ThinkSpatial: Qinghua Ding

Sep 27, 2018 • Categories: Event | Featured | ThinkSpatial

On Tuesday, October 2, 2018, The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents Recent Slow Melt of Arctic Summer Sea Ice caused by Tropical SST Changes Qinghua Ding Department of Geography University of California, Santa Barbara 12:00 p.m. Tuesday, October 2, 2018 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map) Flyer Abstract: Arctic sea ice in September, the minimum observed area each year, is very sensitive to global climate variability. Thus, the abrupt decline of this minimum area since the 1980s has been viewed as a “canary in the coalmine” of human-caused climate change in the Arctic. However, over the recent decade the rate of decline has slowed to a near-zero change. This shift in the rate of sea-ice decline cannot be fully explained by the steady increase of greenhouse gas emissions over the same period. Here we show that this slow-down may be due to internal variability of sea surface temperatures in the Eastern tropical Pacific that generate atmospheric circulation change reaching the Arctic. This change in the Arctic atmosphere has resulted in abnormal, abrupt warming from the early 2000s to 2012 and relative cooling in the recent years in the Arctic that can partially enhance and mask the effects of human-induced warming during the corresponding periods. Given the importance of this internal process in driving the Arctic climate on low–frequency time scales, a better understanding of its underlying mechanisms will improve future projections of Arctic climate.. Bio: Qinghua Ding received his Ph.D. from the University of Hawaii in 2008. His Ph.D. work was to understand the Asian monsoon variability over the last 60 years and its linkage with global circulation variability. In 2010 he started to work at University of Washington as Research Associate on developing an isotope-enabled global climate model and understanding the recent climate change in the Arctic and Antarctic from the perspective of climate dynamics. He found that the recent warming trends in the Arctic and Antarctic are partly attributed to a tropical SST-related natural variability. He joined the Polar Science Center in 2014 and accepted a faculty position at UCSB in 2016. For future research, his focus is on exploring polar-lower latitude connections in the past 1000 years by using atmosphere-ocean-ice fully coupled GCMs, isotope-enabled GCMs and paleo-climate proxy data. The ultimate goal is to provide more reliable projections of the polar climate response to anthropogenic climate forcing. — The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts. Please contact Werner Kuhn (kuhn@ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary...

spatial@ucsb.local2018: Poster and Plenary Session

Jun 6, 2018 • Categories: Event | Featured | spatial@ucsb.local

Wednesday, June 6, 2018 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Corwin Pavilion Invitation & Agenda Speakers Posters The annual spatial@ucsb.local2018 Poster and Plenary Session was held on Wednesday, June 6, 2018 at Corwin Pavilion, from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. This year’s theme for the event was Improving Information Accuracy for Extreme Events. Keynotes were delivered by Jessica White (Direct Relief International), Chris Renschler (Dept. of Geography, University at Buffalo), and Brian Heath (Ventura County Fire Department). Representatives from the private sector and industry and campus-wide academics in the humanities, sciences, social sciences, and engineering programs were invited to showcase how spatial thinking facilitates research and creativity. A total of 53 posters were submitted for viewing. See agenda, speaker bios and abstracts, and a sampling of posters...

Spatial Tech Lunch: Marthe Wens

May 30, 2018 • Categories: Event | Spatial Tech Lunch

On Wednesday, May 30, from 12:00–1:00 pm please join us for the next Spatial Technology Lunch in the Center for Spatial Studies (Phelps Hall 3512). This semi-regular series, hosted by spatial@ucsb, aims to promote discussion and interaction within the university’s spatial technology community. Please RSVP to Crystal Bae (cbae@spatial.ucsb.edu) by Monday, May 28. Pizza and drinks will be provided. Integrating heterogeneous, dynamic adaptation behaviour in drought risk modelling Marthe Wens Abstract: Droughts are a prevalent and costly hazard impacting urban, agricultural, and natural systems. Increasing climate variability is expected to exacerbate drought conditions in many parts of the world while evolving socio-economic conditions and adaptation strategies influence both short and long term risk to ecosystems, economies, and human health. Since adaptation strategies evolve over time, explicitly modeling these dynamics is important for understanding future risk. In this talk I will advocate extending the traditional drought-risk framework to better include the bilateral relationship between human and physical systems. The use of agent-based modeling technique to simulate the co-evolution of future drought hazard, exposure, vulnerability and heterogeneous, individual adaptation decisions, is showcased using a case study in Kitui, rural East Kenya. Marthe Wens is currently a PhD Student in the Department of Water and Climate Risk Institute for Environmental Studies at the Instituut voor Milieuvraagstukken...

Spatial Tech Lunch: Jorge Chen

May 22, 2018 • Categories: Event | Spatial Tech Lunch

On Tuesday, May 22, from 12:00–1:00 pm please join us for the next Spatial Technology Lunch in the Center for Spatial Studies (Phelps Hall 3512). This semi-regular series, hosted by spatial@ucsb, aims to promote discussion and interaction within the university’s spatial technology community. Please RSVP to Crystal Bae (cbae@spatial.ucsb.edu) by Sunday, May 20. Pizza and drinks will be provided. How well can a $750 DIY LiDAR scanner scan? Jorge Chen Abstract: Laser scanners provide a fast, convenient, and accurate way to take distance measurements of the surrounding environment. They operate by calculating the time it takes for a light beam to travel to a distant object and back using a process called light detection and ranging, or LiDAR, that, when repeated numerous times, forms a “point cloud” of (x,y,z) coordinates. Until very recently, only large enterprise users with big budgets could afford this type of technology, with the cost of most LiDAR scanners running well over $100K. However, the trickling down of LiDAR to consumer products has resulted in a new class of relatively cheap sensors that can now be found in robotic vacuum cleaners, drones, autonomous vehicles, and maybe even in upcoming smartphones. This presentation looks at the performance of the Scanse 3D panoramic LiDAR scanner, one of the first panoramic scanners designed for consumer use. At an incredible price of $750, this camera-sized do-it-yourself scanner uses a $150 LiDAR sensor attached to two orthogonally rotating servos that are controlled by open source software on a Raspberry Pi — all powered by an off-the-shelf cell phone charger. Performance assessment involved comparing measurements of a conference room taken with the Scanse 3D and a professional Trimble scanner. Results showed the Scanse consistently overestimated room dimensions by 15 cm, although at the local level of a flat surface it showed sub-centimeter accuracy, with high standard deviation and sub-centimeter precision. This latter result indicated systematic drift, which can be seen in a plot of the point cloud. Perhaps more interesting than the results, though, were the challenges faced in aligning the noisy and wavy Scanse data with the highly accurate and precise Trimble data. These were addressed using extended Gaussian image analysis, histogram analysis, and the iterative closest point process, all of which will be covered during the presentation. Jorge Chen is currently a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Geography at...