Thomas Hervey SIGSPATIAL Presentation

Nov 1, 2016 • Categories: Event

Farmers face pressure to respond to unpredictable weather, the spread of pests, and other variable events on their farms. At this year’s ACM SIGSPATIAL conference, Thomas Hervey presented preliminary work during the Geographic Information Retrieval workshop on building a notification decision support system for farmers. From collaboration with colleagues in UCSB’s computer science department, this work focuses on matching a farmer’s parcel location and hazard events of interest keywords with social media reports. The title of the talk was Extracting Spatial Information from Social Media in Support of Agricultural Management...

ThinkSpatial: Tomi Kauppinen

Oct 24, 2016 • Categories: Event | ThinkSpatial

On Tuesday, November 8, 2016 The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents “On Spatial Aboutness” Tomi Kauppinen Aalto University School of Science Helsinski, Finland 12:00 p.m. Tuesday, November 8, 2016 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map) View Flyer   Abstract: Search for information has become an inherent part of our life, both at work and for leisure. The challenge is that information needs to be indexed to allow for search to be effective. Kauppinen will discuss one particular task: how to deal with “spatial aboutness” of information objects (such as books at a library, paintings at a museum, experiences of people in spaces or tagged contents of a social media platform). The main, emerging question is how different approaches can together be made to support the spatial aboutness of objects to be more explicit. He will use examples to illustrate different tasks (such as finding out what places have been studied in given research papers) and results (such as visualizations of spatial aboutness of human observations). Bio: Tomi Kauppinen is a project leader and docent at the Aalto University School of Science in Finland. He holds a habilitation (2014) in geoinformatics from the University of Muenster in Germany and a Ph.D. (2010) in media technology from the Aalto University. From April 2014 to September 2014 he was appointed as the Cognitive Systems Substitute Professor at the University of Bremen in Germany. He has been active in opening and sharing data, and created semantic recommendation and information exploration engines. The central themes in his research and teaching are linked data, data science and information visualization applied to spatio‐temporal phenomena, and supporting the understanding of related cognitive processes. He has actively created online tutorials on these themes and has run related courses and tutorials at international conferences and universities. He has co‐chaired workshops on visual approaches, spatial thinking and linked science, including the International Workshops on Linked Science 2011—2015 at the International Semantic Web Conferences. He is also the founder and community leader of LinkedScience.org. — The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts. Please contact Werner Kuhn (805-893-8224, kuhn@geog.ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking. Follow spatial@ucsb on Facebook | Twitter | Google+ | Google...

ThinkSpatial: André Bruggmann

Oct 20, 2016 • Categories: Event | ThinkSpatial

On Tuesday, November 29, 2016 The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents “Ontology and Epistemology of Indoor Manufacturing Environments” André Bruggmann GIScience Center, Department of Geography University of Zurich 12:00 p.m. Tuesday, November 29, 2016 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map) View Flyer Abstract: The wealth of information stored in large online text archives, such as Google Books, makes it difficult for information seekers to access relevant information and detect and explore hidden patterns in the data. In my talk, illustrate how this challenge can be addressed by following a typical GIScience approach. Bruggmann focuses on how spatio‐temporal and thematic information and interconnections implicitly stored in large online text archives can be made explicit, and examines how this might help information seekers learn and gain new insight into space, time, and theme. He investigated a typical digital text archive in the humanities. Indeed, text documents in the humanities are particularly interesting to GIScience because they contain significant spatial, temporal, and thematic information, which has been mostly untapped for spatio‐temporal and thematic analyses thus far. The approach he presents encompasses three stages: (1) the automatic retrieval of spatio‐temporal and thematic information from semi‐structured text documents (i.e., geographic information retrieval); (2) the transformation of the retrieved information and the visualization of interesting spatio‐temporal and thematic structures and interconnections (i.e., spatialization); and (3) the user‐centered design and evaluation of two web tools used to explore space, time, and theme interactively (i.e., geovisual analytics). Evaluating web tools shows that they support target users exploring the humanities from a spatio‐temporal and thematic perspective and reveals the potential of applying this approach to other large online data archives to help users interactively learn about space, time, and theme. Bio: André Bruggmann is a Ph.D. candidate at the GIScience Center of the Geography Department at the University of Zurich, Switzerland. He received his BSc and MSc in Geography from the University of Zurich. Bruggmann focuses on geographic information visualization and analysis and is particularly interested in geovisual analytics, spatialization, geographic information retrieval, and the digital humanities. His research is situated at the nexus of geography and the humanities, and he investigates methods to automatically retrieve, transform, and interactively visualize spatio temporal and thematic data in large digital text archives. — The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts. Please contact Werner Kuhn (805-893-8224, kuhn@geog.ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking. Follow spatial@ucsb on Facebook | Twitter | Google+ | Google...

Thinkspatial: Ben Halpern

Oct 19, 2016 • Categories: Event | ThinkSpatial

On Tuesday, November 1, 2016 The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents “Mapping Global Hotspots of Ocean Aquaculture” Ben Halpern NCEAS University of California, Santa Barbara 12:00 p.m. Tuesday, November 1, 2016 | 3512 Phelps Hall (map)    View Flyer  Abstract: The human population is expected to reach nearly 10 billion people by 2050, and its appetite for protein is predicted to exceed that growth. With wild fish catch plateauing or declining, one of the few and most sustainable ways to meet that demand is marine offshore aquaculture. I will present results from an ongoing SNAPP (Science for Nature and People Partnership) initiative focused on offshore aquaculture in which we explored and mapped the potential for aquaculture growth, highlighting hotspot locations for both finfish and shellfish. This work highlights the prospects for science to actively help determine and communicate the most sound conservation and sustainable expansion of this food resource. Bio: Ben Halpern is the Director of the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) and Professor in the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at UC Santa Barbara. He is also Chair in Marine Conservation at Imperial College London and serves as the Director of the Center for Marine Assessment and Planning (CMAP) at UC Santa Barbara. He received his Ph.D. in marine ecology in 2003 from UC Santa Barbara and then held a joint post‐doctoral fellowship at NCEAS and the Smith Fellowship Program. He was a Research Associate at NCEAS for the decade following that until joining the faculty at the Bren School. Halpern focuses his research at the interface between marine ecology and conservation planning. He has led and participated in several key synthetic research projects that have advanced our understanding of the state of the world’s oceans and the potential for marine reserves to improve ocean condition. In particular, he has led the development and mapping of cumulative impact assessments at global and regional scales in marine and freshwater systems and has been the lead scientist for the Ocean Health Index project. He also leads the SNAPP working group on Sustainable Offshore Aquaculture. In the past 15 years Halpern has published nearly 150 peer‐reviewed articles and was recently named one of the World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds by Thompson‐Reuters and awarded the A.G Huntsman Award for Excellence in Marine Science by the Royal Society of Canada. — The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts. Please contact Werner Kuhn (805-893-8224, kuhn@geog.ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that...