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The UCSB brown-bag forum on spatial thinking presents

David Lanter

CDM Smith Inc.

A Social Vulnerability Analysis Framework for Flood Prevention Civil Works Projects

Phelps Hall 3512
12:00 p.m. Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Abstract. The Social Vulnerability Explorer (SV-X) is a geospatially enabled software application prototype being developed to enable government hazard protection and emergency response planners assess vulnerabilities of populations at risk from impacts of environmental hazards such as flooding. It is also paving the way for including social vulnerability measures within the government’s multi-criteria decision making framework for prioritizing civil works projects for funding. This presentation will provide a brief overview of social vulnerability and its measures, and review the architecture, data visualization and decision support capabilities of the SV-X application, the data development system that prepares its data, and data quality capabilities being researched and developed for the next version.

David Lanter is a geographer, inventor, software designer, senior project manager and Vice President with CDM Smith.  He is coauthoring a chapter on “User-Centered Design” in the AAG’s International Encyclopedia of Geography, and another on “Geoprocessing, Workflows, and Provenance” in ASPRS’ Remote Sensing Handbook Vol. 1.  He served as GeoModeling Quality Assurance Lead for Microsoft, Research Director for Rand McNally, Systems Analyst for Grumman Data Systems, Software Engineer for Navigation Sciences, President of Geographic Designs Inc. and on the faculties of UCSB, University of Washington in Seattle, and Drexel University where he taught GIS and Digital Cartography.  His PhD in Geography is from the University of South Carolina, his Masters in Geography is from the State University of New York at Buffalo, and his Bachelors with honors in Science, Technology, and Society is from Clark University.  He is presently a Masters student in IT Auditing and Cybersecurity at Temple University’s Fox School of Business.

The objectives of the ThinkSpatial brown-bag presentations are to exchange ideas about spatial perspectives in research and teaching, to broaden communication and cooperation across disciplines among faculty and graduate students, and to encourage the sharing of tools and concepts.
Please contact Andrea Ballatore (893-5267, aballatore@spatial.ucsb.edu) to review and schedule possible discussion topics or presentations that share your disciplinary interest in spatial thinking.