Rescheduled: Location Analytics in Business Workshop

Dec 10, 2017 • Categories: Event | Featured | Workshops

The Location Analytics in Business workshop, originally scheduled for December 11–13, 2017, has been rescheduled for Wednesday, January 31 to Friday, February 2, 2018. Suggested travel dates are Tuesday, January 30 and Friday afternoon, February 2 or Saturday, February 3. We will be accepting new applications until January 5, 2018. Please submit CV and brief statement of your position on location analytics to...

Call for Speakers: Spatial Lightning Talks 2018

Dec 6, 2017 • Categories: Event | Featured | Lightning Talks

The UCSB Center for Spatial Studies invites interested speakers for the 2018 Spatial Lightning Talks on Friday, February 9 at 12:00 p.m. This annual series of 3-minute lightning talks brings together speakers from across the UCSB campus as well as the local community to enlighten the crowd on spatial topics of all sorts. This fast-paced, interdisciplinary event is a great opportunity to share your work or special interest (it doesn’t have to be academic!), and it provides experience in delivering a concise, attention-grabbing talk to a diverse audience. Mark your calendars now, whether you are interested in giving a talk or just attending: When: Friday, February 9, 2018 from 12:00 to 1:00 p.m.; lunch will be served as of 11:45 a.m. Where: Mosher Alumni House, 2nd Floor Alumni Hall Do you think you’re up for the challenge of presenting an interesting, spatially-relevant topic in just three minutes? We are inviting speakers to sign up by Friday, January 12. Since we are limiting the number of speakers this year, we will let you know in January whether you are selected to be one of the ten Spatial Lightning Talks speakers that will be presenting. To see topics for previous presentations see http://spatial.ucsb.edu/lightning-talks/ Sign up to be a speaker...

Spatial Tech Lunch: Erin Wetherley

Nov 29, 2017 • Categories: Event | Spatial Tech Lunch

On Tuesday, December 5, from 12:00–1:00 pm please join us for the next Spatial Technology Lunch in the Center for Spatial Studies (Phelps Hall 3512). This semi-regular series, hosted by spatial@ucsb, aims to promote discussion and interaction within the university’s spatial technology community. Please RSVP to Crystal Bae (cbae@spatial.ucsb.edu) by Sunday, December 3. Pizza and drinks will be provided. Evaluating vegetation type effects on land surface temperature at the city scale Erin Wetherley Abstract: The growing concentration of the global human population into cities has coincided with the rise of increasingly rich remote sensing data. Near-future hyperspectral/thermal satellites could revolutionize our understanding of urban environments by allowing us to discriminate urban materials and examine their thermal properties. With this wealth of information, we will be able to disentangle the links between land cover, management, and climate at the city scale for the very first time, with significant consequences for improved modeling of urban climate, energy, and water use, as well as targeted urban planning and public health initiatives. I will present new results in which we sampled the material and thermal heterogeneity of the Los Angeles, CA, metropolitan area (4,283 km2) to quantify, analyze, and model surface drivers of urban heat. We used airborne hyperspectral imagery (AVIRIS: 36 m resolution, 224 bands, 0.35 – 2.5 μm) to produce robust estimates of fine-scale (sub-pixel) urban patches, defined as mixtures of key urban surface classes. We then used airborne MASTER thermal imagery to quantify and model surface temperature changes as patch mixtures transitioned from low to high proportions of vegetation. Significant differences were observed between tree, turfgrass, senesced vegetation, and impervious mixtures. Finally, we used our modeled and measured temperatures to observe and quantify additional urban microclimate drivers beyond urban patch type, including income levels, building fraction, and irrigation. Erin Wetherley is a Ph.D. student at...

Pascal Hitzler: A Brief Introduction to Semantic Web – and a Contribution to Explainable Artificial Intelligence

Nov 15, 2017 • Categories: Event

On Thursday, November 16 at 12:00pm, please join us for a talk by Pascal Hitzler in the Center for Spatial Studies (Phelps Hall 3512). “A Brief Introduction to Semantic Web – and a Contribution to Explainable Artificial Intelligence” Pascal Hitzler Department of Computer Science and Engineering Wright State University 12:00pm Thursday, November 16, 2017 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map) Abstract: Semantic Web as a field of research and applications is concerned with methods and tools for data sharing, discovery, integration, and reuse, both on and off the World Wide Web. In the form of knowledge graphs and their underlying schemas, Semantic Web technologies are currently entering industrial mainstream. At the same time, the ever increasing prevalence of publicly available structured data on the Semantic Web enables new applications in a variety of domains, and as part of this presentation, we provide a conceptual approach that leverages such data in order to explain the input-output behavior of trained artificial neural networks. We apply existing Semantic Web technologies in order to provide an experimental proof of concept. Bio: Pascal Hitzler is endowed NCR Distinguished Professor and Director of Data Science at the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio, U.S.A. His research record lists over 350 publications in such diverse areas as semantic web, neural-symbolic integration, knowledge representation and reasoning, machine learning, denotational semantics, and set-theoretic topology. He is Editor-in-chief of the Semantic Web journal by IOS Press, which is the leading journal in the field, and of the IOS Press book series Studies on the Semantic Web. He is co-author of the W3C Recommendation OWL 2 Primer, and of the book Foundations of Semantic Web Technologies by CRC Press, 2010 which was named as one out of seven Outstanding Academic Titles 2010 in Information and Computer Science by the American Library Association’s Choice Magazine, and has translations into German and Chinese. He is on the editorial board of several journals and book series and is a founding steering committee member of the Neural-Symbolic Learning and Reasoning (NeSy) workshop series, and of the Association for Ontology Design and Patterns (ODPA). He also frequently acts as conference chair in various functions. For more information, see http://www.pascal-hitzler.de. Follow spatial@ucsb on Facebook | Twitter | Google+ | Google...

Grad2Prof: Lessons Learned on an Academic Trajectory

Nov 13, 2017 • Categories: Event

On Monday, November 20, from 11:30am – 12:30pm, please join us for a talk from a returning UCSB Geography alumni in the Center for Spatial Studies (Phelps Hall 3512). “Grad2Prof: Lessons learned on an academic trajectory” Grant McKenzie Department of Geographical Sciences University of Maryland, College Park 11:30am Monday, November 20, 2017 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map) Abstract: The process of transitioning from graduate student to tenure-track professor is a daunting one. The ‘traditional’ academic trajectory has changed substantially over the past few years and while each researcher and educator makes their own path, there are common hurtles that most eventually face. In this talk I discuss the lessons that I’ve learned navigating the murky waters of a junior tenure-track professorship at a research-focused university. The purpose is to provide alumni-level insight into the transition from graduate student to professor and is meant to be informative and lighthearted. In short, this is the talk I wish I had attended 3 years ago. Bio: Grant McKenzie is an assistant professor in the Department of Geographical Sciences, affiliate of the Center for Geospatial Information Science, member of the Human Computer Interaction Lab. He holds a PhD in Geography from the University of California, Santa Barbara (2015), a Master of Applied Science degree from the University of Melbourne (2008) and a Bachelors in Geography from the University of British Columbia (2002). Dr. McKenzie’s research interests lie in spatio-temporal data analysis, geovisualization, place-based analytics and the intersection of information technologies and society. Currently, he is exploring computational, data-driven models of human behavior, taking a multi-dimensional approach to investigating the relationship between place & space and the activities people carry out at those places. The foundation of this research involves working with large geosocial, user-contributed and authoritative datasets, exploiting and visualizing spatial, temporal and thematic signatures within the data. These signatures are employ through unique methods and statistical models for the development of effective interactive (desktop and mobile) geovisualization, place-based prediction models and knowledge discovery applications. Follow spatial@ucsb on Facebook | Twitter | Google+ | Google...