spatial@ucsb.local2019: Poster and Plenary Session

 

spatial@ucsb.local2019

Thursday, June 6, 2018

Corwin Pavilion

Invitation & Agenda Speakers Posters

The annual spatial@ucsb.local2019 Poster and Plenary Session was held on Wednesday, June 6, 2018 at Corwin Pavilion.

This year’s theme for the event was Spatial Data for Smarter Cities. Keynotes were delivered by Mahnoosh Alizadeh (Electrical and Computer Engineering, UC Santa Barbara), Konstadinos (Kostas) Goulias (Dept. of Geography, UC Santa Barbara), and Kurt Shellhause (Water Resources Engineer, Kasraie Consulting). Representatives from the private sector and industry and campus-wide academics in the humanities, sciences, social sciences, and engineering programs had the opportunity to showcase how spatial thinking facilitates research and creativity. A total of 38 posters were submitted for viewing. Some of these have been posted to this website.

spatial@ucsb.local2018: Poster and Plenary Session

spatial@ucsb.local2018

Wednesday, June 6, 2018

9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Corwin Pavilion

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The annual spatial@ucsb.local2018 Poster and Plenary Session was held on Wednesday, June 6, 2018 at Corwin Pavilion, from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

This year’s theme for the event was Improving Information Accuracy for Extreme Events. Keynotes were delivered by Jessica White (Direct Relief International), Chris Renschler (Dept. of Geography, University at Buffalo), and Brian Heath (Ventura County Fire Department). Representatives from the private sector and industry and campus-wide academics in the humanities, sciences, social sciences, and engineering programs were invited to showcase how spatial thinking facilitates research and creativity. A total of 53 posters were submitted for viewing.

See agenda, speaker bios and abstracts, and a sampling of posters above.

Spatial Tech Lunch: Marthe Wens

On Wednesday, May 30, from 12:00–1:00 pm please join us for the next Spatial Technology Lunch in the Center for Spatial Studies (Phelps Hall 3512). This semi-regular series, hosted by spatial@ucsb, aims to promote discussion and interaction within the university’s spatial technology community. Please RSVP to Crystal Bae (cbae@spatial.ucsb.edu) by Monday, May 28. Pizza and drinks will be provided.

Integrating heterogeneous, dynamic adaptation behaviour in drought risk modelling

Marthe Wens


Abstract: Droughts are a prevalent and costly hazard impacting urban, agricultural, and natural systems. Increasing climate variability is expected to exacerbate drought conditions in many parts of the world while evolving socio-economic conditions and adaptation strategies influence both short and long term risk to ecosystems, economies, and human health. Since adaptation strategies evolve over time, explicitly modeling these dynamics is important for understanding future risk.

In this talk I will advocate extending the traditional drought-risk framework to better include the bilateral relationship between human and physical systems. The use of agent-based modeling technique to simulate the co-evolution of future drought hazard, exposure, vulnerability and heterogeneous, individual adaptation decisions, is showcased using a case study in Kitui, rural East Kenya.

Marthe Wens is currently a PhD Student in the Department of Water and Climate Risk Institute for Environmental Studies at the Instituut voor Milieuvraagstukken (IVM).

Spatial Tech Lunch: Jorge Chen

On Tuesday, May 22, from 12:00–1:00 pm please join us for the next Spatial Technology Lunch in the Center for Spatial Studies (Phelps Hall 3512). This semi-regular series, hosted by spatial@ucsb, aims to promote discussion and interaction within the university’s spatial technology community. Please RSVP to Crystal Bae (cbae@spatial.ucsb.edu) by Sunday, May 20. Pizza and drinks will be provided.

How well can a $750 DIY LiDAR scanner scan?

Jorge Chen

Chen Tech Lunch
Abstract: Laser scanners provide a fast, convenient, and accurate way to take distance measurements of the surrounding environment. They operate by calculating the time it takes for a light beam to travel to a distant object and back using a process called light detection and ranging, or LiDAR, that, when repeated numerous times, forms a “point cloud” of (x,y,z) coordinates. Until very recently, only large enterprise users with big budgets could afford this type of technology, with the cost of most LiDAR scanners running well over $100K. However, the trickling down of LiDAR to consumer products has resulted in a new class of relatively cheap sensors that can now be found in robotic vacuum cleaners, drones, autonomous vehicles, and maybe even in upcoming smartphones.

This presentation looks at the performance of the Scanse 3D panoramic LiDAR scanner, one of the first panoramic scanners designed for consumer use. At an incredible price of $750, this camera-sized do-it-yourself scanner uses a $150 LiDAR sensor attached to two orthogonally rotating servos that are controlled by open source software on a Raspberry Pi — all powered by an off-the-shelf cell phone charger. Performance assessment involved comparing measurements of a conference room taken with the Scanse 3D and a professional Trimble scanner. Results showed the Scanse consistently overestimated room dimensions by 15 cm, although at the local level of a flat surface it showed sub-centimeter accuracy, with high standard deviation and sub-centimeter precision. This latter result indicated systematic drift, which can be seen in a plot of the point cloud. Perhaps more interesting than the results, though, were the challenges faced in aligning the noisy and wavy Scanse data with the highly accurate and precise Trimble data. These were addressed using extended Gaussian image analysis, histogram analysis, and the iterative closest point process, all of which will be covered during the presentation.

Jorge Chen is currently a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Geography at UCSB.

ThinkSpatial: Kate McDonald

thinkspatial_logo
On Tuesday, May 15, 2018 The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents

The Accidental Digital Humanist: The Bodies and Structures Project and the Challenge of Spatial Humanities

Kate McDonald

Department of History
University of California, Santa Barbara

12:00 p.m. Tuesday, May 15, 2018 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map)

Flyer

Abstract:
Kate McDonaldKate McDonald is excited to share a digital spatial history project, Bodies and Structures: Deep-Mapping the Spaces of Japanese History, which she is currently developing with her colleague David Ambaras (History, NC State). Bodies and Structures is a platform for researching and teaching the spatial histories of Japan, its empire, and the larger worlds of which they were a part. It begins from the premise that space and place are fundamental to humanistic inquiry. It unfolds into a method of writing spatial histories that reveal the multiple topologies of historical experience rather than a chronology of spatial thought or territorial transformation.
The talk will introduce the site and the intellectual stakes of the project. In particular, she will focus on two themes: (a) how she started with a plan to write a new kind of spatial history and ended up knee-deep in the digital humanities; and (b) why, after two years into the project, she argues that the spatial humanities need a digital platform like Bodies and Structures.

There will be time to explore and discuss the site — please bring your laptop in addition to your lunch!

Bio: Kate McDonald is Assistant Professor of Modern Japanese History at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is the author of Placing Empire: Travel and the Social Imagination in Imperial Japan (University of California Press, 2017) and co-director of the Bodies and Structures: Deep-Mapping the Spaces of Japanese History project.

The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts.

Please contact Werner Kuhn (kuhn@ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking.

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Spatial Tech Lunch: Sinan Yuan

On Monday, April 30, from 12:00–1:00 pm please join us for the next Spatial Technology Lunch in the Center for Spatial Studies (Phelps Hall 3512). This semi-regular series, hosted by spatial@ucsb, aims to promote discussion and interaction within the university’s spatial technology community.

Please RSVP to Crystal Bae (cbae@spatial.ucsb.edu) by Saturday, April 28. Pizza and drinks will be provided.

Experimental VR Research on Spatial Cognition in Chinese Traditional Villages

Sinan Yuan
Associate Prof. Department of Architecture
Tianjin University, Tianjin, China


Abstract: By using VR technology, the researcher establishes an experiment platform to analyze the spatial cognition process of people when they are wandering in the traditional Chinese villages. Xiamei and Chengcun, two traditional villages in northern Fujian province, were chosen as the samples in the experiment. The data of movements, head directions of the subjects in the experiment were collected as well as the corresponding subjective feedbacks during the experiment. Through data visualization and analysis, the research reveals the characteristics of the cognition and behavior of the participants when experiencing a complex space such as the traditional villages.

Sinan Yuan is currently a visiting scholar at UCSB from Tianjin University in China.

Report on Leadership Workshop on Location Analytics in Business

The final report from the Leadership Workshop on Location Analytics in Business is now posted and available to read here.

This meeting was held at the Upham Hotel in Santa Barbara from January 31 to February 2, 2018. The motivation for this workshop originated in an effort by Esri to encourage greater use of location analytics in business, and to that end to engage with the discipline of information systems (IS) as a way of reaching an appropriate set of leaders in business education. Esri staff had made presentations at previous conferences of the Association for Information Systems (AIS) such as the Americas Conference on Information Systems (AMCIS), and had been encouraged by the level of interest they observed in location analytics. Michael Gould of Esri and three faculty of the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB; Michael Goodchild, emeritus; Werner Kuhn; and Krzysztof Janowicz) began the process of planning a workshop to be held in Santa Barbara in early December 2017, with the aim of further developing strategies and building bridges between the IS and GIScience communities. An open call was issued, and invitations were advanced to a number of key individuals.

In early December the Thomas Fire broke out and expanded rapidly across a wide area of Southern California, causing unhealthy levels of smoke in the Santa Barbara area, plus substantial risk that the fire would reach the city. The workshop had to be postponed at the last minute, and a new date of January 31 was announced. Unfortunately the new dates were impossible for some of the participants, leading to a workshop that was smaller than anticipated. However a very compelling set of presentations and extensive discussions occurred; this report is an account of the meeting and its conclusions. Read the full report here.

The workshop was hosted by the Center for Spatial Studies at UCSB, and sponsored by Esri.