Workshop on Spatial Thinking CFP @ COSIT

Oct 12, 2015 • Categories: Related Initiatives | Research

The Center for Spatial Studies invites you to participate in the Workshop on Teaching Spatial Thinking from Interdisciplinary Perspectives (SPATIALTHINKING2015) When: October 12, 2015 Where: Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA Collocated with Conference on Spatial Information Theory XII (COSIT 2015) Workshop URI: http://linkedscience.org/events/spatialthinking2015 Hashtag:...

ThinkSpatial: Andrew U. Frank

Oct 9, 2015 • Categories: Event | ThinkSpatial

The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents Differences in ontologies   Andrew U. Frank, Professor for Geoinformation, TU Wien, Austria (Special edition) 12:00–1:30 p.m. Friday, October 9, 2015 | Phelps Hall 3512 (map) Abstract. Large “standard” ontologies are constructed (e.g. CYC), and even more effort goes today into ontologies for specific application areas (medicine, law, etc.); in principle, the assumption is that these ontologies should be similar, if not the same.  A reader of (literary) texts observes differences in the ontology of the text compared to his own and adjust the interpretation of the text accordingly.  The differences are most pronounced in fairytales, science fiction novels etc. but also noticeable in other texts.  For example, political background diffferences results in different semantics for common words (see Lakoff’s study “Don’t think of a pink elephant”).  GI science claims to integrate data from different domains, thus data with different ontologies.  To what degree is it possible, to extract from a text the difference to a “standard” ontology? Which differences are important for spatial analysis and mapping? Dr. Andrew U. Frank has been a Professor of Geoinformation at the Technical University of Vienna since 1991. He teaches courses in spatial information systems, representation of geometric data, design of Geographic Information Systems for administration and business, and economic and administrative strategies for the introduction of GIS. He leads an active research group, focusing on problems of spatial cognition, user interfaces for GIS, and the economic and organizational aspects of the collection, management, and use of geographic information. Since 1980, Dr. Frank has published widely on database management systems for GIS, in particular on spatial access methods and spatial query languages. In 1990, he published a book on ‘Cognitive and Linguistic Aspects of Geographic Space’ with David Mark. He organized the Conference on Spatial Theory in 1992, 1993, 1995 and 1997, with proceedings published by Springer-Verlag in the Series Lecture Notes in Computer Science. His most important publications are on qualitative spatial reasoning and, later on, ontologies for GIS. Prior to his current position, Dr. Frank has been a professor of Land Information Studies in the Department of Surveying Engineering at the University of Maine. He was also co-founder and later head of the Maine branch of the National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis (NCGIA), a research center funded by the National Science Foundation. He received his Ph.D. (1982) from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, Switzerland and a Dipl.Ing. degree (1978) from the same institute. — The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts....

Spatial Discovery Expert Meeting: Final Report

Aug 24, 2015 • Categories: Featured | News | Publications | Specialist Meetings

Final Report on our 2015 Specialist Meeting on Spatial Discovery Editors: Savannah Cooley,  Sara Lafia, Antonio Medrano, Denise Stephens, and Werner Kuhn This report summarizes a two-day expert meeting on “Spatial Discovery,” organized jointly by the Library and the Center for Spatial Studies of the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), and held on June 16–17, 2015 at the Upham Hotel, in Santa Barbara. The 24 participants contributed expertise in Library Science, as well as knowledge pertaining to spatial information and relevant research on data-seeking behavior. Five keynote addresses as well as several plenary and break-out discussions explored the challenges, best practices, and potential strategies associated with the cross-platform discovery of spatial data in the context of modern libraries. Spatial Search – Final...