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The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents

Linda Hill with Greg Janée,

Jim Frew, and Krzysztof Janowicz

Gazetteers: Tools for Spatial Search, Identification, and Reasoning

Phelps Hall 3512
12:00 p.m. Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Abstract. One aspect of the 1994–1996 NSF-funded Alexandria Digital Library project at UCSB was pioneering work to define, develop, and implement a digital gazetteer of approximately 5 million entries, supported by the development of the ADL Gazetteer Content Standard, the ADL Feature Type Thesaurus, and the framework for querying distributed collections of Information. This work supported spatio-temporal referencing and reasoning to understand the relationships between information resources (i.e., data, documents, maps, images) and geographic locations. The ADL Gazetteer has been recognized as a valuable resource for research purposes and has been restored in a Linked Data version.

Linda Hill (Geography, UCSB—retired) joined the Alexandria Digital Library project in 1996 and brought with her an appreciation of the complexities of gazetteers from her Ph.D. focus at the University of Pittsburgh and previous work with indexing and abstracting services and science-based libraries.

Greg Janée (Earth Research Institute, UCSB) joined the Alexandria Digital Library project in 1998 and was principal developer of the ADL system. He helped develop the ADL Gazetteer system and, with Hill, co-authored the ADL Gazetteer Protocol and ADL Thesaurus Protocol.

James Frew (Bren School of Environmental Science and Management, UCSB) was co-PI and implementation team leader for the Alexandria Digital Library Project, 1994–2004, during which he worked with Hill and Janée on the design and implementation of the ADL Gazetteer.

Krzysztof Janowicz (Geography, UCSB) is interested in the Geospatial Semantic Web and Linked Data. He has worked on gazetteer ontologies and semantically enabled user interfaces for them and published a Linked Data version of the ADL Gazetteer.

The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts.
Please contact Andrea Ballatore (893-5267, aballatore@spatial.ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking.