the home. The group also learned about preservation efforts during a tour of the home. Following the visit to the Schindler House, the group toured another experiment in domestic dwelling. The Eames House, finished in 1949, was part of the The Case Study House Program, constructed with modular industrial-grade materials and intended to serve as both a home and an artists’ studio. The theme of transparency, extending interior space to the exterior, was reinforced by the house’s characteristic glass walls. At the next Architecture and Mind meeting, members of the RFG look forward to assessing the group’s reactions to the spaces, and discussing the role that these homes played as microcosms of greater social shifts revolutionizing the modern domestic sphere. The Interdisciplinary Humanities Center (IHC) supports this research group, and the Center for Spatial Studies subsidized the cost of the field trip. For more information about the RFG, please see:...

ACM video: Andrea Ballatore on map personalization

Nov 30, 2015 • Categories: News | Research

Andrea Ballatore (UCSB) and Michela Bertolotto (University College Dublin) published an article entitled “Personalizing Maps” in the December issue of Communications of the ACM. To accompany it, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) has produced a video documentary featuring the Center for Spatial Studies and Andrea Ballatore: Article in Communications of the ACM  –  Open Access author copy Abstract: Geographic maps constitute a ubiquitous medium through which we understand, construct, and navigate our natural and built surroundings. At the intersection of the explosion of geographic information online, data-mining techniques, and the increasing popularity of Web maps, a novel possibility has emerged: Instead of generating one map for large numbers of users, user profiling and implicit feedback analysis can support creation of a different map for each person. The automated personalization of the map-making process is still in its infancy but has the potential to provide more relevant maps to millions of users worldwide....

ThinkSpatial: Martin Raubal

Nov 24, 2015 • Categories: Event | ThinkSpatial

The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents Investigating human behavior in urban environments   Martin Raubal, Professor of Geoinformation Engineering, ETH Zurich 12:00 p.m. Tuesday, November 24, 2015 | Phelps Hall 3512 (map) Abstract. In recent decades a majority of our civilization has become a mobile (information) society. People’s increased mobility has impacted many areas, resulting in the overcrowding of urban spaces, increased energy consumption, and complex mobile decision-making for the individual. In this talk I will demonstrate how novel data sources, methods, and technologies provide ample opportunities for GIScientists to investigate human mobility and behavior in urban environments. Such investigations help to identify individual- and urban-oriented problems, and provide ways of addressing them. Examples will cover human mobility analysis from georeferenced mobile phone data and the analysis of personal mobile decision-making through mobile eye tracking. Martin Raubal is Professor of Geoinformation Engineering at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) Zurich. He was previously Associate Professor and Vice-Chair at the Department of Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara, and Junior Professor at the University of Münster. Martin received his Ph.D. in Geoinformation from Vienna University of Technology in 2001 with honors. He holds a M.S. in Spatial Information Science and Engineering from the University of Maine and a Dipl.-Ing. in Surveying Engineering from Vienna University of Technology. Martin’s research interests lie in the areas of Mobility & Energy, more specifically in mobile GIS & LBS, spatial cognitive engineering, mobile eye-tracking, and GIS for renewable energy analysis. His teaching includes courses on GIS, cartography, geovisualization, location-based services, temporal aspects of GIS, spatial cognition and wayfinding, and research methods. Martin is currently Co-Chair of AGILE (Association of Geographic Information Laboratories in Europe) and was a board member of UCGIS (University Consortium for Geographic Information Science) from 2008-11. He serves as Associate Editor of the Journal of Location Based Services, and on the editorial boards of Transactions in GIS, Journal of Spatial Information Science, Spatial Cognition and Computation, and Geography Compass. He has authored and co-authored more than 100 books and research papers published in refereed journals and conference proceedings. — The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts. Please contact Andrea Ballatore (893-5267, aballatore@spatial.ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking. Follow spatial@ucsb on Facebook | Twitter | Google+ | Google...

GIS Day@UCSB Geography

Nov 18, 2015 • Categories: Event | GIS Day | Related Initiatives

GIS day is the third Wednesday of November in each year, during the Geography Awareness Week. As a global event, GIS day provides a great opportunity for GIS users and researchers to exchange ideas and present works to a wide audience. To celebrate this special day for spatial studies, we will hold a lightning talk on Wednesday November 18 at 12pm at the UCSB Center for Spatial Studies. Pizza and drinks will be served. RSVP...